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Monday, November 6
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/6, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/9, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/10: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Monday November 6, 2017 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Acquisitions Bootcamp
Registration Cost: $225

Podcast with Session Preview


Offered as part of a joint project with UNC Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science.
This seminar will offer an intensive boot camp on acquisitions from three different perspectives: public services, technical services, and the vendor side. The major emphasis is on the nuts and bolts of the acquisitions process from selecting materials especially e-books and acquisitions workflows to assessing collections and articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries). Using an interactive hands-on approach, with case studies, small group discussion, and best practices attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge they can apply in their home institutions. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:
  • Collection Management Overview
  • Budgeting
  • Assessing User Needs / Selecting Materials
  • Acquisitions Workflows
  • Negotiation Strategies & Legal Issues
  • Assessment of Collections
  • Print Materials / E-Resources
  • Marketing / Outreach

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
avatar for Rebecca B. Vargha

Rebecca B. Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for University of Hawaii Press

University of Hawaii Press

University of Hawai'i Press was founded in 1947, with the mission of advancing and disseminating scholarship by publishing in all disciplines on Asia, Hawaii, and the Pacific.



Monday November 6, 2017 9:00am - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Charlotte Initiative Symposium
No charge to attend, but registration is required.

The Charlotte Initiative for Permanent Acquisitions of E-books by Academic Libraries – Research Project Outcomes and Next Steps

Over the last two years attendees of the Charleston Conference have been hearing about The Charlotte Initiative for Permanent Acquisition of E-books by Academic Libraries, a Andrew W. Mellon funded research grant to study the current state of e-books in the academic market. At the heart of the project are three core principles proposed for e-book licenses:


  • Provision of irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights.
  • Allowance for unlimited simultaneous users.
  • Freedom from any Digital Rights Management (DRM), including (but not limited to) use of proprietary formats, restricted access to content, or time-limited access terms.

The last two years have brought many changes to the ever-evolving academic e-book market and now that the project is coming to a close, participants of the grant would like to share their findings and help continue the conversations around the e-books.

To this end, we will be offering a free symposium to all Charleston Conference attendees. The symposium will focus on possible solutions, including evolving business models and publisher feedback to the principles and will present highlights from the four research team findings.

Registration for this event is outside of the general Charleston Conference registration so please register here.Registration is limited so please register soon!

On behalf of the Charlotte Initiative Project Team, we look forward to seeing you there!

Speakers
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Assistant Director for Collection Strategies, Davidson College
KD

Kate Davis

Assistant Director, (Collections & Digital Preservation), Scholars Portal, OCUL
avatar for Kelly Denzer

Kelly Denzer

Electronic Resources Librarian, Davidson College
Kelly is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Davidson College, Davidson, NC. While working on her MLIS, she worked as a Research Assistant for the Mellon funded project, The Charlotte Initiative: Principles for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks for Academic Libraries, at J. Murrey... Read More →
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market... Read More →
avatar for Theresa Liedtka

Theresa Liedtka

Dean, Lupton Library, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford Univeristy Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America... Read More →
avatar for John  Sherer

John Sherer

Director, University of North Carolina Press, University of North Carolina
John Sherer was named the seventh director of the University of North Carolina Press in June of 2012. Prior to that, he was the publisher of Basic Books in New York and also held the positions of Publisher of Nation Books, member of the AAP Trade Executive Committee, and adjunct professor... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I am also Project Team member on the Mellon Funded Charlotte Initiative which focuses on the future of the Academic eBook Market. My presentations at Charleston this year, will focus mostly on usage statistics and... Read More →
avatar for Michael Zeoli

Michael Zeoli

VP, eContent Development, YBP Library Services
YBP Library Services, 1997-current | ebrary, 2005-2007 | Regenstein Library, Acquisitions Dept., University of Chicago | http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/virtual_conferences/eternal_ebooks/


Monday November 6, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Evaluating a Growing Body of Evidence, on the Road to Strategic Decision Making for Collection Development and Open Access
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview


In everything from collection management to journal evaluation, libraries are engaging in evidence-based decision making, but do they have all the evidence? Comparing JR1 and JR5 reports already tells an interesting story, but what happens when you factor in additional data points such as citations, publications and open access? This pre-conference will give participants an in-depth understanding of how different data sets may be combined to form a truly robust body of evidence and provide insights on how the data may be analysed to support a variety of applications including collection management, journal assessment, license negotiations and open access strategies. Two librarians will illustrate how they have used enriched data to support strategic decisions related to Open Access, journal cancellations, and more at their institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Antelman

Kristin Antelman

University Librarian, Caltech
Kristin Antelman is the University Librarian at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) with administrative responsibility for the Library and Archives. Prior to joining Caltech in 2014, she was the Associate Director for the Digital Library at North Carolina State University... Read More →
avatar for Eric Archambault

Eric Archambault

CEO, 1science
Eric Archambault heads 1science and Science-Metrix. 1science facilitates the flow of knowledge and currently focuses on making open access more useful to libraries. Science-Metrix, the sister company of 1science, was founded by Eric and his business partner Grégoire Côté in 2002... Read More →
avatar for Colleen Campbell

Colleen Campbell

OA2020 Partner Development, Max Planck Digital Library
Motivated by a strong personal commitment to the principle of Open Access, Colleen Campbell recently joined the Max Planck Digital Library, based in Munich, Germany, to lead Partner Development in the global Open Access 2020 Initiative. In this role she facilitates collaboration among... Read More →
avatar for Ralf Schimmer

Ralf Schimmer

Head of Scientific Information Provision, Max Planck Digital Library
As Head of Scientific Information Provision at the Max Planck Digital Library in Munich, Germany, Dr Schimmer is responsible for licensing strategy and a broad range of Open Access and other innovative information services supporting the researchers of the over 80 advanced research... Read More →



Monday November 6, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

The Future of the Academic Book: Strengthening the Research Ecosystem
Registration Cost: $150

It’s a truly fascinating time to be working in academia. Changes in the scholarly information chain are coming hard and fast, often prompted and necessitated by external drivers such as the funding bodies’ open access mandates, squeezed library budgets and reduced print sales, and the importance of demonstrating impact of research.

Publishers have responded by launching new book formats, such as short-form, and new ways of measuring book usage. New players have entered the fray with innovative business models and ways of working. Authors face challenges of their own: demonstrating and achieving true impact with research; how to truly achieve the elusive goal of interdisciplinarity; how to safeguard academic freedom; and how to satisfy the demands of regulatory requirements. Librarians are struggling to absorb it all, adapt their systems, communicate to their users, and re-imagine their place in the scholarly community.

This session will bring together diverse stakeholders in the research ecosystem for scholarly books—including a commercial publisher, university press, open access program, faculty author and academic librarian—creating a forum for lively discussion and sharing of ideas, knowledge and perspectives on collaboration, transparency, business models, skills, technology, siloes, sustainability and neglected fields in the book market. We will follow a loosely structured format emphasizing the informal exchange of ideas between participants, including breakout groups to be run concurrently around key themes of interdisciplinarity, impact and innovation.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro
avatar for Ann Beynon

Ann Beynon

Manager, Solution Specialists, Clarivate Analytics
avatar for Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley

Director of Online Strategy, UC Davis
Peter Brantley (@naypinya) is Director of Online Strategy for the University of California Davis Library. Previously, I was the Director of Digital Development at New York Public Library, and the Director of Scholarly Communication at the open source not-for-profit, Hypothes.is. Currently... Read More →
avatar for Charlotte Maiorana

Charlotte Maiorana

Senior Editor, Emerald Publishing
Charlotte Maiorana is Senior Editor at Emerald Publishing, where she is growing the scholarly business, economics, finance, and information science book programs as well as the professional business list in North America. | | Prior to Emerald, Charlotte was a business trade... Read More →
avatar for Gita Manaktala

Gita Manaktala

Editorial Director, MIT Press
Gita Manaktala is Editorial Director of the MIT Press, a publisher of scholarship at the intersection of the arts, sciences, and technology. Known for intellectual daring and distinctive design, MIT Press books push the frontiers of new knowledge in fields ranging from contemporary... Read More →
avatar for Matthew W. Ragas

Matthew W. Ragas

Associate Professor, College of Communication, DePaul University
Matt Ragas, Ph.D. is an associate professor and academic director of the public relations and advertising graduate program in the College of Communication at DePaul University in Chicago. An award-winning teacher, researcher and student adviser, he teaches and researches at the intersection... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Wesolek

Andrew Wesolek

Head of Digital Scholarship, Clemson University
Andrew Wesolek serves as Head of Digital Scholarship at Clemson University. In this role, he captures the intellectual output of Clemson University and works to make it openly available to any researcher with an internet connection. He also works closely with Clemson University Press... Read More →



Monday November 6, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Understanding the Library Market
Registration Cost: $150

Sponsored by Taylor & Francis

Podcast with Session Preview 


Attention publishers and vendors of library-related materials, we have a workshop just for you! We’ll discuss how to target libraries that will buy your publications, making your marketing budget effective, improving your understanding of the library market, and using library associations to focus your spending. Learn from veterans in the field how libraries buy, who are the library buyers, and how purchasing decisions are made. You can’t afford to miss out on this workshop focused on the library market at the premier international annual library conference focused on book, serial, and electronic resource acquisition. All the major decision makers will be there, and so should you!

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Erin Gallagher

Erin Gallagher

Director of Collection Services, Reed College
Erin Gallagher is the Director of Collection Services at Reed College in lovely Portland, Oregon. Before that, she worked as the E-Resources & Serials Librarian at Rollins College in beautiful Orlando, Florida. Erin started her library career on the vendor side as a collection development... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

Consultant, IOS Press
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is Managing Partner of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Taylor & Francis

Taylor & Francis

As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks, and reference works, Taylor & Francis Group helps bring knowledge to life by providing researchers and students with the highest quality information across a range of specialties in Humanities, Social... Read More →



Monday November 6, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Tuesday, November 7
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/6, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/9, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/10: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Tuesday November 7, 2017 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Developing a Weighted Collection Development Allocation Formula
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview


This practical workshop is geared primarily toward librarians who are looking for ways to optimize their limited collection development budgets and/or are revisiting their allocation procedures with an eye toward distributing funds to their various academic disciplines or departments in a more equitable and justifiable way.

Bailey, Creibaum, and Holloway will address the process of creating a weighted allocation formula similar to the one used for over 15 years at Arkansas State University. The presenters will introduce attendees to the skills and resources needed to manage their own Excel spreadsheet-based allocation formula.

The use of weights applied to each factor is a central feature of this formula. Potential factors may include the number of degrees awarded in each program, departmental semester credit hour production, the number of faculty in each department, and the average cost of resources in each discipline, among others.

Participants who bring their tablets or laptops will be able to download and work with a fully functioning simplified version of the Excel formula during the session.

The presenters will discuss various reasons an allocation formula might need to be changed and demonstrate how their basic formula can be modified to utilize the criteria relevant to other institutions. Real-time examples will be used to show how seemingly small changes in the formula can produce major changes in results.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity.  In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services... Read More →
avatar for Linda Creibaum

Linda Creibaum

Acquisitions and Serials Librarian, Arkansas State University
Linda Creibaum is Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Arkansas State University, where for the last 15 years she has been fascinated at the change in library resource formats and the nature of the “problems” she solves in her work day. Linda has worked in a variety of library... Read More →
avatar for Star Holloway

Star Holloway

Serials Access Librarian, Arkansas State University
Star is the Serials Access Librarian at the Dean B. Ellis Library. She also does collection development for the Media and Theatre departments and spends some time at the information desk. She received her M.S. in Information Science from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville and her... Read More →



Tuesday November 7, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Electronic Resource Management
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast Preview


Libraries and librarians are being pressured to work smarter and more efficiently. How does one manage the library’s resources when we are adding new faculty, new courses, increasing numbers of students, users are shifting to e-resources, and we are told cut our materials budget? What are other institutions and publishers doing to help you?

Upgrade your experience by learning some approaches from a panel of three publishers and four librarians, and by sharing your experiences at this interactive session. We will focus on set up, access, technology, delivery, and organizational constraints. What works and what doesn’t work?

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Bock

Rachel Bock

Senior Manager, Product Management, Wiley
Rachel Bock leads a team of product managers who are responsible for product lifecycle management from concept to sunsetting for Wiley Online Library and other products related to society and proprietary content delivery.
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor Emeritus, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Nels Rune Jensen

Nels Rune Jensen

Co-Founder, ConsortiaManager
avatar for Virginia Martin

Virginia Martin

Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions, Duke University Libraries
Virginia Martin is Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions Department at Duke University Libraries. Previously, she held positions as Electronic Resource Acquisitions Coordinator at Duke University Libraries and as Head of Electronic & Continuing Resources Acquisitions at Joyner Library... Read More →
avatar for Kasia Stasik

Kasia Stasik

Harrassowitz
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy


Tuesday November 7, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Sharing and Discovery ‘Without Good Metadata, What is the Cost to Society? What Discoveries Are We Missing?’
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview


Everyone in the scholarly communications community has a vested interest in enhancing and improving shared metadata in order to make scholarly content even more discoverable.
Enriched metadata is fundamental to the improvement of publication and dataset linkage, and ultimately, to effective discovery. A group of organizations from all over the world have come together to rally the community around this critical issue in scholarly communications: sharing richer metadata. Metadata 2020 is a community effort to jointly advance the quality of Metadata in scholarly works for the benefit of researchers, funders, publishers, service providers, and librarians.

This panel discussion and workshop provides insight into the current challenges with improving metadata and opportunities that improvements present. Speakers outline some of these opportunities, demonstrate the uses of rich metadata, discuss some of the current limitations, and suggest ways that different communities within scholarly communications can commit to improving metadata. Representatives from research faculty, libraries, publishers, service providers, funders, and new initiatives present their perspectives, and engage attendees in a larger discussion about how we might better work together and improve communication to improve metadata in a way that will be most useful to the community.

Working together we can build on existing efforts to make research more discoverable.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Brewer

Michelle Brewer

Medical Librarian and Manager, Market Intelligence, Wolters Kluwer Health
Keen interests include libraries of all types, research and education. I enjoy examining and synthesizing new ideas, paradigm changes and innovations both inside and outside the information marketplace in a variety of professional disciplines and industries.Michelle Brewer is the... Read More →
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Product Research & Development Affiliate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
I bring 15+ years publishing experience to my work with a variety of global information organizations and partners, dedicated to advancing knowledge and driving product innovations that ensure positive and effective researcher experiences. As a senior Maverick associate and independent... Read More →
JK

Jennifer Kemp

Head of Business Development, Crossref
Jennifer Kemp works with organizations that use Crossref metadata. Prior to Crossref, she was most recently Senior Manager of Policy and External Relations, North America for Springer Nature, where she served previously as Manager for the eBooks Product and Americas Library Marketing... Read More →
avatar for Maryann Martone

Maryann Martone

Researcher/Scholar/Scientist, UCSD
As co-director of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, Dr. Martone has been leading the development of databases for light and electron microscopic data and new techniques and software tools to acquire and represent this knowledge within realistic neuronal mo... Read More →



Tuesday November 7, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

ProQuest Ebook Workshop: Innovation in ebook collection development & reporting
Registration Required

Evaluating acquisitions. Ensuring outcomes. Gaining user insight. These are among the top priorities and challenges of librarians seeking to build collections that will increase the value of their libraries.
Through thoughtful peer-led session, and lively, collaborative discussion, ProQuest’s Ebook Workshop will explore trends in usage-based collection development and arm with you with the tools needed to make critical decisions and implement best practices.
Key topics include:
  • Peer-led sessions on usage-based collection development, including Access-to-Own
  • A deep dive into reporting, analytics, and expenditure tracking
  • How to use ProQuest’s Patron Analytics to gain valuable user insight
  • Patron usability including a lively conversation around DRM

Seating is limited. Register now to secure your place. Lunch will be provided.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 9:00am - 1:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony and Refreshment Break
To celebrate our first year in a new location, we’re hosting a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at 10:30 am to open the Showcase with a bang. Join us in the lobby of the Gaillard Center for the ribbon cutting and enter for a chance to win one of many door prizes ranging from $100 Amazon gift cards, to Yeti insulated coffee mugs, to a wonderful variety of branded items and gift packages generously donated by our exhibitors. Boxes with entry forms will be located in the lobby of the Gaillard Center. You must be present to win, so be sure to stick around until the drawings! 

Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom and in the lobby - visit booths and browse while you eat. We'll also have a Photo Booth, sponsored by Duke University Press, available in the lobby for the duration of the Vendor Showcase to take souvenir photos with fun props.

Can't wait to see you there!

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Charleston Vendor Showcase
NEW VENUE!

Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibits. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies. We'll also have a Photo Booth, sponsored by Duke University Press, available in the lobby for the duration of the Vendor Showcase to take souvenir photos with fun props. We can't wait to see you there! 

2017 Vendor Showcase Exhibitors (PDF)

Exhibitor Map (PDF)

Alphabetical List of Participating Companies:

  •  51   1science Inc
  • 108   AAAS/Science
  •   32   Accessible Archives
  • 139   ACLS Humanities E-Book
  •  65   ACS Publications
  •  77   ACSESS – Alliance of Crop, Soil, & Environmental Science Societies
  •  94   Adam Matthew Digital
  • 126   AIP Publishing
  • 121   Alexander Street, a ProQuest Company
  • 131   Ambrose Video Publishing Inc.
  •  89   American Dental Association
  •  86   American Economic Association
  •  87   American Physiological Society
  •  40   American Psychological Association
  •  6   American Society for Microbiology
  • 136   American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
  •  17   American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
  • 106   Annual Reviews
  • 102   Apex CoVantage
  •  23   ARM Education
  •  59   Artstor
  •  7   Association for Computing Machinery
  •  70   ASTM International
  •  90   Begell House, Inc. Publishers
  • 138   Bentham Science Publishers
  • 124   Better World Books
  •  43   Bevara Technologies
  •  21   BioOne
  • 141   Bloomsbury Digital Resources
  • 142   BMJ
  •  61   Brepols Publishers
  •  30   British Online Archives
  •  78   Bureau van Dijk, a Moody’s Analytics company
  • 125   Business Expert Press
  • 140   Cambridge University Press
  •  37   Canadian Science Publishing
  •  42   Casalini Libri
  • 133   Choice
  •  56   The Chronicle of Higher Education
  • 143   Clarivate Analytics
  • 129   CLOCKSS Archive
  • 120   Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
  • 137   Columbia University Press
  •  34   The Company of Biologists
  •  76   Credo Reference
  •  8   Data-Planet
  •  88   De Gruyter, Inc.
  •  99   Demco Software
  •  82   Docuseek2
  •  53   Duke University Press
  •  49   East View Information Services
  •  10   EBSCO Information Services
  •  16   Economist Intelligence Unit
  •  64   Edward Elgar Publishing Inc.
  • 135   The Electrochemical Society
  •  74   ELSEVIER
  •  39   Emerald Publishing
  •  80   Euromonitor International
  • 122   Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
  •  93   Gale, a Cengage Company
  •  21   Geological Society of London
  •  84   GeoScienceWorld
  •  9   GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO
  •  52   Harrassowitz Booksellers & Subscription Agents
  •  50   Hindawi Limited
  •  23   ICE Publishing
  •  73   IGI Global
  •  14   Infobase
  •  24   Ingenta
  •  11   Innovative
  •  62   The Institution of Engineering and Technology
  •  57   InteLex Corporation
  • 111   International Monetary Fund
  • 130   IOP Publishing
  • 58   Ithaka S+R
  • 92   The JAMA Network
  • 85   JoVE
  • 58   JSTOR
  • 97   Kanopy
  • 67   Karger Publishers
  • 3   Library Juice Academy
  • 20   LM Information Delivery
  • 75   LYRASIS
  • 107   Mango Languages
  • 91   Mark Allen Group
  • 18   Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  • 13   McGraw-Hill Education
  • 44   MDPI AG
  • 55   Mergent, Inc.
  • 19   Midwest Library Service
  • 54   The MIT Press
  • 119   Modern Language Association
  • 125   Momentum Press
  • 112   Morgan & Claypool Publishers
  • 105   New Day Films
  • 69   OCLC
  • 60   ODILO
  • 22   OECD
  • 117   OSA – The Optical Society
  • 109   Oxford University Press
  • 132   Paratext
  • 31   Penn State University Press
  • 128   Peter Lang Publishing
  • 114   PolicyMap Inc.
  • 58   Portico
  • 38   Prenax Inc.
  • 29   Project MUSE
  • 123   ProQuest
  • 1   Publisher Solutions International Limited
  • 24   Publishers Communication Group
  • 35   Readex / NewsBank
  • 101   RedLink
  • 45   Reference USA
  • 110   Reprints Desk, Inc.
  • 15   Rittenhouse Book Distributors
  • 5   Rockefeller University Press
  • 134   Rowman & Littlefield
  • 22   Royal Society of London Publishing
  • 72   S&P Global Market Intelligence
  • 115   SAE International
  • 95   SAGE Publishing
  • 127   The Seismological Society of America
  • 81   SimplyAnalytics
  • 2   SirsiDynix
  • 68   Skillsoft Books
  • 46   Society of Exploration Geophysicists
  • 83   SPIE Digital Library
  • 113   Springer Nature
  • 41   Springshare
  • 47   ST Imaging
  • 63   Statista Inc.
  • 33   Swank Digital Campus
  • 26   Taylor & Francis Group
  • 27   Taylor & Francis Group
  • 28   Taylor & Francis Group
  • 100   Teton Data Systems (STAT!Ref)
  • 66   Thieme Publishers
  • 25   University of Chicago Press
  • 4   University of Toronto Press Journals
  • 118   University of Virginia Press
  • 48   University of Wisconsin Press
  • 144   Wall Street Journal
  • 116   Westchester Publishing Services
  • 103   Wiley
  • 104   Wiley
  • 36   William S. Hein & Co., Inc.
  • 71   Wolters Kluwer
  • 79  

Tuesday November 7, 2017 10:30am - 6:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Luncheon
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be located in the exhibits in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:30pm

Publishers are not the enemy: A workshop on publishers and libraries cooperating with e-books for mutual benefit
Registation Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview

Organizers:
 John Lavender, Consultant, Lavender Consulting; Jackie Ricords, IGI Global,  Director of E-Resources;  Lettie Conrad, Senior Associate, Maverick Publishing Specialists.

With ever tightening budgets libraries are looking at how they can maintain their print collections by getting the best value, buying books that their users want, stimulating usage and looking for new ways the library can help in providing teaching materials. This workshop discusses three areas where cooperation between publishers and libraries can work to the benefit of both and has presentations from both parties.
  1. Evidence Based Acquisition (EBA) has become a popular new tool for libraries but how does it work in practice and what are the pitfalls. Librarians and publishers will detail programs they have worked on (including EBA for print books), what the issues were and how they were overcome.
  2. Textbooks have historically not been an area that libraries have embraced but with price pressure and technical developments how can a library be used as a source of course textbooks without destroying the publishers business model.
  3. Many libraries acquire large collections of e-books. Both libraries and publishers have an interest in getting the widest use of these collections, but what practical steps can we take to make sure the collections and updates can easily be included in a library’s system? How we can help the e-books get to the users who need them?
Everyone who attend this workshop, either librarian or publisher, should leave the session with practical ideas about how they can use what they have heard. Participants will leave with relevant handouts and will have the opportunity to be profiled in the Library Technology Innovation series.

Moderators
avatar for John Lavender

John Lavender

Consultant, Lavender Consulting/Maverick Publishing Specialists
Lavender-Consulting is run by John Lavender, a publisher with almost 40 years' experience in academic and scientific publishing. John has worked with books, databases and journals, and in editorial, sales, marketing, electronic content and delivery, business development and in negotiating... Read More →
avatar for Jackie Ricords

Jackie Ricords

Director of E-Resources, IGI Global
Jackie Ricords leads IGI Global’s e-resources and consortia outreach efforts. Prior to joining the STM publisher, she worked in higher education for more than a decade teaching and directing professional development programs for educators. Jackie has expertise in digital resources... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chris Box

Chris Box

Head, E-book Program, IOP Publishing
Chris is Head of Sales Operations at IOP Publishing. Within his role, Chris was the product manager for the IOP ebooks program since launch and also | manages the Customer Services, Licensing & Fulfilment and Analytics teams.
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development & Management Librarian, Portland State University
I am the Collection Development Librarian at Portland State University Library and have over 20 years of academic library experience. I have held leadership positions in ALA ALCTS, ER&L, and NASIG. In 2015, I was appointed as the ALA-NISO representative to vote on NISO/ISO standards... Read More →
AF

Amy Filiatreau

Director of the Library, Lynn University
avatar for Steven Harris

Steven Harris

Assistant Dean of Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno
Steven is Assistant Dean of Libraries at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the administrative manager for collections, acquisitions, cataloging and metadata, discovery services (technical services), digital initiatives, and library IT.
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
I enjoy talking about all things geek, and exploring new food and beer places. Oh, I also enjoy talking UX for e-resource access and best ways to wrangle metadata into something useful.
avatar for Ryan Johnson

Ryan Johnson

Head, Department of Collections, Research & Instruction, Georgetown University
avatar for Rick Misra

Rick Misra

Senior Product Manager, ScienceDirect, Elsevier
Rick Misra is a Sr. Product Manager for the ScienceDirect group focused on developing the Reading Experience. He received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of Illinois and also holds positions as a Collaborating Scientist at the Scripps Research Institute where he also... Read More →
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP - Market Development, Books, ProQuest
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I am also Project Team member on the Mellon Funded Charlotte Initiative which focuses on the future of the Academic eBook Market. My presentations at Charleston this year, will focus mostly on usage statistics and... Read More →
AS

Andrew Smith

Senior Product Manager, Emerald Group
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue... Read More →



Tuesday November 7, 2017 12:30pm - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Negotiating with Vendors
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview


The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
A long-time attendee of the Charleston Conference, I lead SCELC, a library consortium based in downtown Los Angeles. Since SCELC is very active in licensing e-resources I have spoken at past pre-conferences on negotiation and on e-resource management. I enjoy talking about consortia... Read More →
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

Consultant, IOS Press
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is Managing Partner of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years... Read More →
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor Emeritus, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Marjorie M. K. Hlava

Marjorie M. K. Hlava

President, Access Innovations
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organization... Read More →
WS

Ward Shaw

Independent Investor
Ward Shaw is a private investor and frequent contributor within the scholarly information community. Previously, he founded and owned the CARL Corporation and UnCover Inc., and served as Chairman and CEO of those companies. He was Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Strauch

Bruce Strauch

Professor of Business Law, The Citadel
Bruce Strauch, J.D. is a Professor of Business Law and Director of the Citadel Mentors Program. He holds degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill and Oxford, is extensively published in the field of copyright and trademark, is the author of nine novels and the publisher of a trade journal of... Read More →
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy



Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Prospecting User Perspectives and Practices for Past Trends and Future Predictions
Registration Cost: $150

Podcast with Session Preview


Libraries and publishers alike are struggling to get an accurate read on what our information users are doing on our sites and how to make the most of our user research data and outcomes. It is common to do user surveys, snapshot analysis, etc. to develop insight into user perspectives and practices. These episodic assessments have great value in continuous improvement and evaluation of user experience and satisfaction. However, prospecting these episodic studies across time and place generates opportunity for even greater impact, particularly when contextualized by national or international trend analysis.
This preconference will present strategies and tools for identifying existing data, approaches for longitudinal and trend analysis, and planning for ongoing analysis in a continuous improvement framework. The session will draw on the work of the two facilitators as case studies of how such trend analysis can be approached within libraries and publishing houses. At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a conceptual analysis of more than a decade of user surveys surfaced longitudinal trends across different survey instruments. And, “Headlines from the Discovery Files” (Learned Publishing, 2017), demonstrates a publisher application of qualitative coding to reveal larger contextual trends about information users.
Through these case studies and some coping practice exercises during the preconference, participants will be prepared to:
  • Identify local, national, and international episodic studies that are relevant to a particular topic of interest related to information users.
  • Design an analysis approach that integrates data across time and place.
  • Leverage findings to drive evidence-based decision making.
  • Elevate your organization’s data-driven strategies without significant expenditure.

Speakers
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Product Research & Development Affiliate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
I bring 15+ years publishing experience to my work with a variety of global information organizations and partners, dedicated to advancing knowledge and driving product innovations that ensure positive and effective researcher experiences. As a senior Maverick associate and independent... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Information Literacy, Library Assessment, Value of Academic Libraries, Inclusion, Mentoring



Tuesday November 7, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Join us for an afternoon snack at the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.

Sponsors
avatar for Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP)

Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP)

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP), founded in 1978, is a nonprofit organization formed to promote and advance communication among all sectors of the scholarly publication community through networking, information dissemination, and facilitation of new developments in the... Read More →


Tuesday November 7, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:00pm

Welcome Reception
Join us at the Vendor Showcase for wine and appetizers to start the Conference off right!

Sponsors
avatar for Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew

Award-winning publisher of primary source collections from archives around the world. Collections are designed to enhance research using transformative technology including Handwritten Text Recognition for manuscripts.


Tuesday November 7, 2017 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees. If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Caroline Goldsmith (caroline@charlestonlibraryconference.com).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Tuesday November 7, 2017 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBD

5:30pm

Charleston Culinary Tour
Tour is full.

This 2.5 hour tour offers insight into Charleston’s Upper King Street historic neighborhood (recently named one of the top 10 food neighborhoods in America!) and surrounding area, showcasing four of Charleston’s culinary innovators who exemplify cooking in the New South!
The Upper King Street district has emerged as an area with tremendous energy; showcasing culinary innovation, experimental design and boutique shopping. The restaurants featured in the tour are trailblazers in Charleston’s culinary scene, edgy and innovative, with tremendous passion for their craft. This tour is designed to show off some of the best that Charleston has to offer and provide insight into Charleston’s ever-changing culinary scene. TOUR INCLUDES:
  • All food and non-alcoholic beverage tastings
  • Enough food to make a meal for most
PLEASE REMEMBER:
  • Tours are held rain or shine
  • These are walking tours, and historic Charleston has a number of very uneven cobblestone streets and sidewalks. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothing
  • Each tour is unique as destinations rotate according to restaurant availability.
Meeting Location: HoM Charleston563 King St, Charleston, SC 29403

Tuesday November 7, 2017 5:30pm - 8:00pm
HoM Charleston 563 King St, Charleston, SC 29403

7:00pm

First Time Attendees and 'Up and Comers' Reception
RSVP to let us know you'll be attending!

We're inviting all first-time attendees of the conference, as well as any "Up and Comer" award winners that are attending to join us for a welcome reception. Our conference mentors and some of our conference directors will be there to say hello, and to answer questions you may have in advance of the main conference.


Tuesday November 7, 2017 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Wednesday, November 8
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/6, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/9, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/10: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Wednesday November 8, 2017 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors

Wednesday November 8, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:30am

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:30am - 8:35am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:35am

21st Century Academic Library: The promise, the plan, a response.
Loretta Parham will discuss the requirements for today’s academic library, the need for a vision and the role of planning and the promise for execution. Also shared will be the story of the Atlanta University Center Woodruff, recipient of the 2016 ACRL Academic Library of Excellence award.

Moderators
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Assistant Director of Administrative Collection Management, Tennessee State University
I am Associate Professor at the Brown-Daniel Library, an HBCU in Nashville, TN. My responsibilities include databases, books, serials, cataloging, document delivery and preservation. I also manage the link resolver and the electronic resource management system. My column in Against... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Loretta Parham

Loretta Parham

CEO and Director, Atlanta University Center (AUC) Robert W. Woodruff Library
Loretta Parham is the 2017 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year. Provided by GOBI Library Solutions (EBSCO), this award recognizes a librarian who has made extraordinary national and international contributions to academic libraries and librarianship. As CEO and Director... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 8:35am - 9:15am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:15am

Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Scholarship Award Presentation
Cynthia Graham Hurd was a librarian for over 31 years in Charleston public and academic libraries. She worked as the branch manager of the popular St. Andrews Regional Library, and as a part-time reference librarian at the College of Charleston. On June 17, 2015, her life ended when a lone gunman entered the historic Emanuel AME Church and killed nine people during a prayer meeting. Cynthia is remembered as a “tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.”

Springer Nature is proud to honor the legacy of Cynthia Graham Hurd by awarding a scholarship to a librarian who has demonstrated an active interest in the profession, but has not had an opportunity to attend the Charleston Library Conference due to lack of institutional funding.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 9:15am - 9:20am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:20am

The Future of Print in Open Stacks: a Proposal
In a lightning plenary, Jim O’Donnell, University Librarian at Arizona State University, will invite interest in a discussion of the future of the open stack print collection.  Which books should readers encounter in our buildings?  How should they be presented?  Are call numbers the only way to organize them?  Should collections rotate?  He will invite conference-goers to a Lively Lunch on Thursday to share ideas and sign up possible co-conspirators in a continuing discussion.

Jim is the longest-serving open access e-journal publisher in the humanities (Bryn Mawr Classical Review since 1990), is a distinguished scholar, was provost at Georgetown, and now leads the university library in America’s most innovative university.

Speakers
avatar for Jim O'Donnell

Jim O'Donnell

University Librarian, Arizona State University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 9:20am - 9:30am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:30am

Technology and Platforms: What's On the Horizon
Join us for a plenary presentation about technology platforms and features that librarians (and researchers and users) should be expecting in the next few years.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Georgios Papadopoulos

Georgios Papadopoulos

Founder and CEO, Atypon
Georgios is Atypon’s founder and CEO. Atypon's Literatum platform will be underlying 40% of all scholarly content ever published. Georgios has enough of a technical background to explain what the technologists are building in their labs for the next generation of publishing platforms... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:00am

Refreshment Break
Sponsors
avatar for American Mathematical Society

American Mathematical Society

MathSciNet, published by the American Mathematical Society (AMS), is a carefully maintained, easily searchable database of reviews, abstracts and bibliographic information for mathematical literature.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:00am - 10:20am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

PrePrints, IRs & the Version of Record
Since arXiv launched twenty five years ago, many have wondered why other disciplines have been slow to follow their lead. Now the landscape is changing with the opportunity for preprints to play a significant role in the scholarly publishing landscape.

Three significant changes in the last 12 months signal a tipping point for preprints and elevated their role in the scholarly publication lifecycle. 1) In November 2016, Crossref announced the decision to support registration of DOIs for preprints making the author’s work citable prior to publication. 2) In January and March 2017, four prominent funders in the US and UK (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council of UK and the NIH announced policies allowing preprints to be cited in grant applications and reports. 3) In April 2017, CZI (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) announced that they are investing in BioRxiv, the preprint server from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

On the occasion of the 25th anniversary, arXiv (physics) is being enhanced, the American Chemical Societies is planning to launch ChemRxiv (chemistry) and BioRxiv has funding to further develop its rapidly growing services for the life sciences. In addition, software developed by the Center for Open Science has enabled the launch of several new servers in the social sciences, agriculture and engineering.

What does the widespread adoption of preprints mean for the version of record? What are the implications for libraries and institutional repositories? What standards and best practices are necessary to optimize the value of preprint servers?

The perspectives of a scholar/publisher (BioRxiv), institutional repository librarian (TBD), and metadata provider (Crossref) will provide a coherent view of the current state and outlook for preprints.

Moderators
avatar for Judy Luther

Judy Luther

President, Informed Strategies LLC
Professionally I'm passionate about good design of content that meets the needs of the users. Personally I love being outdoors in nature and enjoy quiet moments with a good cup of tea.

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Anderson

Ivy Anderson

Associate Executive Director, California Digital Library
Ivy Anderson is the Associate Executive Director and Director of Collection Development at the California Digital Library (CDL), where she oversees a broad range of shared collections activities on behalf of the ten campuses of the University of California system. Before coming to... Read More →
avatar for Monica Bradford

Monica Bradford

Executive Editor, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Monica Bradford is the Executive Editor of the international journal Science, published by AAAS. In this position, she oversees the peer-review and selection of manuscripts and the copyediting and proofreading process for four journals: Science, Science Advances, Science Signaling... Read More →
avatar for John Inglis

John Inglis

Executive Director, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Dr. John Inglis is the co-founder of bioRxiv, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s preprint service for the life sciences. He is also the founding Executive Director and Publisher of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press in New York, a not-for-profit publisher of journals, books, and online... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

Publication Ethics, Today’s Challenges: Navigating and Combating Questionable Practices
Publishers, societies and institutions along with their editors, faculty, authors, librarians, scientists and researchers are all facing a scholarly ecosystem that is challenged by reproducibility issues, fake news, bogus editors and editorial boards, fake authors and peer reviewers, fictitious conferences and predatory journals-- to mention just a few. And these issues continue to grow. Reputable stakeholders have solutions, progress and ideas to address many ethical concerns for everyone involved in research and publication. Reproducibility requirements, data access, transparency, peer review, education, outreach, white lists and more help combat dodgy practices, manage the publication process to assure the scholarly record is of the highest quality for future generations. This panel will create a discussion on publication ethics and the efforts of key diverse stakeholders to improve and enhance scientific integrity —including a commercial publisher, a society and an academic library. This forum’s ideas, knowledge and perspectives on ethical publication and research practices hopes to further collaboration and transparency among all stakeholders with this key issue facing scholarly communication today.

Moderators
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director and recruiter/compiler of conference session... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Lunn

Jenny Lunn

Director, Publications, American Geophysical Union
avatar for Duncan MacRae

Duncan MacRae

Director, Open Access, Editorial, Wolters Kluwer
avatar for Jayne Marks

Jayne Marks

VP Global Publishing, Wolters Kluwer



Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

Wide Open or Just Ajar? Evaluating Real User Metrics in Open Access
The role of libraries in Open Access publishing is shifting from purchasing content to helping researchers in the publication process. It is of the greatest importance for all stakeholders to understanding the full potential impact, from the planning of a project (for APC funding applications, for example) to post-publication, demonstrating the full reach and significance of the published work.

It is of course relatively straightforward to check and audit metrics relating to book and journal content which is purchased or subscribed to. However, the full value of Open Access publications in terms of impact is much harder for librarians and publishers to evaluate. Simply quantifying download metrics for OA journals and books is one thing, but going forward evaluating what statistics actually signify in terms of readership, citation, (re)usage and sharing is much harder, as is the manner in which impact is recorded and reported. How can real impact factors and success criteria be assessed when dealing with OA content?

Thinking through the opportunities and challenges of collecting and managing usage data; working collaboratively with publishers and research funders to develop new tools and standards for mapping and reporting on the true value of Open Access content; these are key to growth and sustainability in the Open Access environment. The panel will explore the current state of play and innovation in this field.

Moderators
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy Brand

Amy Brand

Director, MIT Press
Amy Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Previously, she served as VP Academic and Research Relations and VP North America at Digital Science. From 2008 to 2013, Brand worked at Harvard University, first as Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication... Read More →
avatar for Hillary Corbett

Hillary Corbett

Director, Scholarly Communication and Digital Publishing, Northeastern University Libraries
Hillary Corbett is the Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Publishing at Northeastern University Libraries in Boston, Massachusetts, where she has worked in several roles since 2005. She also serves as the university’s Copyright Officer, providing assistance to faculty... Read More →
avatar for Byron Russell

Byron Russell

Head, Ingenta Connect, Ingenta
As Head of Ingenta Connect, I provide overall leadership and management of the commercial activities for Ingenta's flagship product, Ingenta Connect, providing content management solutions to 250+ publisher clients and 25,000 registered academic libraries. We've just launched Ingenta... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

A Trouble Shared... Collaborative Approaches to Addressing the Problems Affecting Measurement of E-Resource Usage Data
Academic libraries throughout the World require accurate and reliable usage data. Requirements include demonstrating a return on investment for costly e-resources, access to data to support policy and planning processes, to benchmark against comparable organisations and to support advocacy.

Gathering, managing, measuring and analysing usage data to support each of these processes is imperative. However, such activities are time consuming and involve significant duplication of effort, with libraries across the World replicating similar tasks. Additionally, access to accurate and consistent data can be problematic, impacting upon opportunities for comparison and benchmarking.

Rather than trying to tackle these challenges in isolation, collaboration across organisations and nations can offer a powerful force for change. Jisc, the UK higher, further education and skills sectors’ organisation for digital services and solutions has partnered with universities and organisations in the UK, USA and Australia and New Zealand to explore the challenges around consistently measuring and monitoring usage and impact. Jisc provides access to library analytics tools to support communities in accessing, analysing, evaluating and reporting on e-resource data. Working with these existing tools, whilst fostering new relationships and collaborations has enabled teams to work internationally to address global issues.

Focusing on several case studies, this session will outline some recent achievements to highlight the benefits of collaboration, to indicate what can be achieved more successfully in partnership than alone, to demonstrate lessons learned and to offer some useful tips for anyone embarking on a similar initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Ross MacIntyre

Ross MacIntyre

Head of Library Analytics Services, JISC
ROSS MacINTYRE works for Jisc as Head of Library Analytics Services. Ross is the Service Manager for the 'Web of Knowledge Service for UK Education', 'Europe PubMed Central plus', JUSP (Jisc's Journal Usage Statistics Portal) and IRUS-UK (Institutional Repository Usage Statistics... Read More →
avatar for Jill Morris

Jill Morris

Associate Director, PALCI - The Pennsylvania Academic Library Consortium, Inc
I advocate for and build collaboration among PALCI's 68 academic member libraries while leading strategic development and management of key consortium programs, including eResources, eBooks, affordable learning, resource sharing and supporting technologies, with particular emphasis... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

After the Prologue for Three State University Libraries: Writing the Story to a Streamlined Future as One University
While the past may be prologue, the future story of our libraries may be a tragedy, or perhaps just a mystery. Or one hopes, a happy ending - the story is now being written. Like many state university library systems, the three University of Alaska campus libraries are struggling with institutional downsizing, budget cuts, and branch closures. The State of Alaska is in the biggest recession since the 1980s, resulting in major reductions in legislative funding to higher education, significantly impacting university libraries. What’s different this time is the future story; as we reach the predicted end of oil there may never be a full economic recovery. How can libraries work together to create a new and different future for higher education on the Last Frontier?

This participatory presentation will focus on ways the three campus library systems are already working individually and cooperatively to find our way forward in this budget climate. We’ll discuss how top-down strategic planning, directed by higher administration, affects our collections, subscriptions, major purchases, consortial efforts, instruction programs, and more, while we likely move from three universities to one with three specialty campuses. Our libraries have always cooperated, but now we are challenged to figure out how our institutions can be best served by “one library,” what the components of that library should be, and where we all fit into that plan. Following the presentation, audience members will be invited to participate in an open discussion, sharing their own ideas and solutions, and will leave with ideas suitable for their own circumstances.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Jensen

Karen Jensen

Collection Development, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Officially I'm an Associate Professor of Library Science, I teach a library instruction credit course for first-years, do course-integrated instruction, oversee all collection development functions including outreach, product trials, selection, acquisition and promotion of resources... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Approval Plans: An Apology
Rick Lugg, Executive Director, OCLC Sustainable Collection Services, and Bob Nardini, Vice President, Library Services, ProQuest Books, have taken different paths, but once were colleagues at a company called Yankee Book Peddler, where they had something to do with what became routine use of approval plans in all but the smallest North American academic libraries. Pamela Grudzien, Director of Acquisitions, Metadata and Resource Sharing Services at Central Michigan University, oversaw one of those approval plans.
Now Rick runs a business helping libraries incorporate usage data into the management of print book collections, while Bob, still working with approval plans, is at the same time immersed in providing demand-driven collection options. While Pamela still puts some print books onto her shelves, she also works with Rick to take others away.
Over the years Pamela, Rick, and Bob have worked with one another everything changed for academic libraries, their economic, technological, and physical environments; the demands of their users; the nature of their collections; the work of their staffs; and perhaps above all, the culture in which they exist.
They’re not really going to apologize, but Rick and Bob will reflect on all the print books they helped put into libraries through approval plans – many of which they fear haven’t been touched since placed on the shelf. They hope, in this session, Pamela will accept their not-quite-an-apology. Then our speakers will draw on decades of experience to relate how and why so many academic libraries first adopted, and then turned away from or radically changed their library and vendor-driven collection development approach to the user-driven approach still emerging today, while offering thoughts on what librarians starting careers today will see in the years ahead.

Speakers
PG

Pamela Grudzien

Director of Acquisitions, Metadata and Resource Sharing Services, Central Michigan University Libraries
Pamela has many years of library experience in public services, collection development, resource sharing, and more recently, technical services.  This varied experience has provided her with a well-rounded perspective of academic library services, challenges, and opportunities. Her... Read More →
avatar for Rick Lugg

Rick Lugg

Executive Director, OCLC Sustainable Collection Services, OCLC
Decision support for print book collections
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President Library Services, ProQuest



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Between Rare and Commonplace: Closing the Venn Diagram of Special and General Collections
A presentation of the legacy of collaboration and expanding integration of work between Special and General Collections at the Brown University Library. As a clear strategic direction, the Library has historically prioritized and continues to promote a measured integration of special collections and general collections workflows. As such, more and more processing, training, data sharing, and programming within Special and General Collections are seen and acted upon as a unified whole.

This initiative derives from a legacy of shared responsibility for archival processing, metadata and linked-data, and preservation that emerged as much out of necessity as of a spirit of collaboration. Currently, staff in the John Hay Library (Special Collections) and the Rockefeller Library (General) are occupied in large scale collection management projects involving staff coordination, integrated workflows, and cooperative training across units. Cross-departmental initiatives like Diversity & Inclusion Planning, hiring, and staff development require improved communication across fields and attention to distributed needs..

Such a direction in not unique to Brown and present an array of unanswered questions. Among such are: How can special collections and general collections support each other in a way that is sustainable in an era of budget cuts, staff changes, and diminished returns? What can staff, and administration learn from each other, and what information is useful to achieve greater understanding of faculty and students needs? What data and narrative is needed to better address those crucial issues?

This session will start to answer some of these questions, presenting specific case studies that look at how we might work together for mutual benefit.

Speakers
CG

Christopher Geissler

Director of the John Hay Library & Special Collections, Brown University Library
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management, Brown University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is the Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management at Brown University Library. In this role, he oversees the allocation and expenditure of the Libraries' collections budget, and the ongoing management of services and staff that advance... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Elsevier and bepress: Let’s Go There
This summer’s news of Elsevier acquiring bepress shocked the community and prompted questions about the future of both companies. While some bepress customers are excited about what this means for the development and longevity of the platform, others have concerns that the service model and culture of bepress will be lost. In this session, Jean-Gabriel Bankier, President and CEO of bepress, will address these reactions head-on. He will outline bepress’s unchanged business, support, and service model, and plans for product improvements. He will also discuss the ways that bepress is working with Elsevier to change the conversation around open access and the library’s value on campus. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of the transition from the inside, as well as what it means for customers and the larger community.

Moderators
TB

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of University Libraries, and Head of Electronic Resources and Information Technologies, UNC Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Managing Director, bepress
IR success metrics and bench marking | Faculty profiles | Author readership dashboards


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Finding the Right Mix: A Holistic Approach to Collection Development
When it comes to collection development, there is no magic bullet or one-size fits all solution. Today’s acquisition librarians and those charged with collection development responsibilities must navigate a wide range of options for acquiring content, all while managing a shrinking budget and limited staff. To help libraries continue to achieve their mission of collecting high quality content with dwindling resources, recent years have seen the rise of acquisition models such as DDA to help librarians acquire content based on user demand.
But with more publishers removing front list titles from DDA and costs increasing with changes in triggers, has demand driven acquisition or other usage-based models lived up to the promise of saving library budgets? How do these models and other, more traditional options such as approval plans come into play in a balanced collection development strategy?

Join our panel of librarians as they discuss:
• How libraries are using new acquisition models
• The role of DDA in their collection development strategy
• How approval plans factor into the mix
• Utilizing data and your user community to inform collection decisions
• Managing and balancing other acquisition models
• Developing a holistic strategy based on collection development goals

The panel will include librarians from both small/medium and large academic institutions to provide varying points of view. By the end of the session, attendees will have insight into these institutions’ specific approach to balancing the myriad acquisitions options available to them and the role these options play in helping them achieve their collection development goals.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Anderson

Kim Anderson

Senior Collection Development Manager, GOBI Library Solutions
Kim joined Gobi in 2010 following 35 years experience in the academic bookselling industry. He began his career in publishing then became the Mountain-Plains Regional Manager at Midwest Library Service in 1980. In 1990, he joined Blackwell as Regional Sales Manager for their Mountain-Plains... Read More →
avatar for Shannon Burke

Shannon Burke

Coordinator of Monographs and Automated Acquisitions, Texas A&M University
I have experience in the areas of electronic resources, discovery, collection development, and acquisitions. I have a particular interest in interactive data visualization, using tools such as Tableau and the R programming language, to aid in evaluation and decision-making.
EW

Eric Wedig

Coordinator of Scholarly Resources for Social Sciences, Tulane University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

History Has Its Eyes on You: Lighthouses and Libraries Weathering Storms of Change - or is being the Public Good Good Enough?
For hundreds of years, the United States has been protected by two venerable institutions. Lighthouses have served as a beacon on the shores to guide ships carrying both people and cargo to a safe harbor. Libraries have served as a beacon to guide people to books, magazines, journals, reference works, recordings and other media for enlightenment, education and enjoyment. Both lighthouses and libraries have enjoyed their status as 'public goods' with little question in regards to the rationale for funding and support. Since most ships have navigation systems and we have all library items on our smartphone (we do right???), questions are being asked about the future of these two beacons.

Change impacting both lighthouses and libraries are remarkably similar. With automation and electrification, lighthouses transitioned to low-maintenance entities and many have been turned into historical museums across the country. Libraries have seen tremendous changes as collections became increasingly electronic over the past two years. The value proposition libraries play on campuses has changed - along with their ability to support community members in the present and many years in the future. While 'what's past is prologue' helps set the scene, the reality laid before both is to adapt or 'wither away on the vine.'

In this presentation, we will look at the parallel paths taken by both lighthouses and libraries in fulfilling their self-mandated missions. To that end, we will look more closely at the meaning of a 'public good' and the demands that librarians have in supporting both current use and future use of collections as we balance between community needs and aspirations. How librarians (and lighthouse keepers) face the coming storm will have a tremendous impact on future generations of our community members.

Speakers
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

How Difficult Can It Be? Creating an integrated network among library stakeholders to promote electronic access.
Tracking electronic access is a major challenge for libraries that cannot be ignored. Vast quantities of electronic resources continue to be acquired and libraries continue to seek a way to keep up with the evolving electronic resource ecosystem.

Libraries are immersed in monitoring electronic resources for access performance, features, functionality, completeness of content and usage. Publishers, providers and vendors are immersed in their innovative business models. Users are immersed in their research needs. With these immersion silos, there is a lack of communication between stakeholders that creates an unsustainable ecosystem.

Currently, stakeholders are creating piecemeal patches that partially address access problems rather than an integrated effort of the whole community to incorporate interconnected solutions. These patches are not solving the problems. They are focusing on the symptoms, but not treating the cause. Why? The electronic access ecosystem is constantly in a state of flux. The system was simpler in times past. In this digital age, the creation, dissemination and use of data is dynamic.

It is vital to the success of the electronic access ecosystem that there be interplay between all the stakeholders. One stakeholder cannot successfully manage electronic access by itself. There needs to be a concerted effort among all stakeholders for monitoring, identifying and addressing electronic access issues. These relationships are complex. What’s hindering the communication between stakeholders? What are we doing wrong and how can it be fixed? This problem can’t be fixed overnight, but must be carefully orchestrated. Libraries need to take the lead in the development of integrated networks.

This presentation will address some of the networking problems that plague stakeholders and provide suggestions for improved networking integration. Audience participation will be sought for sharing problems and suggestions.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Branch

Denise Branch

Interim Head, Metadata and Discovery, Virginia Commonwealth University
Denise is a native of Powhatan, Virginia and the Interim Head of Metadata and Discovery at the VCU Libraries, an ARL Library. She earned her B.S. from VCU and M.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America. Managing e-resources within the Ex Libris Alma and Primo systems keeps her... Read More →
avatar for Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth

Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth

Account Services Manager, EBSCO Information Services
Jamie Gieseck-Ashworth has been an Account Services Manager (a.k.a. EBSCO traveling librarian) since 2012. She received her MLS from Kent State University in 2000. Jamie worked for 5 different OhioLINK libraries, both academic and medical, for over 14 years. Her duties covered... Read More →
avatar for Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson

Engagement Manager, Provider Relations, ProQuest
Ben Johnson is an Engagement Manager for Ex Libris Content Operations' Provider Relations team, based out of ProQuest's Seattle office. He is responsible for managing relationships with providers and to establish and improve provider data and usage across KBs and ERMs, discovery... Read More →
avatar for Anne-Marie Viola

Anne-Marie Viola

Discovery & Product Usage Manager, SAGE Publishing
I coordinate discovery-related initiatives and product usage reporting for all online products at SAGE Publishing, the leading independent academic and professional publisher. I'm interested in talking about the library discovery ecosystem and the role metadata derivatives play in... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Is it Really “Not Applicable?” Zoom in to Understand eBook Accessibility
The decisions that we make when reviewing our collections and negotiating licenses have enormous effect on our users. They also have the potential to in turn shape the priorities and decisions of publishers and platform creators. The questions we ask and standards we set now set the stage for the chapters our users inherit. And while users with special access needs might not form a large percentage of our current user population, they will always be part of that population. For eBook accessibility, it can be difficult to draw the line between what is essential, what is aspirational, and what isn’t (yet) applicable. There are numerous standards, some of which are fundamental to providing access to users, some of which you might be told don’t apply, and some which will matter more and more as the eBook changes and becomes a fuller, richer text.

Our goal in this session is to share what we’ve learned about what accessibility assessment resources publishers are likely to provide you with, what the different sections of those documents mean, how to look at the information you have and make a judgement on how accessible an ebook on a platform would be, and how to incorporate accessibility in collection selection and licensing negotiations so that ultimately the de facto design of eBooks is one that supports access by all library users.

Speakers
avatar for Danica Lewis

Danica Lewis

NCSU Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University Libraries
I'm an NCSU Libraries Fellow based in Collections & Research Strategy and with the initiative "Libraries and Public Science: Supporting the Broader Impacts of Research." My work mainly involves managing the Life Sciences collection and developing programs of library support for NSF... Read More →
avatar for xiaoyan song

xiaoyan song

E-Resource Librarian, North Carolina State University
Xiaoyan Song is the Electronic Resource Librarian (ERL) at the Monograph Unit in the Acquisition and Discovery (A&D) department at NCSU Libraries. She mingles with all aspects of ebooks including acquisition, license negotiation, activation, ebook troubleshooting, and workflow mapping... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Laying Down the Whack-a-Mole Mallet: One inexperienced ERM team's story about adopting the Agile philosophy to manage electronic resources, The Epic Saga - Part One
Electronic resource management practices are constantly changing. Even with automated holdings maintenance and community zone collections, ensuring your users have access to your resources is challenging, and no ERM system provides the all the features that teams need to complete the day to day tasks of electronic resource management.

Keeping up with title transfers, platform migrations, off campus authentication, which entity you pay for what resource, entitlements lists, linking issues, usage statistics, renewals…and the thousand tiny details that go along with everything ERM can seem a bit like playing whack-a-mole.

Librarians are gentle creatures, however, and most of us would much rather look at cute animal videos than hit one over the head with a mallet. If you work in electronic resources, you will never be caught up on all the ERM work there is to do and have a free hour to put your feet up and watch a few cute animal videos, but there is no reason we can’t try to achieve that goal!

This presentation will outline, with examples and their resulting successes and failures, the beginning stages of one new ERM team’s attempt to lay down the mallet and conquer the complexity of electronic resource management through the agile philosophy, collaboration, plenty of snacks, and yes, maybe even a cute cat video or two along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Geraldine Rinna

Geraldine Rinna

Electronic Resources Librarian, Western Michigan University
Geri is head of the Electronic Resource Management Unit, Head of Alma and Primo Administrative Groups, and is interested in Alma and Primo administration, the user experience, accessibility, and all subjects related to electronic resources management.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Libraries and the University Research Enterprise: An International Perspective
Research Information Management (RIM) is the aggregation, curation, and utilization of information about research. It is emerging as a part of scholarly communications practice in many university libraries and is a service that is typically provided in collaboration with a university’s research enterprise. RIM may interoperate with and support research repositories, researcher profiles, awards management workflows, internal reports, and external assessment. Universities have diverse goals for implementing RIM, and case studies from the US and Australia will be demonstrated in this talk.

Research university libraries are increasingly involved in RIM activities because of the expertise and value that library professionals provide to manage information relating to publications, data, persistent identifiers and so forth. Library expertise adds value in terms of connecting research information across a wide range of library-managed information sources and systems which can assist and enhance assessment activities, grant management, strategic collaborations, teaching and research planning, commercialisation and other activities.

Librarians provide knowledge and expertise which are essential for connecting up relevant applications, information and metadata within RIM systems. They provide knowledge and expertise to visualise, interpret, collect and highlight relationships between data elements in order to demonstrate and define impact and reach of institutional research collaborations and outputs. In this presentation we will share how the libraries at La Trobe and Syracuse Universities are partnering with other campus stakeholders to achieve these outcomes.

This presentation is an outcome of collaborative research by librarians practicing on three continents through the OCLC Research Library Partnership, and is part of a growing body of RIM research to support libraries, researchers, and institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research Library Partnership
Rebecca Bryant, PhD, serves as Senior Program Officer at OCLC Research where she leads collaborative research in conjunction with OCLC Research Library Partner (ORLP) libraries, related specifically to research information management (RIM) and research data management support services... Read More →
avatar for Simon Huggard

Simon Huggard

Deputy Director, Research & Collections, La Trobe University Library (Australia)
I am responsible for two major portfolios in the Library: Research and Collections. The Research team provide services to researchers to help use our electronic resources , databases and print collections, as well as providing research impact reports, advice on open access, publication... Read More →
avatar for Anne Rauh

Anne Rauh

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian, Syracuse University
Anne E. Rauh is a Collection Development and Analysis Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries. She holds a B.A. in International Studies and a M.A. in Library and Information Studies, both from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Anne is an active member of the American Society... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Mission? Permission! Opening Publications in HathiTrust from Limited to Full View at Scale.
Staff from Cornell University Library will share lessons learned during their first effort to engage the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in the HathiTrust permissions process, successfully working with the College to open over 1700 agricultural publications from limited to full view. Unique not in its goal but in its sheer scale, this first effort - in what will likely become a multi-phase project - instilled a number of lessons and highlighted new opportunities. Presenters will share challenges and solutions, practical tips, and plans for future phases of the project. Attendees can expect to learn about strategies that they may implement at their own institutions, and are encouraged to ask questions, pose ideas, raise concerns, and share experiences for the benefit of others interested in embarking on projects of a similar nature.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Cook

Michael Cook

Head of Collections, Mann Library, Cornell University
Digital collections, digital preservation, Land Grant libraries, open access, special collections.
avatar for Sarah Kennedy

Sarah Kennedy

Collection Development and Digital Collections Librarian, Cornell University Library, Mann Library
In her current role as Collection Development and Digital Collections librarian, Sarah coordinates Mann Library’s book selection process (both print and electronic) and also provides leadership for building institutional repository collections. She is also the library liaison to... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Paolillo

Michelle Paolillo

Digital Lifecycle Services Lead, Cornell University
Michelle is Cornell University's Library's Lead for Digital Lifecycle Services. She is invested in the practical logistics of digital preservation (harmonizing workflows, preservation storage, interoperability, systems design, etc.). She also serves as Cornell's HathiTrust coordinator... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Moving Beyond the Prologue: Exploring Data-centered Approaches to Prioritizing Serials Preservation
With a critical mass of journals being produced electronically, and a growing portion of those moving to e-only availability, reliable digital preservation services with broad and deep coverage have become increasingly important. As e-content has grown, so have archives such as Portico and CLOCKSS. But there is more work to be done! With the larger players accounted for, deciding which publishers and journals to target for preservation efforts can be complicated.

The Center for Research Libraries (CRL) has long been at the forefront of preservation efforts for scholarly materials in print form and has dealt with some of the issues currently being faced by digital preservation services. Over the last two years, with generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, CRL has completed a project to collect and analyze granular data on archiving and digitization of print journals and newspapers, with an ultimate goal of promoting coordinated strategic action by libraries and consortia.

In this session, attendees will learn about CRL’s Data-Centered Agenda for Preservation & Access, the challenges facing CLOCKSS and Portico as we chase the long-tail of e-publishers, and ways in which the organizations propose working together to expand on CRL’s print-based research to provide direction for ongoing digital preservation efforts. The role of other related resources, such as the Keepers Registry, from EDINA at the University of Edinburgh, and Scholar’s Portal, from the Ontario Council of University Libraries will also be discussed.

We will actively seek feedback from the audience on the CRL outcomes and our planned collective work in setting priorities for e-journal preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Van Dyck

Craig Van Dyck

Executive Director, CLOCKSS Archive
Craig Van Dyck is Executive Director of the CLOCKSS Archive, since November 2015. Previously he was with Wiley for 18 years as VP of Content Management; and with Springer New York for 10 years, most recently as Senior VP and COO. | | Craig served as Chairman of the Association... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Orphan

Stephanie Orphan

Director of Publisher Relations, Portico
Stephanie Orphan is responsible for maintaining and expanding publisher participation in the Portico preservation service to ensure ongoing growth and sustainability of the Portico archive. She joined Portico in 2007 as publisher content coordinator, prior to which she spent six... Read More →
avatar for Amy Wood

Amy Wood

Head of Technical Services, Center for Research Libraries
Amy Wood has been the Head of Technical Services at the Center for Research Libraries since 2002. She oversees cataloging and metadata production, and has led CRL's data analysis and development work on its ICON newspaper database and the Print Archives Preservation Registry. These... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Navigating Research: Do scholarly reference resources still meet users’ needs?
“The discoverability of reference resources is likely to be an ever-evolving challenge for users, librarians, and publishers.” Navigating Research: How academic users understand, discover, and utilize reference resources. Oxford University Press, June 2017, p. 17.

Last June, Oxford University Press released Navigating Research, a white paper on how academic librarians and library users view reference sources. This program will discuss the findings of that research from the perspective of a major reference publisher and a practicing academic librarian.

Simon Pawley (Market Research Department at Oxford University Press) will outline findings from the research project to explore users’ and librarians’ perspectives on the role of reference resources in research and teaching in today’s academic institutions. Based on a survey of 164 librarians and in-depth interviews with 16 librarians and 18 end-users, the report examines the role of scholarly reference in providing guidance to new topics and the scholarship relating to them, as well as assessing the factors affecting the utilization of reference resources.

David Tyckoson (Reference Librarian, California State University, Fresno) will offer a response to the research findings and discuss how they relate to patterns of usage of reference resources in his library. He will present data on the usage of reference resources in his collection that demonstrate the rise (and fall) of different kinds of reference sources. That data confirms many of the findings included in the report.

Both speakers will reflect on the findings of the report and their implications for the future. The session invites a discussion of how librarians and publishers can work to improve users’ awareness and utilization of scholarly reference resources.

Moderators
avatar for Patricia Hudson

Patricia Hudson

Associate Director of Institutional Marketing, Oxford University Press

Speakers
avatar for Simon Pawley

Simon Pawley

Market Research Assistant, Oxford University Press
At OUP, I focus on research on scholarly reference publishing. I led the research and writing of OUP's White Paper, Navigating Research: How Academic Users Understand, Discover, and utilize Reference Resources.
avatar for David Tyckoson

David Tyckoson

Research Services Librarian, California State University, Fresno
David Tyckoson is a librarian at the Henry Madden Library at California State University, Fresno. He is first and foremost a reference librarian and has written and presented extensively on reference service and reference collections. He teaches RUSA’s online class on the Reference... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

NISO KBART: The future is automation!
Today KBART is one of the industry’s most used formats for data transfer. Originally created for the transfer of data from content providers to knowledge base vendors, KBART was quickly extended to be used to update knowledge bases with library holdings data as well. In response to requests from across the discovery industry, NISO has recently created a new working group to produce recommendations to enable the automation of such updates and to build a seamless connection between the library’s local knowledge base and the information providers’ access/entitlement systems.

The goal for this automated update service is to download institutional holdings files via an API from the information provider’s website at regular intervals, transfer them to the knowledge base platform the institution is using – such as institution's link resolver – and update the knowledge base without manual intervention.

In this session, members of the two NISO KBART groups – the KBART standing committee, tasked with the maintenance of the KBART format, endorsement, and market education, and the KBART Automation Group, tasked with creating recommendations for a standardized automated transfer process – will discuss their work. This will include the results of a recent survey about the adoption of KBART II and the details, status, and practical application of the automation process. We hope for a lively discussion on KBART, its applications, and further opportunities for the future.

Speakers
avatar for C. Derrik Hiatt

C. Derrik Hiatt

Director of Resource Management & Discovery, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi
CS

Christine Stohn

Director of Product Management, Ex Libris
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Abigail Wickes

Abigail Wickes

Senior Analyst for Library & Discovery Information, Oxford University Press
ENFJ MLS working mom in Scholarly PublishingI'm the Senior Analyst for Library & Discovery Information at Oxford University Press, managing relationships with discovery partners, and working to ensure OUP metadata meets industry standards.Please talk to me about...Publisher-provided... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Open Access Funds – What Difference Do They Make?
Institutional open access funds are not new to academic libraries, but are they still relevant? How far can such a fund go towards transitioning scholarly publishing to a fully open access model? University of California Berkeley (UCB) and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) both dedicate approximately $100,000 annually towards helping authors pay open access publishing charges. Both institutions have also endorsed the goal to transition all scholarly publishing to open access through a plurality of models.

Libraries, as the coordinators of these funds, play an important role in promoting open access publishing and engaging with stakeholders on campus. The presenters will review how their funds have evolved over the years, how these funds fit into the larger ecosystem of open access publishing, and how they envision the funds in the future landscape. They will present the results of surveys of fund recipients and strategies to promote their funds.

Speakers
RS

Rachael Samberg

Scholarly Communications Officer, University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Anneliese Taylor

Anneliese Taylor

Head of Scholarly Communication, UC San Francisco
Anneliese leads scholarly communication activities at the UCSF Library. She earned her MLIS at the University of Texas @ Austin, and has held librarian positions at George Mason University in Northern Virginia and Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Anneliese is passionate about open... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Our Lives as Editors of a Predatory Journal: Lessons Learned Publishing a Scholarly Open Access Journal
As co-editors of an open access LIS journal, we manage a small, volunteer organization, and many of the practices we follow to solicit, publish, and maintain content on schedule might fit some people’s definition of predatory practices. As librarians, we understand best practices for publishing a journal, but as publishers of a small journal we are often forced to compromise. We will explore best practices for publishing an open access journal through the lens of our own experience, describe the process of migrating from one journal publishing platform to another, and reflect on how our experiences differ from “best practices.”

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Cain

Jonathan Cain

Head of Data Services, University of Oregon Libraries
Interested in digital scholarship and data, social equity, technology and diaspora communities. Information policy and access. I am interested in opportunities relating to nonprofit organizations and impact on disenfranchised populations, entrepreneurship for public benefit.
avatar for Jill Emery

Jill Emery

Collection Development & Management Librarian, Portland State University
I am the Collection Development Librarian at Portland State University Library and have over 20 years of academic library experience. I have held leadership positions in ALA ALCTS, ER&L, and NASIG. In 2015, I was appointed as the ALA-NISO representative to vote on NISO/ISO standards... Read More →
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean of Libraries, University of Denver


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Scientific Societies and Associations: A close look into what they do and why it matters for libraries
Many of the serials in an academic library are published by or in association with scientific associations and many scientific associations are made up of faculty at academic institutions. Yet society leadership and librarians rarely have opportunities to interact, communicate about their operations, or collaborate on shared goals. Moderated by a librarian, in this session, a panel of scientific society representatives will provide a close look into the inner workings of their organizations, explain how they advance research, and provide a forum for ideas on potential library/society collaborations. Specifically, they will address the following:

Publication
How do societies select manuscripts for publication? What does this process look like and how might librarians support your faculty members as they go through it?

Faculty Support
While publications are certainly a priority for many scientific societies, some list publishing as a secondary or even tertiary goal in support of scholars and discipline growth. What additional services and support do they provide their members and does there exist an opportunity for societies and librarians to collaborate in their shared mission to support faculty and research? From professional development, to creating a space for collaboration, to government advocacy, to communication with the media, policymakers and the public, the panelists will highlight the aspects of their missions that go beyond publishing.

Shared goals with librarians
Where do societies stand when it comes to issues supported – and often championed – by academic libraries such as access, discovery and transparency? Where do society and library goals overlap?

In this session, the panelists will answer these questions and more through a moderated question-and-answer panel. The panel will conclude with a rich discussion on potential opportunities for collaboration between librarians and society leaders.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Head of Collection Development, University of California, San Francisco

Speakers
LA

Lee Ann S. Ferguson

Association Manager, Southern Gerontological Society
FL

Felice Levine

Executive Director, American Educational Research Association


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Shotgun Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Does Size Really Matter in International and Area Studies Collections? Evaluating Collection Development Policies through Usage Assessment (Osman Celik)


How much of collection development for international and area studies should be driven by research interests of faculty and graduate students rather than de facto just-in case approach? The current status of research library stacks certainly calls for a more balanced and sustainable collection development model in areas studies print materials. Engaging in re-evaluation and re-strategizing of research libraries' traditional approach to international print collections is critical with important implications for collections as well as materials budget. Embracing more research-interest driven collection development not only has the potential to significantly improve faculty and graduate students' research across campuses but also the potential to offer for more efficient and strategic distribution of materials budget for years to come.

This usage assessment study employs three different assessments of the UCLA Library's area studies print collections. The first assessment involves usage-based analysis of print monograph collections in major area studies acquired between 2005-2015 fiscal years. The second assessment presents a more detailed usage analysis for the Library's historical collection of the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies using OCLC WorldCat Collection Analysis tool. The last assessment presents an analysis of LC subject headings and classification numbers of Middle East print collection and their level of match with research interests of faculty and graduate students. The outcome of the usage assessment suggests a departure from traditional just in case collection policy to a collection strategy that is more research interest driven and more collaborative collection development across regional and system libraries.

2) A Tempest in a Teapot? Comparing Same-Publisher Sales Before and After DDA Withdrawal (Carol Cramer)

After a major publisher removed its frontlist from the EBL short-term-loan (STL) program, the Wake Forest University library (in a fit of pique) removed the affected books from its Demand-Driven Acquisition pool. What happened next? Did individual librarian selectors start buying more print from this publisher, offsetting any savings? Did the publisher make more sales from WFU before or after the change? In addition to comparing this one publisher before and after the change, I will compare outcomes with another publisher that did not change its participation in STLs during the study period. Along the way, I will share the methodology I used so that this limited study could be broadened in the future to encompass other publishers and other libraries.

3) What Next for Content Platforms in a Fast-Changing World? (Simon Inger)

Today, some obvious choices appear to publishers when they are making decisions about their platform: they can build their own (costly, requires expertise); they can partner with an established platform vendor (pre-built and reduces costs but also control for the publisher); or use a hosting service (the cheaper option but further reduces control and ability to control branding). A platform has theoretically got a predictable life cycle: launch; a few years of stability, during which time technology develops until it starts to look and feel out of date, followed by a period of requirements gathering before a new platform needs to be built and launched.
But change is afoot. Increasing numbers of users access content outside the publishers’ platform, facilitated by Sci-Hub and ResearchGate, alongside a landscape of corporate changes and challenges occurring in the main players in the platform space. The questions we must ask have no easy answers: what next? What should publishers do? How does this affect libraries? Is there an opportunity for new players? Is there an opportunity here for a whole new approach?
Simon Inger founded the world’s first journal platform service provider in 1994, and continues to be an expert on innovations and trends in the platform space. Simon and his colleagues have run large studies every three years since 2005 examining how users discover content. Join him as he maps out potential future scenarios and starts to explore what that might mean to publishers, libraries and researchers.

4) Silo Busting: Adding Value through Resource Sharing Diversification (Courtney McAllister, Brandon Lewter, Renna Redd)

Resource sharing offers opportunities to add value to the patron experience and library collection through systematic integration with acquisitions and collection development operations. With electronic resources becoming increasingly popular, and users relying more heavily on instantaneous access, resource sharing librarians need to strategically adapt to meet the needs of their patrons and institutions. Demand-driven acquisitions, commercial document delivery services, consortia-driven collection development strategies, and institutional workflow analyses are some of the ways resource sharing librarians can deconstruct departmental silos and provide valuable services to their local borrowers and inter-institutional partners. Due to the inherent complexity of resource sharing and collection development, there is no universal strategy that will work for every institution. However, sharing case studies, developing best practices, and discussing future possibilities can help attendees recognize and pursue silo busting opportunities at their own organizations. This paper explores the various strategies and processes being employed at three academic institutions with unique demands and needs. Despite their distinctive properties, these scenarios reflect an underlying commitment to collaboration, innovation, and exemplary service.

5) What do Smithsonian Scientists Want From Their Libraries? (Barbara Ferry)

The Natural & Physical Science (NPS) Libraries at the Smithsonian consist of the libraries serving the National Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, the National Zoological Park and Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Much has been written about the dramatic shift in recent years to electronic resources in university research environments, but there are few recent studies on the use of libraries by museum research staff. As the new head of NPS, I needed to understand the use of scientific sources and library services in this unique environment. Together with the members of the NPS Libraries Advisory Committee, we developed a survey that investigated museum staff’s views and use of the library. Questions included use of library print and digital collections for research, service and training priorities, methods employed to find scholarly journal articles, and data management. More than 260 individuals responded, and the result provided actionable insights into the research and service priorities for the libraries.

Moderators
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro

Speakers
OC

Osman Celik

International Acquisitions Coordinator, UCLA Library
avatar for Carol Cramer

Carol Cramer

Head of Collection Management, Wake Forest University
Carol Joyner Cramer is the Head of Collection Management at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. Before tackling Collection Management, she worked in Reference and as an Electronic Resources Librarian. She has also taught a credit-bearing Information Literacy course... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferry

Barbara Ferry

Head, Natural and Physical Sciences Libraries, Smithsonian Libraries
As Head, Natural & Physical Sciences Libraries at the Smithsonian, I lead a team of 18 staff serving the information needs of scientists and educators. Library staff work at branches located in Washington DC, Edgewater Maryland, Front Royal Virginia, and Panama.
avatar for Simon Inger

Simon Inger

Consultant, Renew Publishing Consultants
Simon Inger has been working in journals since 1987, when he joined B.H.Blackwell, the Oxford-based subscription agent. In late 1994 he founded CatchWord, the world's first journal platform service provider and ran that business until its acquisition by Ingenta in 2001 (now Publishing... Read More →
avatar for Brandon Lewter

Brandon Lewter

Interlibrary Loan Coordinator and Research and Instruction Librarian II, The College of Charleston
Interlibrary loan, reference, and collection development
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Electronic Resources Librarian, Yale University
Electronic Resources Librarian at Yale's Lillian Goldman Law Library. Associate Editor of The Serials Librarian.
avatar for Renna Redd

Renna Redd

Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Clemson University
Renna Tuten Redd has served as the Interlibrary Loan Librarian at Clemson University since 2015. Her duties involve overseeing all resource sharing and document delivery services as well as off-site storage management. Her other current library projects involve participating in the... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

“We Bought a Bench?” Making the Case for Developing an Artists’ Books Collection in the Age of the Digital Library
In the time of all things digital and the need to demonstrate value for dollar, how does an academic library justify investing scarce resources in acquiring and developing a new special collection likely to attract a small number of specialized users? In 2011, York University Libraries acquired a broadly representative collection of approximately 700 artists’ books – works made or conceived by artists that cross the boundaries between book and art - spanning the years 1960-2010 from Granary Books. This session will describe the unique circumstances that led to the acquisition of the collection, ongoing efforts to build and promote the artists’ books collection, as well as accompanying successes and challenges. Topics covered will include: marketing and publicity using traditional and digital strategies; building support within the library and the broader academic community through outreach and fostering relationships; enhancing discoverability through digital exhibitions and descriptive cataloguing; as well as engaging users through information literacy programs and special events programming. Attendees will be invited to share their experiences and strategies for building support for special collections in academic libraries in times of restraint and a focus on digital resources.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Kandiuk

Mary Kandiuk

Visual Arts, Design and Theatre Librarian, York University Libraries


Wednesday November 8, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:30pm

Small, Medium, or Large – Collection Development Solutions to Fit All Libraries
Sponsored by EBSCO
Lunch Provided: Registration Required

While no two libraries are the same, all libraries are tasked with building a collection to meet the diverse needs of faculty and patrons—all with limited staff and a shrinking budget. From small community colleges to academic universities and research institutions, GOBI Library Solutions (formerly YBP Library Services) has been working with academic, medical and specialty libraries world wide for over 40 years, partnering with librarians to develop and manage print and e-book collections that meet their institutions’ goals.

During this session, GOBI Director of Collection Development, Ashley Bailey will share tools, services and best practices that can be scaled to fit every library’s needs and budget. Topics will include:

• Approval Plans (Book and Notification Slips)
• GOBI Spotlight lists and simple notifications tools
• Workflow solutions for firm ordering
• Technical Services, such as EDI Invoicing and book processing
• Enhanced fulfillment results and rush ordering options
• ILS integration partnerships and capabilities

Attendees are encouraged to ask questions to get clarity on how GOBI Library Solutions can address specific goals or challenges in their library.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Fast Bailey

Ashley Fast Bailey

Director, Collection Development and Workflow Solutions, Central US, GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO

Sponsors
avatar for EBSCO Information Services

EBSCO Information Services

EBSCO provides search tools, research content and subscription management services through EBSCO Discovery Service™, hundreds of research databases, e-journals and books.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Upstairs Room, 39 Rue de Jean 39A John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

A Little EBA’ll Do Ya: How EBA is Driving Changes to eBook purchasing
Evidence Based Acquisition (EBA) and other demand driven models continue to grow in popularity. Much of that popularity has to do with the flexibility offered to librarians and administrators. You get to choose the titles. You can advise on the time frame and scheduling. You get to see what patrons are interested in and you get to see what they’re not using. You also end up with an eBook collection which you know will get used. Join us for a session with a group from the UK and the US to offer insight into their own experiences with EBA.

Speakers
avatar for Don Gallagher

Don Gallagher

Senior Library Sales Representative, Cambridge University Press
Don Gallagher has spent over 6 years in library sales at Cambridge University Press with a focus on online resources and specifically Evidence Based Acquisition of EBooks. He currently covers the Southeast US territory and has previously been responsible for the Midwest and Canadian... Read More →
avatar for Apryl Price

Apryl Price

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development, University of North Florida
Apryl is Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. Previously, she was the Electronic Resources Collection Management Librarian at Florida State University Libraries. Professional interests include electronic resource management... Read More →
AS

Anna Sansome

E-Resources Librarian (Development), UCL Library Services
avatar for Nathan Turner

Nathan Turner

Senior Library Sales Executive, Cambridge University Press
Having just celebrated my 10th year at Cambridge University Press, I have experience of selling both Journals and eBooks to markets across Europe and South East Asia and the Middle East. I am currently the senior member of the UK Library Sales team managing accounts across the UK... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Choose Your Own Adventure: A Thrilling Journey of Collaborative Collection Assessment
In 2016, the speakers embarked upon a multi-institutional project to compare print and e-book usage across four Southern California institutions (Claremont Colleges Library, Loyola Marymount University, Pepperdine University, and University of Southern California). The preliminary results of this comparative usage analysis, presented as a poster session at the Charleston Conference, revealed that print books in certain art and architecture classes and subclasses are used over e-books, suggesting “leanings” in format preferences of users.

While this collaborative research project provided provocative insights into art and architecture e-book usage, it also raised important research methods questions related to collaborative analysis using multiple library systems in areas like data extraction and normalization. Usage reports for electronic resources have seen a high degree of standardization following the development of the COUNTER Code of Practice, but no such standard exists for integrated library systems (ILS) reports. Individual librarians who are familiar with the idiosyncrasies of their own ILS reports may be able to overcome system-specific obstacles, but it becomes much more difficult to do so when librarians using different ILSs collaborate on a project combining these reports.

At this lively lunch, four librarians from four different institutions will lead a discussion focusing on the complexities of the research process rather than the outcomes, and will engage attendees with the following questions:

● Under what circumstances would a research project benefit from collaboration between institutions? When does collaboration hinder or complicate the research project?
● What challenges and opportunities have attendees encountered when doing multi-institutional research?
● What challenges do ILSs pose as data collection and extraction systems in collaborative assessment projects?
● What solutions are needed to improve multi-institutional collaboration?

Attendees will leave with a firm grasp of considerations that need to be addressed at the start of a collaborative multi-institutional, multi-ILS assessment project.

Speakers
MD

Madelynn Dickerson

Information Resources Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Jamie Hazlitt

Jamie Hazlitt

Librarian for Collection Development & Evaluation, Loyola Marymount University
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Co-Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
Caroline Muglia is the Co-Associate Dean for Collections & Technical Services at University of Southern California (USC). In this capacity, she also manages collection assessment and resource sharing initiatives at the Libraries. Caroline has been part of DLF-AIG since 2015 and is... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Whitt

Jeremy Whitt

Scholarly Resources Librarian, Pepperdine University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Doing Good and Doing Well: Strategies for Sustaining Open Source Community Publishing Software
With publishing models in flux, several independent initiatives have emerged to support those who seek quicker, less costly means to publish and distribute online content. While many have a clear mission to be open source and free, supporting platforms that can serve thousands of users is serious ongoing work, that requires a great deal of time, expertise, and … money. How are innovative teams today developing ways to draw upon the current enthusiasm for community-based, open platforms, while still generating the resources they need to grow? Put another way: how are innovative projects able to do good, while also doing well?

This session brings together teams from two open source projects to discuss different approaches to addressing user needs and sustainability. The Public Knowledge Project (PKP) has developed Open Journal Systems publishing software used by over 10,000 journals around the world and Open Monograph Press, among other open source solutions. The Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (CoKo) has developed PubSweet, a component-based approach to support journal and book publishing. Both PKP and CoKo are grounded in the mission to make publishing tools freely and easily available to those who need them, and both are pursuing different strategies to grow and sustain their operations.

A moderated Q+A with the project leads will let participants hear about these two approaches, the strengths and current challenges both project face. Then, participants will be drawn into a larger discussion about innovative publishing platforms, the benefits and challenges of working closely with a community of users, and ways to be innovative and open, while still keeping the lights on. This session will be of interest to those engaged in publishing of all types, as well as those leading any sort of open source or other community-based program, where it is critical to create a reliable business model or other system of support.

Speakers
RD

Rebekah Darksmith

Collaborative Knowledge Foundation
avatar for James MacGregor

James MacGregor

Associate Director of Strategic Projects and Services, Public Knowledge Project, SFU Library
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

BlueSky to BluePrint
Nancy works with publishers, librarians and other innovative project leaders to define, test and refine assumptions about their new and existing products and services. She honed her skills in over 20 years of experience working at the nexus of publishing, higher education and technology... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

eBooks Speed Dating: Who’s in the Driver Seat Going Forward?
Probably more than any technology, digital formats have changed the nature of libraries, expanding opportunities for technology advancements and affecting user behaviors. Many lessons have been learned with how eBooks are acquired, licensed by libraries and used worldwide. Libraries are shifting their focus on collections and management, becoming more aware of their community’s mobility, opportunity to read and seek information from many locales, modes and devices. A known and growing commodity, eBooks will only increase their presence and availability.

This session will be a “speed-dating-esque” program led by a librarian, a consortium leader and a publisher’s representative. Each speaker will have 90 seconds to address a topical list developed by the audience at the start of the session. This highly interactive and collaborative discussion will address pros and cons and allow participants the opportunity to shape this unconference approach to future-thinking about eBook trends:

• Speed Dating Round 1: Acquisitions Pros and Cons
o scholarly vs trade content; fiction vs non-fiction
o free vs fee; own vs lease
o pricing comparisons to other formats
o format duplication among library holdings
• Speed Dating Round 2: Platform Pros and Cons
o platform preferences
o concurrent readers
o mobile device optimization
o role of DRM
o on-demand reading
• Second Date: Shifting Collections Strategies
o eBooks as textbooks
o library and college affordability initiatives
o collaborative collection building
o data-driven decision making
o user experience/engagement

Takeaways include highlighting the new and ongoing trends and developments of eBooks. What role is there for libraries and consortia to shape future business models? What initiatives will publishers take? How dependent will both parties be on third-party providers? Come participate in what promises to be a lively and provocative discussion.

Moderators
avatar for Jackie Ricords

Jackie Ricords

Director of E-Resources, IGI Global
Jackie Ricords leads IGI Global’s e-resources and consortia outreach efforts. Prior to joining the STM publisher, she worked in higher education for more than a decade teaching and directing professional development programs for educators. Jackie has expertise in digital resources... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Garskof

Jeremy Garskof

Director of Technical Services, Gettysburg College
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences, Engineering & Public Health Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Mackinder

Lisa Mackinder

Head of Acquisitions and Collections Services, Ohio University
I'm interested in the constantly shifting and changing nature of acquiring materials in all formats. I'm especially interested in e-books, streaming media, the perpetual access conundrum, and finding solutions that allow us to better fulfill our users' needs with diminishing res... Read More →
avatar for Jill Morris

Jill Morris

Associate Director, PALCI - The Pennsylvania Academic Library Consortium, Inc
I advocate for and build collaboration among PALCI's 68 academic member libraries while leading strategic development and management of key consortium programs, including eResources, eBooks, affordable learning, resource sharing and supporting technologies, with particular emphasis... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Everything Old is New Again: Developing Humanities Data Collections
As humanities scholars incorporate digital methods in their research and teaching, librarians are trying to keep up. Humanities librarians are accustomed to purchases of full-text databases (when they can be afforded) or finding data resources on the open web, but may not be considering current print collections as potential sources of data for digital humanities work. This Lively Lunch session will use the presenters’ experiences with humanities data collection development as preliminary provocations for a discussion that will center around evaluation of data sources, the need for policies or procedures for data creation, the importance of user-centered and ethical data collection development, what humanities librarians might learn from social science and science data policies, whether digital humanities projects should be considered collections, and the potential relationship with scholarly publishing policies.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Cain

Jonathan Cain

Head of Data Services, University of Oregon Libraries
Interested in digital scholarship and data, social equity, technology and diaspora communities. Information policy and access. I am interested in opportunities relating to nonprofit organizations and impact on disenfranchised populations, entrepreneurship for public benefit.
avatar for John Russell

John Russell

Associate Director, Ctr for Humanities & Information, Penn State University Libraries


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

From Numbers to Narratives: Putting the Human Face on Metrics

Slides

Session Notes

Scholarly metrics and the systems that deliver them can seem dauntingly complex and shrouded in mystique: but they’re becoming increasingly important to academic librarians and researchers. There are increasing demands to support patrons’ needs in this area, and to help them prepare funding applications and project proposals with a complex set of metrics.

While many commercial products are usually well supported, and often free/open products benefit from a supportive community, this isn’t always the case -- often “getting started” is the biggest hurdle. And when you have the numbers, how can you present them in a compelling and informative way?

Four experts give a user-centered introduction to some of their favorite free, open and commercial platforms. This presentation is particularly suitable to early-stage librarians, and those who are getting increasingly involved in the world of scholarly research metrics.

We plan on focusing on two or three platforms each, and providing our audience with strong takeaways. Platforms will include (but are not limited to…): ImpactStory, Altmetric, Web of Science, Dimensions for Funders, Publons, Kudos, iCite, and Publish-or-Perish.

All speakers will encourage audience contributions for examples of difficult metric-related conversations in which they’ve participated, and time will be left at the end of the session for answers and problem-solving. The four speakers will provide creative suggestions about ways in which the various platforms discussed might have been used effectively within the context of each situation described by the attendees.

Moderators
avatar for Karen Gutzman

Karen Gutzman

Digital Innovations Specialist, Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
I serve as the Digital Innovations Specialist at Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center at Northwestern University where I develop, support, and implement programs that increase awareness about digital scholarship and issues in the digital environment among faculty, researchers... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael  Habib

Michael Habib

Head of Researcher Experience, Web of Science Group
avatar for Aaron Sorensen

Aaron Sorensen

Director, Data Science Insights, Digital Science
avatar for Anne Stone

Anne Stone

Senior Manager, Client Services, TBI Communications
Marketing Strategy | Market Research | Communications Programs/Content Marketing | Interests: Evolution & Disruption, Metrics, Technology, Peer Review, Preprints
avatar for Mike Taylor

Mike Taylor

Head of Metrics Development, Digital Science
Mike is Head of Metrics Development at Digital Science. | Mike is an innovator in scholarly metrics and social impact. Since getting involved in altmetrics in 2011, Mike has written several papers on the subject, conducted much research and is working towards a PhD with Mike Thelwall... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Future Proof: Openness, APIs, and Open Frameworks
*Seating is limited. Register now to secure your place. Lunch will be provided.

Sponsored by Ex Libris


Library discovery is a centerpiece of the efforts of libraries to provide their students, researchers, and instructors with the material they need. But how customized to local needs should it be? What is the perfect fit and how important is it?

In this session we’ll look at how open systems, APIs, and new collaborative models can serve libraries of different sizes and capabilities. While some libraries have the capacity to invest into developing their own interfaces and features, others are far more restricted.

We will discuss examples including the implementation of an open source discovery system on top of a discovery API, and an open customization framework of a commercial discovery system. The session will look into the initial goals and reasons for the individual decisions as well as the challenges the implementers met on the way. We will seek to answer the question whether and how the result satisfied the initial goals, how much work was involved and touch on possible pitfalls but also the opportunities for different sized libraries.

We hope for contributions from the audience to add additional viewpoints from their projects and a discussion about why or why not they embarked on customization projects. What are the lessons learned for the future? 

Speakers
avatar for Andrew French

Andrew French

Director of Sales Operations, Ex Libris
JS

Jon Shaw

Associate University Librarian, University of Pennsylvania
JT

Jason Thomale

Resource Discovery Systems Librarian, University of North Texas Libraries

Sponsors
avatar for Ex Libris

Ex Libris

Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, is a leading global provider of cloud-based solutions for higher education. Offering SaaS solutions for the management and discovery of the full spectrum of library and scholarly materials, as well as mobile campus solutions driving student engagement... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Helping Faculty Embrace Fate: Collaborating to Build and Promote an IR and a Scholarly Communications Program on Campus
This presentation will share the experiences at one university that took a collaborative approach to building an institutional repository and creating a scholarly communication program on campus. All aspects of the collaboration and process will be discussed including successes, failures, roadblocks and campus-wide wins. Presenters will discuss on how the library leveraged their knowledge to solidify a relationship with the Office of Research, the Faculty Center, and other partners around campus to stimulate need and engage in conversations with faculty and administrators. This was all accomplished with no set position dedicated to these needs, and one reference and instruction librarian and a manager in the office of proposal development leading the charge. They were able to use and build relationships with faculty to successfully raise awareness about scholarly communication issues and implement some changes. A direct consequence of engaging with different groups on campus and establishing support on campus has been the growth of the institutional repository from an unknown to a recognized option on campus for making faculty scholarship openly accessible and visible online. Presenters will discuss techniques used to learn about faculty needs, make campus connections, highlight successful partnerships and prepare for the next steps. The presentation will also focus on how cultivating partnerships across campus benefits the library, IR, other departments, and scholarly communication program. Finally there will also be a spotlight on future steps, provided by the newly appointed scholarly communications librarian.

Speakers
SK

Samantha Kennedy

Information Literacy Librarian (formerly Life Sciences Librarian), Rowan University
SR

Shilpa Rele

Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian, Rowan University
SR

Stephen Robishaw

Manager, Office of Proposal Development, Rowan University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Identifying, Funding, and Publishing Open Access Humanities Books
The move to a more sustainable model of publishing open access monographs is gaining momentum around the world, and brings into question some traditional relationships and workflows. In the United States, the new AAU/ARL/AAUP Open Access Monograph Publishing Initiative uses funds from the author’s parent institution to substantially support the publisher’s production costs, allowing for the distribution of an open access copy of the book. In this program, publishing open access humanities monographs requires not only that publishers distribute a book as open access, but also that authors agree to have their books available for free, that institutions financially support authors in publishing open access books, and that libraries select these books for their collections and preserve these digital publications.

While such a reconsideration of the roles and responsibilities of publishers, authors, and their affiliated institutions may seem daunting, a spirit of collaboration and experimentation is helping to make this shift possible. Members of a university press, a university humanities center, and a university library will discuss how they have moved forward with supporting open access monograph publishing, sharing the questions asked (and how they were answered) and the new processes and procedures adopted.

Open-ended questions posed to the audience will invite and encourage discussion, and the presenters will also share tools and processes developed for the support of open access monographs.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Macklin

Lisa Macklin

Director, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
Lisa A. Macklin joined Emory in 2005 and was appointed the first Director, Scholarly Communications Office (formerly the Libraries Intellectual Property Rights Office) in 2007. In this role she works with faculty, students, and staff on the application of copyright law to teaching... Read More →
avatar for Sarah McKee

Sarah McKee

Senior Associate Director for Publishing, Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Emory University
Sarah McKee is the senior associate director for publishing at the Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Emory University. Her focus in this role is the implementation of a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that offers institutional subsidies for publishing... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

It's 2017: Do You Know What Your Approval Plan Is?
What does it mean for a library to have an “approval plan?” The answer used to be simple enough: Approval plans were arrangements between book vendors and academic libraries primarily intended to regularly and automatically identify and deliver pertinent new books via a jointly maintained “profile” of the library’s collecting interests.

While plenty of libraries maintain “approval plans” in 2017, what that means is no longer as clear. Intricate as those profiles could be, they never said much about the likelihood of usage for the books delivered. Today, with usage a key measurement for most libraries in assessing their collections; with the rise of ebooks; the need to repurpose space; a renewed focus on service to users; and sustained, relentless pressure on materials budgets, what libraries call their “approval plan” is often a primarily demand-driven mechanism, rather than a vehicle to generate large numbers of automatic purchases.

Please join three librarians who will discuss the current structure and purposes of what were once, at their libraries, robust, traditional approval plans. What changed for these libraries, and why? What is their thinking about today’s book collections? What do they see for the future?

Steve Bosch is Materials, Budget, Procurement, and Licensing Librarian at the University of Arizona. Trish Chatterley is Collection Strategies Librarian at the University of Alberta. Gracemary Smulewitz is Head of Collection Services and Resources Sharing at Rutgers University. Bob Nardini, who will moderate the panel, is Vice President, Library Services, ProQuest Books.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Bosch

Steve Bosch

Materials Bdg, Proc. and Licensing Librarian, University of Arizona Library
Stephen Bosch has been involved with various aspects of acquisitions, collection development and library administrative services during his 35 year tenure at the University of Arizona. He has held positions as Acquisitions Librarian and Coordinator for Collection Development, Information... Read More →
avatar for Trish Chatterley

Trish Chatterley

Collection Strategies Coordinator, University of Alberta
Trish was the liaison library to the Faculty of Pharmacy for many years before moving into a newly centralized Collection Strategies Unit at the University of Alberta.
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President Library Services, ProQuest
GS

Gracemary Smulewitz

Head of Collection Services and Resources Sharing, Rutgers University Libraries



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Level Up!: Transitioning to a New Library
Congratulations! You’ve survived the interview process, and emerged with a new librarian job. But where do you go from here? What steps should you take to be effective early on in your new position? How do you switch mindsets from a small community college to one of the biggest research universities in the country?

Whether you are transitioning to a new type of institution or a embarking on your first librarian position, you will find something of interest in this talk. This presentation will offer first-hand accounts of transitioning to a major university, and offer strategies for tackling workflow, navigating differences in philosophies, and learning to orient yourself to your new institution.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Duff

Sara Duff

Acquisitions & Collection Assessment Librarian, University of Central Florida
I'm a relatively new hire at UCF, but I previously spent 7 years as a librarian at a community college in the Florida Panhandle. I'm interested in benchmarks (or lack thereof!) for collection assessment, ways to improve collection analysis for program review/new program proposals... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Leveraging Library Consortia: Developing a Shared E-Resources Collection & Improving Vendor E-Resource Accessibility
Academic library consortia have come a long way, from buyer’s club arrangements that began over twenty years ago, to leading solutions for complex issues in libraries today. This session focuses on two complex issues — developing shared e-resource collections and improving the digital accessibility of electronic resources — through case studies from two library consortia. The University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions (USMAI) Library Consortium is improving e-resources management processes to further develop a shared e-resources collection among all of its member libraries. The Big Ten Academic Alliance Libraries formed an E-Resource Accessibility Group to evaluate the accessibility of e-resources for patrons with disabilities, influence vendors, and ultimately advance the field of e-resource accessibility by sharing information. Both consortia have leveraged consortial governance working groups to effect positive change upon various aspects of the e-resources ecosystem, and attendees will learn how to do the same within their own consortia and how to benefit from the work already done in these cases. A major objective of both consortia is to document and share best practices in order to collaboratively advance the fields of e-resources management and accessibility along with library consortia, vendors, and other partners.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Davis

Rick Davis

Copyright & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Towson University
avatar for Lenore England

Lenore England

Asst. Director for Electronic Resources Management, UMUC
Lenore England is Assistant Director for Electronic Resources Management (ERM) at the University of Maryland University College. She has co-chaired several University of System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions (USMAI) ERM task groups and committees and does fundraising for... Read More →
RL

Randall Lowe

Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian, Frostburg State University
Randy Lowe has served in various positions in the Lewis J. Ort Library at Frostburg State University since 1997 and is currently Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian. He has been responsible for the acquisition, licensing, data collection, and assessment of electronic... Read More →
avatar for Robert Van Rennes

Robert Van Rennes

Assistant Director, Library Initiatives, Big Ten Academic Alliance
SR

Stephanie Rosen

Accessibility Specialist, University of Michigan Library
Stephanie Rosen promotes the accessibility of scholarship, publishing, and teaching in her work as Accessibility Specialist at University of Michigan Library. Her background is in teaching and media organizing in the areas of queer, feminist, and disability thought. She has worked... Read More →
avatar for Heidi Schroeder

Heidi Schroeder

Accessibility Coordinator, Michigan State University Libraries
Heidi Schroeder has been a librarian at the Michigan State University Libraries since 2007. She currently serves as the Science Collections Coordinator and Accessibility Coordinator. Heidi's professional interests include: accessibility, collections, ebooks/eTexts, and library instruction/information... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Librarians Leading the Way to Improved Research Reproducibility
Science’s reproducibility crisis is one of the biggest problems facing research today. According to recent estimates, 70-90% of published research cannot be reproduced, forcing scientists to spend countless hours and nearly $28 billion annually - in the U.S. alone - on trial and error. While the entire scientific community has a responsibility to address this crisis, librarians are the best positioned to lead the movement toward more reproducible research. By raising awareness of the reproducibility crisis, teaching patrons the importance of research reproducibility, and developing innovative initiatives to help promote reproducibility, librarians are help to advance research at institutions around the world.

With that in mind, JoVE announced its inaugural Librarian Travel Award this year to celebrate librarians who are leading innovative initiatives focused on raising reproducibility awareness. In this “by librarians, for librarians” presentation, we’ll meet three of our award recipients and study their innovative reproducibility initiatives. Attendees will learn how they developed their initiatives, what results they’ve seen from faculty and patrons since launching them, and what librarians can do at their own institutions to take on leadership roles and raise research reproducibility awareness.

Moderators
avatar for Moshe Pritsker

Moshe Pritsker

CEO, JoVE
Dr. Moshe Pritsker is the CEO and co-founder of Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE). JoVE is the first scientific video journal established in 2006 and headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. JoVE has developed a unique video-based approach to scholarly communication to increase... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lutishoor Salisbury

Lutishoor Salisbury

Distinguished Professor/Librarian, Head, Chemistry and Biochemistry Library, University of Arkansas Libraries
orcid.org/0000-0003-1365-3679
avatar for Franklin Sayre

Franklin Sayre

College of Pharmacy Liaison Librarian, University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries
avatar for Cynthia  Thomes

Cynthia Thomes

Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Maryland University College



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Mission Driven Publishing in the 21st Century
Join us for a roundtable discussion with a group of University Presses to take a closer look at the ways in which missions shape publishing and product strategies and how the missions are being applied in new ways in response to changes in the digital and higher education spaces. This will be an open session with representatives from a variety of university presses. Topics to be covered include: sustainability of Open Access, use of Data and Analytics, OER’s/Publishing Services and the evolving role of print scholarly communication. Presentations will be followed by a moderated QA. Attendees can expect to learn how mission-driven university presses are making plans now to remain valuable to the publishing ecosystem far into the future.

Moderators
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro

Speakers
CB

Chris Bennett

Global Sales Director, Cambridge University Press
avatar for Niko Pfund

Niko Pfund

President and Academic Publisher, Oxford University Press
avatar for John  Sherer

John Sherer

Director, University of North Carolina Press, University of North Carolina
John Sherer was named the seventh director of the University of North Carolina Press in June of 2012. Prior to that, he was the publisher of Basic Books in New York and also held the positions of Publisher of Nation Books, member of the AAP Trade Executive Committee, and adjunct professor... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Windsor

Elizabeth Windsor

Manager, Strategic Initiatives & Business Information, Project MUSE, Johns Hopkins University Press


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Open Libraries: How Can we Fill those Empty Digital Shelves?
Looking for a trusted source of information? That’s a book. In 2017, for many learners if a book isn’t digital, it doesn’t exist. Yet there’s almost a century of knowledge still living only on the printed page, missing from our digital shelves.

The Internet Archive’s Open Libraries project offers a solution that brings four million books online, through purchase or digitization, while honoring the rights of creators and expanding their online reach. Added to our existing 2.5 million ebooks, we can build the online equivalent of a great, modern public library. Working with US libraries and Benetech, operator of the world’s largest digital library for the print disabled, the Internet Archive (IA) will bring millions of free digital books to billions of people.

IA will select and preserve diverse collections and help libraries greatly expand their digital holdings. In 2013, ebooks comprised an average of 17% of U.S. public libraries collections; we can turn 80% of most library collections digital by 2023. We’ll build a financially sustainable infrastructure for at-scale ebook circulation so US libraries that own the hard copy can offer their patrons temporary digital access, just like loaning a book.

In this era of disinformation, ready access to trustworthy sources is critical. Library books are trusted sources for lifelong learning. By bringing them online, we empower journalists, educators and Wikipedia editors to cite “snippets” directly, grounding readers in the vetted, published record.

A century ago, Andrew Carnegie funded a vast network of libraries because he recognized democracy can only exist when citizens have access to good information. Libraries continue to play that vital role, welcoming society to use their resources for individual learning, while respecting readers’ privacy and dignity. Come explore the possibilities with Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle and Wendy Hanamura. They want to hear your ideas and questions about this new digitize-and-lend service.

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Hanamura

Wendy Hanamura

Summit Director & Emcee; Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive
Wendy Hanamura is the master juggler of the Decentralized Web Summit 2018. She led the team that produced the first DWeb Summit in 2016 and the team building this event.As Director of Partnerships at the Internet Archive, one of the world’s largest digital libraries, Hanamura has... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Personalization, Privacy, and the Pressure to Upgrade Authentication – A Conundrum? Or Perhaps a Win-Win?
There are pressures from many angles to change the way library patrons authenticate to online resources. A mix of security concerns and challenges with recognizing off-site users have already driven many universities to make dramatic changes. Vendors and publishers are advocating for the rest to adapt to new realities. This panel will explore the upside and the downside of these changes, including expertise from the technology side, and observations from a library which has met the challenge head on. A discussion of the privacy risks and personalization opportunities related to authentication options will also be included.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ahlberg

Scott Ahlberg

Chief Operations Officer, Reprints Desk, Inc.
Scott has decades of experience in content, document delivery, and startup businesses, starting with Dynamic Information (EbscoDoc) in the 1980s, and later as an executive at Infotrieve. He has served in various roles at Reprints Desk since 2006, providing his expertise in operational... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Leonard

Elizabeth Leonard

Assistant Dean, Seton Hall University
avatar for Joshua  Pyle

Joshua Pyle

VP, Technology and Innovation, Atypon Systems
avatar for Andy Sanford

Andy Sanford

Senior Product Strategist, EBSCO Information Services



Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Pirates or Robin Hoods? Copyright and the Public Good
The wide range of responses to Sci-Hub and other organized piracy operations has exposed, more than ever before, how much disagreement there is in the scholarly-communication world about the proper place of copyright protections. Does copyright law, as currently constituted in the US and the UK, provide a net benefit or cause a net detriment to scholarship and to the world at large? Has it outlived its usefulness?

If we grant that copyright is, on balance, a good thing, then we still need to talk about how broad the provisions of fair use/fair dealing should be, and how stringently copyright law should be enforced. And should we be thinking about copyright very differently in the academic sphere than we do in the arts? This panel session will present differing perspectives on these issues from several experts from around the scholarly-communication ecosystem, followed by discussion with the audience.

Moderators
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, J. Willard Marriott Library/University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Robert Boissy

Robert Boissy

Account Development Director, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →
avatar for William Hannay

William Hannay

Partner, Schiff Hardin LLP
William M. Hannay regularly represents corporations and individuals in civil and criminal matters, involving federal and state antitrust law and other trade regulation laws. He is an Adjunct Professor, teaching courses at IIT/Chicago-Kent law school in antitrust, intellectual property... Read More →
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Special Advisor, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Reading in the Digital Age
With the advent of the internet, Technology has consistently introduced into the educational landscape, new and rapidly-evolving electronic gadgets which have significantly shifted reader-focus from the traditional materials in print to e-texts.
David Durant, in his recent book entitled* Reading in the Digital Age*, posits that, while features like ready-access, ubiquity, convenience and speed are positive advancements , one should consider the reductive consequences of digital reading on students' skills- acquisition, mental and social connectivity and literacy levels in general.
Joyce Dixon-Fyle will interview David Durant and discuss the salient ideas expressed in his book and invite questions from conference participants, who may wish to share their various experiences about their attitude towards on-screen reading and its effects, not only on reading habits, but the wider implications for library practice in particular and for literacy in general.

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Coordinator/Librarian of Collection Development, DePauw University
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both PhD (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting subject... Read More →
avatar for David Durant

David Durant

Federal Documents and Social Sciences Librarian, East Carolina University
My professional interests focus on the importance of preserving and ensuring access to legacy print collections in the digital library environment. This is an especially pressing issue in federal documents, where my institution is a member of the ASERL Collaborative Federal Documents... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Staying Relevant in a Changing Information Landscape: A Global Perspective on Collection Development Best Practices
Navigating the changing book acquisitions landscape can be a challenge. As libraries, we need to stretch budgets further, providing greater access to resources without increasing expenditure. We need to accommodate for the needs of digital natives who expect instant access to content, while still providing in-demand print resources. We need to add to physical and digital collections while taking up less space, so users are better served and the library remains relevant even as the information landscape changes. We need to tie collection development back to measurable outcomes beyond just basic usage statistics.

Are we alone in facing these challenges? Are they unique to North America? How can we learn from the experiences of our colleagues across the globe?

During this panel discussion, librarians from Australia, the U.K. and North America will share how they’re evolving their collection development and acquisition strategies to respond to evolving user demands. They’ll offer insight into the challenges faced at their institutions and the diverse demands of the users who they serve. They’ll also outline how to best work towards common goals of providing researchers and faculty with the breadth and depth of content they seek, working within budgetary limitations, and delivering results that demonstrate return on investment.

Attend this session to gain a panoramic view of budget management, collection building, and purchasing trends from across the globe. This session will be sure to deliver inspirational ideas and best practices that you can incorporate at your own library.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Dunham

Joanne Dunham

Associate Director: Resources and Information, University of Leicester
I am on the University Library's Senior Leadership Team and head the teams responsible for acquiring, describing and making both physical and digital content available and discoverable; collection development and management; the library's digital information systems. I have strategic... Read More →
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP - Market Development, Books, ProQuest


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Survey, Statistics, Narrative: Communicating Library Value to Administrators
Following the success of our 2016 ‘Lively Lunch’ session on communicating the library’s value to faculty and students, we will expand the discussion and present innovative ways libraries are communicating their value to key decision makers such as library administrators and management. Building off the results of T&F library focus groups, surveys, and interviews, this session introduces a thought-provoking and shifted perspective on a library’s worth. We will dive beyond simply marketing new book titles or databases and explore both the quantitative and qualitative forms of usage. Ultimately, we will uncover the varying priorities that librarians and administrators have in determining and conveying value.

Our librarians are eager to share their personal experiences on creatively leveraging their current resources in order to keep their libraries relevant in the face of an everchanging landscape. Highlights of this session will include inviting alumni to library events, providing students with exclusive after-hours library access, involving adjunct faculty in collection management, and using library catalogues to track more than just books.

A shared opinion of the panel is that understanding the value of the entire educational experience is of great importance to potential students as well as funders. Libraries are not only a collection of resources and research support but, in many cases, the heart and face of an institution focused on students, faculty, and their wider goals. Therefore, it’s pertinent to expand discussions on how librarians can turn their data into an impactful story that showcases the true value and relevance of the library and its offerings, positioning it to administration as a vital addition to the educational experience.

Moderators
avatar for Michelle Rivera-Spann

Michelle Rivera-Spann

Sr. Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis Group
Sr. Marketing Manager at Taylor & Francis overseeing the North America library team for the Books business.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Matlak

Jeffrey Matlak

Western Illinois University Libraries
avatar for Mark McCallon

Mark McCallon

Associate Dean for Library Information Services, Abilene Christian University
Library Administration, Open Access Policies, Distance Education
avatar for Alison Scott

Alison Scott

Associate University Librarian for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of California, Riverside
Alison has strategic responsibility for the ways and means by which the University of California, Riverside Library’s collections grow and change. Alison joined the UCR Library in 2014, following services as Head of Collection Development for the George Washington University Libraries... Read More →
LS

Luke Swindler

Collections Management Officer, University of North Carolina
Luke Swindler has been working in collections for over three decades. In his current position he has a leading role in analyzing, planning, and managing library collections generally and spearheading e-books initiatives specifically for the University Library, University of North... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Acceleration of Interdisciplinary Research: How to help researchers integrate into the research ecosystem
Engaging and investment in research to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery, encouraging innovation, enriching education, and stimulating the economy to improve humankind is all part of the research process. Sharing new ideas across the sciences enable researchers to expand their perspective through the engagement with other perspectives. Pre-peer review sharing is becoming more predominant to advancing the interests of researchers, scholars, students, business organizations, librarians, and the public.

Research takes time and publishing concrete ideas in reputable journals can be a long road.
What if research librarians could assist their young scholars with getting their ideas noticed early?

What if scholars posted their working papers and ideas in a community where sharing knowledge is valued and collaboration refined research to promote better research faster?

Primary Speaker Gregg Gordon, managing director of SSRN and the thought leader behind Tomorrow’s Research Today. He will discuss edge cases about accelerating interdisciplinary research in today’s digital world.

Gregg is the managing director of SSRN focused on the high quality, rapid, electronic dissemination of scholarly research at the lowest possible cost - Tomorrow's Research Today.

In May 2016, SSRN joined Elsevier, a world-leading provider of information solutions promoting the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, and deliver better care. Together, we can further enhance early discoveries of ideas in an open-access environment of sharing and collaboration.

Scholarly Speaker J.J. Prescott, Professor of Law, Professor of Economics (courtesy) Codirector, Empirical Legal Studies Center, Codirector, Program in Law and Economics University of Michigan
As technology becomes ever more integral to the research process, well-designed platform software has the potential to bring together researchers and scholarship from different disciplines, and ultimately, if done right, transform the production of scholarship into something fine-tuned and well-oiled, accelerating research generally. One age-old difficulty of university- and disciplined-based scholarship is that different fields develop distinct lexicons, which becomes path-dependent, exacerbated by the tendency of scholars to use non-descriptive terms to label ideas and methods (e.g., authors’ names). As a result, even the most knowledgeable scholar in a particular field may have trouble discerning which issues have been addressed and problems solved in other fields. Consequently, wheels are being constantly re-invented and collaboration opportunities are routinely missed, even by scholars working in buildings right next to each other. Smart tools, however, have the capacity to break down these walls. One exciting possibility is the use of machine learning to begin to automate the translation process and build field-specific “views” of other fields. Leveraging existing interdisciplinary scholarship or the substance of research itself, software can identify links between concepts in different fields and then use these links to “translate” advances in other fields into a scholar’s “native” language. Platform technology and big data methods also render the possibility of mapping disciplines, including their overlapping areas, a realistic possibility. Tools that allow scholars to know quickly when another field has dealt with the same or similar problem – or to know quickly that it hasn’t – may well be the combustion engine of research in the 21st century.

Speakers
avatar for Gregg Gordon

Gregg Gordon

Managing Director, SSRN
avatar for J.J. Prescott

J.J. Prescott

University of Michigan


Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Altmetrics for Everyone: How to get Open, Easy, Free Metrics of Online Impact
This presentation explores an exciting development in altmetrics: Open, Free, Easy Altmetrics for Everyone! Building on the beta release of Crossref Event Data, two non-profit, mission-driven organizations, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and Impactstory, are partnering to build an open website and API that is easy to use by publishers, librarians and researchers.

While the Crossref Event Data service brings an open source of altmetrics data, its native data format cannot be used without additional processing to calculate, aggregate, and represent the altmetrics information. The new website and API being developed by ImpactStory in partnership with PKP, to be launched in the fall of 2017, will provide metrics, graphs, and maps in ways that are directly beneficial for individuals, publishers, and institutions.

Come hear from the developer, a publisher adopter, and a librarian how this initiative will support the adoption of open source software that enables a more open and diverse environment of scholarly activities, increasing adoption and ensuring the sustainability of alternative metrics tools and services based on open technologies.

Discussion will focus on practical ways publishers and librarians can use this service to improve stakeholder experiences, as well as the pros and cons of this new service specifically. We’ll also compare the advantages and disadvantages of this and other existing altmetrics solutions, along with brief coverage of the uses and pitfalls of altmetrics in general.

Speakers
avatar for James MacGregor

James MacGregor

Associate Director of Strategic Projects and Services, Public Knowledge Project, SFU Library
HP

Heather Piwowar

cofounder, Impactstory
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

cofounder, Impactstory
avatar for Robin Sinn

Robin Sinn

Scholarly Communications Specialist, Sheridan Libraries, Johns Hopkins University
I keep information about open access, metrics, copyright, IR, and other scholarly communications issues moving around the JHU Libraries by working with the folks in our Scholarly Communications Group. I managed our open access promotion fund for three years (until we closed it), blog... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Amazon.com vs. EBSCO’s GOBI Library Solutions: Collecting LGBTQ & Title IX Titles to Evaluate Book Vendors
This panel will highlight the experiences of a college’s efforts to build a diverse LGBTQ and Title IX collection while comparing the benefits and challenges to ordering from Amazon.com versus EBSCO’s GOBI Library Solutions. At the time this study was conducted, the library provided access to (owned and leased) a total of 3,657 non-unique print and eBook titles about LGBTQ and Title IX topics when searching subject headings in the library’s discovery service (EBSCO Discovery Service with index); the titles had crossover between the subject matters. With a population of mainly first-generation students with proven limited access to tablets and other e-Readers, combined with a miniscule print book budget, the Director of the Library set out to purchase additional new and used print titles. This paper analyzed which wholesale book vendor— Amazon.com with Prime or EBSCO’s GOBI Library Solutions — effectively streamlined workflow acquisition processing and was more cost effective. The title list examined for this study consisted of 75 new and used LGBTQ and Title IX print titles. Furthermore, this panel will address the need to regularly add new diverse subject matter materials to create a supportive environment for assisting students, staff, and faculty who seek information about this topic. Advantages and challenges of purchasing from both vendors as well as building a diverse LGBTQ collection will be discussed. Results from this study revealed a final cost difference between Amazon (without Prime Shipping) and GOBI Library Solutions of 2.80% and a final cost difference between Amazon (with Prime Shipping) and GOBI Library Solutions of 11.01%. Audience participation and sharing of similar acquisition experiences is strongly encouraged.

Speakers
avatar for Trevor A. Dawes

Trevor A. Dawes

Vice Provost for Libraries and Museums and May Morris University Librarian, University of Delaware
I am an experienced librarian and educator.
avatar for Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Director, Goldey-Beacom College
Russell Michalak, MLIS, joined Goldey-Beacom College (GBC) in 2010. As Director of Library & Learning Center/Assistant Professor, he oversees all operations of the library including the annual budget. In addition, he supervises and hires librarians, tutors, paraprofessionals, as well... Read More →
avatar for Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Director (Office of Institutional Research & Training), Assistant Professor, Goldey-Beacom College
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. is the Director of Institutional Research and Training for Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Demystifying the Buzz Words: Linked Data, Artificial Intelligence - What Does This Mean for my Library?
This session seeks to introduce the audience to innovative new library workflow initiatives surrounding Linked Data and Artificial Intelligence, in particular to illustrate real-life examples of how these emerging technologies are relevant to libraries, publishers and users. Our speakers are experts representing a diverse range of experiences. Phil Schreur, AUL for Technical and Access Services at Stanford University, leads the Linked Data initiative at Stanford University. Erik Mitchell, AUL for Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services and Associate CIO at University of California Berkeley Libraries, is a researcher and author on the role of information design, technology, and literacy in empowering and sharing information communities. Ruth Pickering is co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Yewno Inc., which creates AI-driven knowledge discovery technology platforms.

Speakers
EM

Erik Mitchell

Associate University Librarian, Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services, UC Berkeley
I'm a librarian, administrator and researcher who cares about how libraries impact our daily lives. I have a passion for structured data and can be easily drawn into a conversation about why we focus so much library energy on metadata and information systems.
avatar for Ruth Pickering

Ruth Pickering

Co-founder & Chief Strategy Officer, Yewno, Inc
Ruth has worked for both blue-chip corporations and startups and has extensive experience across product development, program management and strategy. With experience as a managing director of large organizations, Pickering has managed both strategic planning and execution of multiple... Read More →
PS

Philip Schreur

Associate University Librarian for Technical and Access Services, Stanford University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Discovery’s Foundation: Effectively Leveraging a Century’s Worth of Metadata
Available metadata can determine the opportunities for integrating collections and creating functionality in discovery tools. But when is developing the best user experience for a discovery interface a matter of writing the most effective code? Designing the most intuitive user interface? Or, creating and enhancing metadata to meet discovery needs?

Given variations in metadata we aggregate, does complete integration create the best user experience, when do silos really cause discovery problems, and what are metadata practices that will allow for robust functionality across collections within a single discovery environment? This presentation explores how metadata practices affect the possible functionality of discovery layers, and the discoverability of the titles they index. It looks at common problems libraries face communicating with users about available resources, and the usability trouble that creates.

Developing an open source discovery layer gives a lot of flexibility, which can be both empowering and overwhelming. This presentation primarily draws on the experience of developing a Blacklight discovery layer while also retaining a vendor provided discovery layer at Brown University Library. It also explores general themes that are apparent in the implementation of discovery interfaces at various colleges and universities.

Jeanette Norris is a metadata librarian and chair of the Discovery Advisory Committee at Brown University Library. She is working on the discovery development team and is an expert on the effect that metadata policies and practices have on the quality of the user experience and the functionality we create. Part of this analysis will also include decisions BUL made, such as opting not to integrate our catalog into our vended central article index, and how we have approached integration with our digital collections.

Speakers
JN

Jeanette Norris

Metadata Management Librarian, Brown University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Don’t Stop the Presses! Study of Short-Term Return on Investment on Print Books Purchased under Different Acquisition Modes
Slides

How long are we willing to wait for a book to demonstrate value? How many circulations are enough?

Today, there is more pressure to show return on investment (ROI) than there used to be thirty, twenty, or even ten years ago. In the era of increasingly electronic, demand-driven, and evidence-based collection development, the once reigning print book is ceding its central place within library collections.

While faculty and students are showing renewed interest in print materials, flat or declining library budgets, along with inevitable increases in electronic subscription rates, put downward pressure on print monograph funding. Libraries continue to develop their print book collections, however we need to develop a data-driven approach to guide selection and acquisition of the most relevant print books.
The Claremont Colleges Library conducted a short-term ROI study comparing recent print books acquired under three different acquisition modes: approval autoship, demand-driven purchase, and librarian selection. We looked at short-term ROI averages for each acquisition mode, including how long it takes for a book to circulate for the first time and how many times books circulate within the first year after acquisition. We also reviewed the number of books, overall expenditure per acquisition mode, and disciplinary distribution of print book acquisitions from a historical perspective, exploring how the proportions of expenditure between print approval and firm ordering changed at the advent of demand-driven purchasing and the proliferation of e-books.
The audience will learn how this study’s findings are informing our budgeting strategies and future collection development.

Speakers
CL

Candace Lebel

Information Systems Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Maria Savova

Maria Savova

Director of Information Resources and Systems, Claremont Colleges Library
Maria oversees the Library's Materials budget and has broad responsibilities for leading the library’s strategy in funding, selecting, and managing information resources for the Claremont Colleges’ user community. She is also responsible for developing innovative, user-centered... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Driving Discoverability and Accessibility with Metadata and Ebooks
The rapid increase in the number of digital books, back list and front list, combined with the release of accessible epub3 specifications early in 2017 brings a strong convergence between web discovery tools and traditional approaches for using library metadata for search, discovery and access. We will share the latest on accessible epub – what it is, what it means and how libraries can use it. We will share examples from the Digital Public Library of America and Benetech. We will discuss key factors for driving content discovery and promoting accessibility using examples from the Humanities Open Book Project. We will wrap-up with a look ahead at the W3C’s progress toward epub4 and provide a guide for librarians interested in following advances in standards. Our presentation will include enough technical detail to satisfy a wide audience range without overwhelming them. For audience members interested in deeper dive, we will encourage follow-on conversations post-session.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, J. Willard Marriott Library/University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as... Read More →
SM

Sue-Ann Ma

Senior Product Manager, Benetech Labs
avatar for Dean Smith

Dean Smith

Director, Cornell University Press
Dean Smith is Director of Cornell University Press -- the first university press in the US -- and oversees a program that publishes 130 new books a year and features 3,000 titles in print. His newest author is John Cleese. His career in publishing spans 30 years and includes experience... Read More →
GS

Greg Suprock

Head of Solutions Architecture, Apex CoVantage



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

EBA in Practice: Facilitating Evidence-Driven E-Book Programs in both Consortium and Individual Library Settings
The Orbis Cascade Alliance piloted an Evidenced Based Acquisition Approach with Wiley in 2016-2017. Upon completion of the pilot, the Alliance’s E-Book Working Group made content selection decisions to benefit almost 40 distinct institutions using a 3-pronged approach focusing on individual institution usage, broadly used, and overall highly used titles. The Alliance’s E-Book strategies for 2017-18 include: setting up a second EBA pilot, while continuing the first; integrating with GOBI Library Solutions to benefit Alliance members; and other plans for cooperative e-book management for the group of member institutions. All the while, keeping in mind goals for a broad range of content, stable costs, and making titles accessible both to patrons as well as from a technical services perspective.

The University of South Florida (USF) Library maintains multiple DDA and EBA ebook programs as the basis for its collection management strategy in an effort to provide the scope of monographic material required by a large metropolitan research university in the most cost effective manner. In 2010, librarians at USF replaced traditional approval plans with an extensive patron-driven acquisitions program. Leveraging usage data from the DDA program with EBL (now ProQuest Ebook Central) several evidence-based acquisition programs were established with providers such as Wiley, Project Muse, Elsevier, Oxford University Press, Taylor & Francis, and Cambridge University Press, as well as consortial EBAs through Coutts and Taylor & Francis. The selection process begins with profiling the DDA and is developed combining factors that satisfy our programmatic requirements. Successful implementation at this scale requires collaborative effort from a community of librarians and staff with diverse skill sets.

These two viewpoints provide a comprehensive perspective of managing multiple ebook acquisition models in both consortium and individual institutions.

Speakers
JA

John Abresch

Collections Librarian, University of South Florida Library
John Abresch is an Acquisitions/Collections Librarian in the Academic Resources Department at University of South Florida Library. John’s professional responsibilities are with acquisitions functions as well as engaging in collection planning activities. His research interests... Read More →
avatar for Andy Langhurst Eickholt

Andy Langhurst Eickholt

Collection Management Librarian, Eastern Washington University Libraries
LP

Laura Pascual

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of South Florida
Laura Pascual is the Electronic Resources Librarian for the University of South Florida Libraries.  As a part of the library’s Textbook Affordability Project, she manages the E-books for the Classroom program.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

From Advocacy to Action: How Libraries Are Advancing their Role with Regard to Open Educational Resources
In this session, presenters will share insights from a recent research project undertaken to better understand the evolving role of libraries in supporting affordable and open educational resources. Highlights from a 2017 survey of 230 academic librarians will be shared along with the main themes that emerged from the data. A panel discussion will follow in which three academic librarians working with open and/or alternative educational resources will share their experiences. The moderated question set will relate to how these themes are serving as a catalyst for moving the library forward from a place of advocacy to one of action. Panelists will share the ways in which they leverage library resources and budget to support affordability initiatives, how they are creating effective learning experiences by design, and how they are developing copyright and licensing expertise.

Attendees will come away from this session with greater perspective on the actions their peers think are most important to undertake now and in the future with regard to OERs, how librarians rate their current performance on those objectives, and which activities are deemed to be the most challenging. From the panelist discussion, attendees will hear specific examples of how those trends are playing out on certain campuses, identify the largest obstacles that must be overcome, and gain insight into what the future holds for libraries working with alternative or open course materials.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Denzer

Kelly Denzer

Electronic Resources Librarian, Davidson College
Kelly is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Davidson College, Davidson, NC. While working on her MLIS, she worked as a Research Assistant for the Mellon funded project, The Charlotte Initiative: Principles for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks for Academic Libraries, at J. Murrey... Read More →
avatar for Teri Gallaway

Teri Gallaway

Associate Commissioner, Louisiana Library Network
NR

Nicole Rakozy

Program Manager, Gale, a Cengage company
avatar for Cynthia  Thomes

Cynthia Thomes

Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Maryland University College


Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

From Descriptive Analysis to Prescriptive Analytics: Visualization and Validation in Shared Print
The Eastern Academic Scholars’ Trust (EAST) is the largest regional shared print program with 6 million monograph titles already committed for long-term retention. Over the last year, EAST has expanded its goal of protecting the scholarly record by focusing on retention of back files of serials and journals titles.

This session will focus on the important role that data analysis and analytics have played in EAST’s retention decisions. As part of the initial monograph retention program, EAST undertook a large-scale sample validation program and amassed an extensive data set. Attendees will learn the details of this study and be introduced to the statistical analysis that determined correlation between various factors and the likelihood that specific items are more likely to be missing or in poor condition.

On the serials and journals side, we will explore how EAST worked with the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) and their recently introduced collection comparison service to narrow down retention commitments from the 112,000 unique titles held. We will show examples of the data we found useful as well as visual representations of the data, which we experimented with using Tableau.

Carried out without grant funding, the serials and journals analysis has required reaching consensus on a retention policy from a diverse range of libraries across the northeast. The group considered whether EAST should focus on protecting rare titles or make commitments to more widely held titles, thereby providing libraries with much needed withdrawal opportunities.

For both monograph and serials retention, EAST has relied on extensive analysis of the collective collection. We have worked with statistical and visualization tools to understand the collection from a descriptive perspective. Using both prescriptive and prospective analytics, EAST has furthered the mission of protecting the print scholarly record for research, scholarship and teaching.

Speakers
MM

Mei Mendez

Project Manager, Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust
avatar for Susan Stearns

Susan Stearns

Executive Director, Boston Library Consortium & Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust
Susan Stearns is the Executive Director of the Boston Library Consortium (BLC) and Project Director for the Eastern Academic Scholars’ Trust (EAST) shared print initiative. She coordinates the activities of the EAST Project Team, works closely with the Executive Committee and is... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

From the CSU Files: Centralizing Collection Management at a Large Research Library
This presentation will describe the centralization of collection management at University of Alberta Libraries and provide advice to other organizations considering similar changes. A centralized Collection Strategies Unit (CSU) was formed in April 2016 under direction of the Associate University Librarian for Collections. Five librarians work with previously established serials and monograph acquisitions teams on all matters related to collections. CSU also shares workspace with the Bibliographic Services Unit, responsible for cataloging and processing. While four Collection Strategies Librarians working as a team share the same overall responsibilities and job descriptions, each librarian has functional and subject area responsibilities. Two librarians manage licensing and electronic resources, one oversees monographic acquisitions including ebook packages and approval plans, while another coordinates projects related to physical collections and web archiving. A Collection Strategies Coordinator oversees the functioning of the entire unit. New workflows have been established to centralize collections and acquisitions work of the CSU. A priority is to assess library collections more routinely and systematically than was previously done, ensuring effective allocation of the library system's $25 million budget. A new budget model was introduced in the 2017/2018 Fiscal Year, reducing fund codes for materials down to two, one for continuing resources and one for firm orders. To assist subject librarians in adjusting to changes regarding their former collections duties, various modes of communication have been instituted: weekly blog, regular meetings with branch library staff, and informational meetings with all subject librarians. Subject librarians are regularly consulted regarding potential new products, trials, and possible cancellations. The transition to the new CSU has been successful and we continue to work together to improve our workflows and communications.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Carpan

Carolyn Carpan

Collection Strategies Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries
avatar for Trish Chatterley

Trish Chatterley

Collection Strategies Coordinator, University of Alberta
Trish was the liaison library to the Faculty of Pharmacy for many years before moving into a newly centralized Collection Strategies Unit at the University of Alberta.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

If We Had A Prologue
What would you do differently during a library system migration? Two librarians who had never participated in a system migration guided their understaffed libraries from Innovative Interface's Sierra to Ex Libris's Alma and Primo as part of the 23-campus California State University consortium's system migration. Jodi Shepherd from Chico State University and Laura Krier from Sonoma State University will present on their experiences as project managers. They'll talk about how they planned and prioritized work in small teams, what went right, and what changes they'd make if they had to do it again. The challenges and experiences of these project managers will provide a prologue for other librarians facing a system migration, providing confidence to those who might be out of their comfort zone, doing something new, and lacking a large team of staff to help. 

Speakers
avatar for Laura Krier

Laura Krier

Systems and Metadata Librarian, Sonoma State University
I am the Systems and Metadata Librarian at Sonoma State University, liaison to the School of Arts and Humanities, and faculty department chair for the library. I am interested in talking about optimizing workflows in Alma and learning different configuration options. I'm also always... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Shepherd

Jodi Shepherd

Head of Collections, California State University, Chico
Jodi Shepherd is the Head of Acquisitions, Collection Development, and Evaluation Unit at the Meriam Library. She has been at Chico State since 2008 where she has held positions in public services and technical services. She has a B.A. in Political Science from Oregon State University... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Impact Analytics: Empowering the Library to Evaluate Meaningful Use of E-Resources
Data is easy, but insight is hard. With COUNTER, Google Analytics, and user engagement reports, we have more data than ever on how e-resources are used. Data-driven acquisition models rely on usage statistics to measure whether a resource was used, enabling cost-per-use calculations. Industry standards including COUNTER make it easier to compare similar use between e-resources. Engagement reports demonstrate not only if a resource was used, but how it was used. We can determine if content was annotated, shared, or embedded in an LMS. We can see what subjects or titles are viewed the most.

While the first step is making this data available, the next step is determining how these analytics can empower the library to evaluate true educational and research impact of services. Was the video viewed for entertainment or learning? Was it shown in a lecture or played once on a mobile device? Do views referred by the library generate a deeper engagement? How valuable is a video if only 5% is viewed? Above all, which of these questions should we be asking and how do the answers impact libraries future investment in staffing, services, and support for curated usability based collections.

We need experiments in how reports should be interpreted against institutional learning and research outcomes. In this session Boaz Nadav-Manes (Brown University), Jesse Koennecke (Cornell University), Helen Adey (Nottingham Trent University), and Andrea Eastman-Mullins (Alexander Street) will share:
• Approaches at 3 libraries that go beyond simple cost-per-use evaluation to support effective decision making.
• Recommendations on useful impact metrics and how to connect results to institutional goals.
• What aggregate publisher usage data reveals about how video is used in higher education.
• How we can come together collectively to envision how all libraries can effectively evaluate impact.

Speakers
HA

Helen Adey

Resource Acquisition & Supply Team Manager, Nottingham Trent University
avatar for Andrea Eastman-Mullins

Andrea Eastman-Mullins

VP Product Management, ProQuest / Alexander Street
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions and E-Resource Licensing Services, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management, Brown University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is the Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management at Brown University Library. In this role, he oversees the allocation and expenditure of the Libraries' collections budget, and the ongoing management of services and staff that advance... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Is it Really Publishing? The Why and How of Library Publishing Initiatives
In recent years, dozens of libraries around the world have launched publishing programs. What factors explain this phenomenon and can libraries really succeed in this competitive, evolving, and highly skilled industry? Can what libraries do even be called "publishing"? This session will address these questions and more, exploring both the why and how of library publishing. Librarians will be introduced to the landscape of library publishing initiatives and will learn the steps involved in launching one at their institution, from assessing campus needs to advocating for resources. Publishers will have a chance to better understand this growing trend and the opportunities it presents for collaboration and innovation. All participants will come away with a better understanding of how libraries are contributing to the transformation of scholarly publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Lippincott

Sarah Lippincott

Assessment and Planning Librarian, UMass Amherst
I'm an information professional with a passion for digital scholarship. I served as the inaugural Program Director for the Library Publishing Coalition, where I built a community of over 60 libraries around the world. I have published and presented widely on library publishing and... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Keeping Pace with Research Patron Practices: A Discussion on Faculty and Student Needs in 2017
Academic librarians today are more engaged than ever in the research missions of their institutions and while the hats they wear continue to increase, so too does their support of scholarly research. From students who enter the university with varied levels of research preparation to post-graduate researchers and faculty who have to incorporate new standards and practices into their workflow, librarians are often expected to keep pace – whether by speeding up or slowing down – to meet the needs of their patrons. In this session, two librarians who are adept at these efforts will share some expertise on researcher support for the faculty member and the student.

Anne Langley, Associate Dean for Research, Collections, and Scholarly Communications at Penn State University, will discuss how the changing world of scholarship has led to changing processes in scholarly research for faculty. She will address:
• An introduction into the changing research landscape such as new requirements from funding, changing priorities for research metrics, and new ways of aggregating information
• The new roles for librarians that result from these changes
• Tips for success for providing support at the different stages of the research process

Rosalind Tedford, Director for Research and Instruction at Wake Forest University, will share best practices for reaching students where they are – from recent high school graduates who have never written a true research paper before to those from institutions where extensive attention was given to the research process. She will share:
• How to make successful presentations to classes of students when invited by instructors
• How to partner with teaching faculty in order to best fulfill the research needs of their students
• How to teach students to be critical consumers of information while steering them away from unreliable news and ultimately, a skepticism toward information that doesn’t mesh with their personal beliefs

Speakers
AL

Anne Langley

Associate Dean for Research, Collections, and Scholarly Communications, Penn State University
avatar for Rosalind Tedford

Rosalind Tedford

Director for Research and Instruction, Wake Forest University
Information Literacy; Instruction; Liaison Work



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Shotgun Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Assessing large ebook collections: Is the past a roadmap for developing collections of the future? (Stacy Baggett)


In the current climate of dwindling book budgets, practices of collection building for many of us now depend on purchasing ebook collections rather than individual print titles. Because these ebook collections are prepackaged, libraries have less control over individual titles and the quality of those titles. During the summer of 2017, the electronic resources librarian at Shenandoah University conducted an assessment of the library’s major ebook collections. The editors of Choice publish an annual list of best books, typically used as a standard in book collection practices. In this assessment project, the library’s ebook holdings in ProQuest’s Ebook Central (formerly ebrary) and EBSCO’s eBook Academic Collection were compared to Choice Outstanding Academic Titles Lists for five years, from 2012 – 2016. Currently, the library holds approximately 300,000 titles in its ProQuest and EBSCO collections. Using the Choice lists as a standard for comparison, the presenter will help participants adapt these methods in order to evaluate the suitability of their own ebook collections. Participants will learn strategies for building high quality ebook collections appropriate for their institutions and curricula. Questions about determining book title quality and matching titles with Choice and ebook collections will be explored. Participants will learn strategies for evaluating their own ebook collections and techniques for implementing changes in order to build more relevant ebook collections. Implications for collection development policies will be considered. Participants will be invited to respond to survey questions that explore best practices for ebook assessment and collection building.

2) Unfinished Books: Could Libraries Embrace the Plasticity of Ebooks (Ravit David)

Books like "Don Juan" by Lord Byron or "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" by Charles Dickens enjoy huge readership even though they are unfinished works whose authors either died before they finished writing them or never really intended to publish them. But, unfortunately, the same argument cannot be made for Ebooks readership especially in cases where Ebooks are received by academic libraries or loaded onto various platforms before their making was completed.

Focusing on cases where Ebooks were changed, updated or removed long after the Ebooks titles were cataloged by libraries and made available to patrons –this paper considers how Ebooks’ ever evolving production changes libraries’ traditional workflows and forces us to be creative, "just in time" thinkers when it comes to Ebooks.
As if Byron and Dickens are still working to finish their great works although we already shelved it, this paper also offers librarians some strategies to deal with unfinished Ebooks and their plasticity without compromising readership in their institutions.

3) E-Book Longevity--Dynamics of E-Books Over Time (Christopher Palazzolo)

A substantial number of bibliometric studies have focused upon analyzing the circulation dynamics of print titles in academic library collections. A significant focus of this data collection and investigation is on the use of new, or approval titles or firm orders over certain time increments, as a means to assess the efficacy of such approval plans and/or of librarian anticipatory selection. A few studies have begun to approach such collection assessment on e-books to determine if their circulation (use) parallels print book circulation and use over time. For example, do e-titles chosen by selectors have a higher use than those in broad subject or publisher packages? Does the proportion of use of a package over time mirror that of a “package” of approval titles over the same amount of time? Of course, there are significant differences in e-book vs. print use (and what one can measure), so any conclusions will remain very tentative. This presentation will focus on several e-book packages, as well as e-book firm ordering, at Emory to see if any discernable circulation dynamics can be found, and what, if any, similarities there are with print circulation studies.

4) Playing the Field: Life After We Broke Up with the STL (Doug Way)

In 2015 the University of Wisconsin-Madison eliminated a successful short-term loan-based ebook acquisition program and replaced it with a multi-layered access and ownership strategy that relies heavily on subscriptions, different evidence-based and demand-driven acquisition models, and purchased publisher collections. This session will describe the library’s ebook strategy and its impact on users and library staff since it was implemented. It will also compare and explore the effectiveness of these different acquisition models and how the library’s ebook acquisition program continues to evolve within a larger collections-as-a-service framework.

5) Beyond Cost Per Use: Exploring Multivariable E-Resource Assessment (Courtney McAllister)

The converging pressures of dwindling budgets, increasing subscription costs, and shifting user expectations has intensified the impact of collection management decision making. Assessing e-resource subscriptions is an integral part of any library’s collection management process, though it is especially important in academic environments. While CPU can be a straightforward and informative measure to consider, that lone data point might not reveal the true value of an e-resource. This presentation outlines a multifaceted assessment strategy that recognizes the various merits of an e-resource, such as supporting accreditation, providing access to material not easily obtained through resource sharing channels, discoverability and platform ease of use, and the quality of vendor support or responsiveness. Incorporating CPU data into a more holistic rubric might require additional time and energy, but the resulting decisions to renew or discontinue subscriptions will be more nuanced and indicative of an underlying commitment to curating distinctive and accessible e-resources. Attendees will be encouraged to critique and/or expand upon the multivariable assessment criteria, to further the wider discussion of how libraries are defining and analyzing the value of their collections.

Moderators
avatar for Meg White

Meg White

Executive Director of Technology Services, Rittenhouse
Meg White is a twenty-year veteran of the health sciences publishing industry. Her background includes various sales, marketing, and product development positions at Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Mosby, Williams & Wilkins, and Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins... Read More →

Speakers
SB

Stacy Baggett

Electronic Resources Librarian, Shenandoah University
Stacy Baggett, Electronic Resources Librarian at Shenandoah University in Winchester, VA, manages all aspects of the e-resources life cycle. Her previous experience includes cataloging, strategic planning, and workflow analysis. Stacy holds an M.L.S from North Carolina Central University... Read More →
avatar for Ravit H. David

Ravit H. David

Ebook Coordinator and Metadata Librarian, Scholars Portal, OCUL University of Toronto Library
Ebooks? Metadata? I coordinate the Ebook service for Ontario Council of University Libraries. Scholars Portal Ebook platform has over 600,000 commercial and non-commercial titles. I hold MLS in Library and Information Studies and PhD in English Literature. My recent case study appears... Read More →
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Electronic Resources Librarian, Yale University
Electronic Resources Librarian at Yale's Lillian Goldman Law Library. Associate Editor of The Serials Librarian.
CP

Christopher Palazzolo

Head of Collections (Woodruff Library), Emory University
avatar for Doug Way

Doug Way

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Research Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doug Way is the associate university librarian for collections and research services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he provides leadership for the library's collection development and management, resource sharing, and scholarly communications programs. Doug has written... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Show, Don’t Tell: Embedding Library Services into the Campus Website and Community
The campus’s website is its most public face to students, faculty, and funders. Its goal is to tell them what sets the university apart. Meanwhile, many libraries are sitting on a goldmine of the institution’s most unique offerings, from student research conferences to faculty art. Increasingly, libraries are bringing the university’s scholarship and creative work directly to the campus website and the audiences it serves. They show interested visitors what makes the campus unique by embedding content from their scholarly repositories, faculty galleries of mentors and researchers, and live readership visualizations into the university’s primary marketing vehicle.

In this presentation, Jean-Gabriel Bankier, President and CEO of bepress, will provide a brief overview of this trend, sharing data and examples from a community of some 500 institutions. Next, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Scholarly Communications Librarian and Professor at Illinois Wesleyan University, will offer a case study from the Ames Library. She will describe how embedding content lets prospective students and faculty explore Illinois Wesleyan's intellectual and cultural life on a deeper level, which creates new opportunities for the university. In fact, multiple faculty members note that the strong student work they saw on Digital Commons @ IWU—prominently listed on the main campus site—played a role in their decision to apply for positions at Illinois Wesleyan.

The session will be interactive and have time for questions and discussion at the end. Attendees will come away with ideas of how to integrate library offerings into the campus website and culture in ways that strengthen the library’s role.

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Jean-Gabriel Bankier

Managing Director, bepress
IR success metrics and bench marking | Faculty profiles | Author readership dashboards
avatar for Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Scholarly Communications Librarian and Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Storage Warriors: Survivors of the “Big Move”
As library collections continue to grow, stacks become overcrowded and library space is repurposed for patrons, librarians must transform into: Storage Warriors. Panelists will discuss the planning, organization, preparation and execution of three different library storage projects – two remote and one on campus, including lessons learned, key takeaways and post-move plans.

Sheli McHugh and Narda Tafuri will talk about the move of over 10,000 books from the University of Scranton to an off-site storage location last summer. Included will be the steps taken to get faculty buy in as well as the technical processes involved in executing the project, including: cataloging and logistical problems encountered along the way and what was done to overcome them, as well as side-projects that arose in connection with the project.

Sharon Wiles-Young will discuss Lehigh University’s Libraries’ use of multiple storage sites around campus to store its collections. The storage collections were consolidated into the current storage facility located on Lehigh's Mountaintop campus. Now that collection philosophies are changing between use of ILL and digital collections, learn how Lehigh is tackling this change by moving collections to storage and weeding the collection.

Erika Johnson will elaborate on the University of San Francisco’s massive move of over 200,000 journal volumes to remote storage during the summer of 2017. The move was undertaken in order to accommodate several new departments and the construction of new student collaborative and classroom spaces. She will share the challenges the library faced, the impacts on staff and services, and how they expect to manage this collection going forward.

Iron Mountain representative, Britt Mueller, will discuss some best practices in relocating and storing different types of library materials from a vendor perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Johnson

Erika Johnson

Associate Dean for Technical Services, University of San Francisco
avatar for Sheli Pratt-McHugh

Sheli Pratt-McHugh

Cataloging and Metadata Librarian, University of Scranton
Associate Professor, Sheli Pratt-McHugh is the Cataloging and Metadata Librarian and the Learning Commons Coordinator at the University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library. She also serves as Department Chair for the Library. She previously worked at the Scranton Public Library... Read More →
avatar for Iron Mountain Library Services

Iron Mountain Library Services

Library Services Solutions Architect, Iron Mountain
avatar for Narda Tafuri

Narda Tafuri

Coordinator of Technical Services, University of Scranton
Narda Tafuri is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Technical Services in the Weinberg Memorial Library at The University of Scranton, where she has been employed since 1994. She received her undergraduate degree in Liberal Arts with a Minor in Anthropology from the State University... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Wiles-Young

Sharon Wiles-Young

Director of Library Access Services, Lehigh University
Lehigh University Libraries, FOLIO, OLE, VuFind discovery layer, ILL and Acquisitions service models and workflows, Library Services in general



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

The Road to Effective Library Leadership: How Do I Get There From Here?
Library leadership is one of the much debated and talked about subjects in library and information science. Yet, librarians tend to not associate themselves in the context of leaders or leadership. Whether you’re a driven librarian or an ambitious young librarian, or you’re an ambitious and driven person, in fact, library leadership is a rather remote subject for most librarians and information professionals. Why is this case? This presentation will guide a walkthrough the world of library leaders and leadership.

This session is directed for early career librarians who are thinking about leadership or wondering about becoming a library leader. The session assumes that you are curious about leadership and someday, you want to be a leader if you are not one already. To encourage and guide early career librarians or even for library school graduate students, this session would offer much needed food for thought. What makes an effective leader? Can any person become a leader? How do I uncover the secrets of becoming a leader?

The presenters aim to deconstruct the myths about leaders and leadership. The challenge for the presenters is to be able to convince the audience how leadership happens in the library context and how to prepare yourself to be a library leader or to be a better leader (if you’re already a leader) by exploring how library leadership can be understood and developed. The current library leaders including administrators who want to create a culture of innovation, change of culture, and nurture future leaders are encouraged to join the session to share their point of view on leadership.

Speakers
avatar for Shin Freedman

Shin Freedman

Head of Scholarly Resources & Collections, Framingham State University
avatar for Jim Freedman

Jim Freedman

Independent Consultant
Jim Freedman is an independent consultant specializing in the development of next generation high potential leaders in multi-cultural organizations. With extensive experience in Korea, China, and the Philippines, Jim has a unique perspective on helping leaders become more effective... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Weathering the Storm with Ebook Auto-Upgrades
This is a tale of two academic libraries with aims to provide responsive collections that deliver what patrons need when they need it. This isn’t always possible with a budget constrained by limited state funding, inflationary pressure, and expectations that we should be able to provide access to everything. One strategy for connecting our communities with content is to purchase ebooks on a just-in-time basis (e.g., DDA ebook collections) alongside ebook frontfiles and backfiles. Our two libraries approached DDA differently: one preferred to purchase only single-user DDA ebooks as a way to contain costs, the other purchased a spectrum of DDA user-models. But both encountered situations where neither approach was the best fit for our patrons. In one case, the perfect storm happens: many users need access to a single-user ebook at the same time and under a tight deadline. When that storm hits, we’ve let our patrons down. In another case, more expansive user models led to reduced ROI. These are the situations that led our libraries to look for ways to upgrade ebook user models in real-time, without unnecessary mediation, and that avoided just-in-case purchasing. In this presentation we will describe two different implementations of EBSCO’s and Proquest’s ebook auto-upgrade service and share insights on how these services have worked for our two contexts. We will invite discussion of other ways to create the kind of responsiveness to ebooks that our users expect while recognizing fiscal, technical, and personnel constraints.

Speakers
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
Hilary Davis is Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries in Raleigh, NC. Her primary role is to provide leadership and direction in the Libraries’ overall collection development strategies, and play a leading role in the Libraries... Read More →
avatar for Teresa Hazen

Teresa Hazen

Head of Delivery, Description, and Acquisitions, The University of Arizona Libraries​
avatar for Lynn Whittenberger

Lynn Whittenberger

Associate Head, Acquisitions and Discovery (Monographs), North Carolina State University Libraries



Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

When Change is a “New” Concept: Using Your Library’s Past to Manage its Future
There seem to be three types of people in libraries: people who thrive on change, people who are change-averse, and people who support the idea of change but are resistant to its implementation. But the facts are these: we have to change. Library culture *should* be changing as rapidly as our collections, but organizational culture can often lag behind and library leaders need to be able to manage all of these types of changes - both actual and needed - simultaneously. Change in libraries can emerge from on the ground knowledge, out of strategic planning, or be imposed from outside the library. How do we manage expectations of myriad stakeholders, existing services, and various change projects? How can librarians at all levels be leaders in their organizations through both simple and complicated times of change?

Offering a set of approaches and tools for addressing change in the library and cultivating buy-in, this session will present three different perspectives on change management from leaders in three different libraries. Attendees will understand what change management means from the perspective of three different librarians, and how library challenges are tackled (keeping in mind culture, collections, and colleagues). Attendees will leave with a better understanding of how to approach change in their libraries; how to communicate with their colleagues about change; and how to maintain a positive attitude in the face of varying degrees of conflict within their libraries or institutions; and lead their colleagues through necessary changes to lead the library to a successful future.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Chase

Ashley Chase

Associate Director, Stetson University College of Law
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Lindsay Cronk

Head of Collection Strategies, University of Rochester
Lindsay Cronk is covered in tattoos and full of strong opinions.
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Collections Initiatives Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Rachel Fleming works on affordable course materials, scholarly communication, and collection assessment as Collections Initiatives Librarian at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Fleming has over ten years of experience in library technical services including collection development... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:30pm

And You May Ask Yourself, Well, How Did I Get Here? Library and Vendor Perspectives on Mapping, Data Visualization, and Geographic Analytics
Mapping, data visualization, and geographic analytics are increasingly important in many research fields: social sciences, business, public health, environmental studies, history, etc. Each year, more research data becomes available and more vendors offer products serving these research needs. In this proposed session, business and geography librarians from two universities and an owner of a mapping, spatial analysis, and GIS software development services company will offer library and vendor perspectives. Topics will include an overview of the different types of data and platforms, selection issues for libraries, campus training and promotion needs, issues vendors face in acquiring third party data and licensing it to libraries, and the future of these tools. We will also share recommendations and best practices to libraries providing these tools and services for their campuses.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Cramer

Steve Cramer

Business and Geography Librarian, UNC Greensboro
I serve as the UNCG Business & Geography Librarian as well as a Coleman Fellow for Entrepreneurship Education, with rank of associate professor. Previously I worked at Duke University and Davenport College. I'm co-founder of Business Librarianship in North Carolina (BLINC), a member... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Harwell

Kevin Harwell

Business Librarian, Penn State University
Kevin Harwell has been with the Schreyer Business Library since 2000. His areas of specialization are marketing, industry research and accounting. He is also very familiar with entrepreneurship resources, patents and trademarks. Kevin is the author of two Research Guides for en... Read More →
avatar for Charles Swartz

Charles Swartz

VP, Technology, SimplyAnalytics (formerly SimplyMap/Geographic Research, Inc.)



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Books On Demand: A New(er) Look to Print Monograph Acquisition
How do you respond to increasing library materials cost? Do you still provide enough, less, or more print books? How do you sustain access to library resources? In the past few years, Zach S. Henderson Library at Georgia Southern University faced these questions and more. As many libraries have done, Henderson Library responded by decreasing monograph acquisitions to allocate additional funds for serial acquisition. However, these challenges provided opportunities for the Library to be creative in purchasing monographs. One of the approaches the Library chose to explore was establishing a print demand-driven acquisition (pDDA) or Books on Demand program with ProQuest. Through this program, the Library has increased its access to print monographs despite experiencing budgetary challenges.

In this session, we will share with you the rationale, the process, the results, and the future of pDDA/Books on Demand at Georgia Southern University. Presenters will share experiences and lessons learned from this approach, which has been underway for over two years now. Skinner will present the history, challenges and opportunities, and the future of the program. Huwieler will discuss establishing and maintaining the program, including “what’s next” with Books on Demand from the vendor standpoint while Gujilde will share the process and results of the program from the library standpoint.

Attendees will leave with ideas on how to start and what to expect when planning or implementing similar programs in their libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Paolo P. Gujilde

Paolo P. Gujilde

Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian, National Louis University
CH

Cara Huwieler

Collections Consultant, ProQuest
DS

Debra Skinner

Department Head, Collection & Resource Services, Georgia Southern University
Bridging the Gap: Providing a Marketing and Support Framework for IR Services


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Communicating Collections to Stakeholders: The Good, the Bad, and the Spreadsheets
It is not uncommon for impactful collections decisions to be made behind closed doors and have an air of mystery surrounding them. Library users and non-collections librarians may be surprised to discover that a well-loved resource is no longer available or that a lesser-regarded resource was purchased instead of a resource they specifically requested. Management or non-collections librarians may fumble to answer questions about how their collections funding is being spent or how a resource is being received by users. How can collections librarians effectively and thoughtfully communicate their activities and the impact of their decisions to these various groups, particularly when those decisions are likely to be unpopular with their communities?

The objective of this presentation is to discuss ways in which librarians have communicated collections decisions, changes, and challenges to internal and external stakeholders. Best practices for data visualization and survey design, as well as advocacy and networking strategies are examples of some topics that will be addressed. Attendees can expect to be part of an interactive discussion on how to tailor messages about collections to their audience, create effective visuals for relaying data, foster important relationships, and improve communications within their libraries and across their institutions.

Speakers
BB

Beth Blanton-Kent

Collections Librarian, University of Virginia Library
avatar for Karen Gau

Karen Gau

Health Sciences Collection Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Glenn Johnson-Grau

Glenn Johnson-Grau

Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development, Loyola Marymount University
Glenn Johnson-Grau is Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University. He frequently reminds himself that all is flux and nothing stays still.
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Head of Collection Development, University of California, San Francisco



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:30pm

Critical Business Collections: Examining Key Issues using a Social Justice Lens
All academic librarians perform a balancing act between the needs of patrons, licensing restrictions, and the missions of our libraries. As part of the work to develop our campus collections, academic business librarians work with both schools and commercial vendors to provide resources that our business students and faculty require. Business publishers charge academic customers pennies on the dollar for access, but are likely to seek protections for their intellectual content by placing usage restrictions that run counter to what librarians would prefer. This can cause difficulties for librarians in serving their unique populations. This also can run counter to the central principles of “Critical Librarianship”, which is based on a foundation of social justice, the belief that everyone deserves equal opportunities and basic economic, political, and social rights. Balancing the needs of the publishers and business school communities with the principles of critical librarianship is a great challenge for everyone who serves these communities. Business librarians from across the US will explore ways in which collections and critical librarianship collide. Topics to be covered include the effects of database licenses on the intersection of theoretical academic work and practical business activities, challenges faced by public institutions supporting community entrepreneurs, and how the integration of critical pedagogy with information and data literacies can bring awareness to problems within current collections such as access to information, issues in data collection, and information creation. Through discussion, we hope to provide insight to ways in which libraries, as intermediaries between patrons and vendors, can help address these difficult problems.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Howard

Heather Howard

Business Information Specialist, Purdue University
avatar for Katharine Macy

Katharine Macy

Business & Economics Librarian, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction... Read More →
avatar for Alyson Vaaler

Alyson Vaaler

Business Librarian, Texas A&M University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Examining Streaming Video Cost-Per-Use across DDA and Subscription Aggregation at Multiple Institution Types
Whether credited to Mark Twain or Benjamin Disraeli, the quote: “There are lies, damned lies and statistics,” should be resonant for those in the business of evaluating streaming video usage and cost per use. Often data is presented from very limited and selected samples demonstrating the excellent cost-per-use of one vendor or purchase model over another vendor or purchase model. In this presentation, our aim is to present a broad data-set, capturing the cost per use of several institutions using both video aggregation products and DDA. We will avoid reference to specific vendors and specific products and only represent data from individual universities to illustrate rather than support findings from the broader data set.
In the past two years, video distributors have made significant strides in measuring engagement with, and the impact of streaming video. But let us not lose sight of the critical importance of cost-per-use in evaluating the different acquisition models available to libraries; most importantly, DDA and multi-disciplinary package subscription. Taken in sum: cost-per-use and broader measures of engagement and impact tell the complete story.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Oling

Rebecca Oling

Coordinator of Instruction and Literature Librarian, Purchase College Library
In addition to serving as coordination of instruction in the Purchase College Library, I also oversee collection development for the programs in literature/drama, film and media studies, and Jewish studies. As part of my responsibilities, I work closely with faculty teaching online... Read More →
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

Video Product Manager, Alexander Street/ProQuest
David Parker is SVP Video Products and Distribution for Alexander Street a ProQuest company – the leading provider of video, audio and unique, curated databases to the global university library market with more than 12,000 institutional customers. Prior to his role with Alexander... Read More →
CT

Cory Tucker

HEAD OF CONTINUING RESOURCES AND COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA LAS VEGAS
Cory Tucker is the Head of Continuing Resources & Collections at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries. The Continuing Resources & Collections Department is responsible for acquisition, licensing, access and maintenance of electronic resources; collection assessment, budgeting... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Handwritten Text Recognition: Artificial Intelligence and the future of Manuscript Search
Digital Humanities is an exciting area of scholarship that is continually evolving; empowered by the latest technology. Adam Matthew Digital is the first primary source publisher to utilise Artificial Intelligence to offer transformative search capabilities with Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) for its manuscript collections. This presentation will look at the history of automated search through OCR and the implications of HTR for the library and scholarly community and its potential impact on crowdsourced transcription initiatives. The panel will also look at HTR in action searching manuscripts spanning the 17th-19th Centuries from collections sourced from the British Library and The National Archives, UK. Video will be used to showcase additional feedback from scholars and archivists working with HTR. This session will also look at a new Open Access publishing solution, that will enable libraries and archives to harness HTR technology across their manuscript collections and the impact this will have on the Digital Humanities and the Open Access community.

Speakers
avatar for Khal  Rudin

Khal Rudin

Managing Director, Adam Matthew Digital
Khal Rudin is Managing Director of Adam Matthew Digital. Khal joined Adam Matthew in 2002 and over the last 15 years has helped the company grow rapidly and produce a large portfolio of primary source digital collections. Khal is passionate about working with the academic and library... Read More →
avatar for Meredith Schwartz

Meredith Schwartz

Executive Editor, Library Journal
Meredith Schwartz is Executive Editor for Library Journal, and author of the article "Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries."
BS

Bob Scott

Digital Humanities Librarian, Columbia University
avatar for John Tofanelli

John Tofanelli

Research Collections and Services Librarian for British & American History & Literature, Columbia University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Honoring Past Practices While Increasing Collection Budget Flexibility: Designing and Communicating a New Budget Model
When LBJ was president and the Beatles were all the rage, Southwest Texas State College adopted a library allocation formula. Five decades later, the Texas State University Libraries administration decided it was time to stop adjusting the formula and adopt a completely new collection budget model with more flexibility to meet changing needs.

In this session, we will discuss the three-year process we used to develop a new collection budget model, share our communication strategies with the campus, and discuss how the new model is impacting serials workflow from renewing journals to providing assessment data. Finally, we’ll ask attendees to suggest data we should collect to help us update the model as the marketplace and the university change.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Pope

Scott Pope

Continuing Resources Librarian, Texas State University
Scott Pope is the Continuing Resources Librarian at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. In the role, Scott coordinates the acquisitions, renewals, and cancellations of databases and serials. Prior to this role, Scott was the Monographic Acquisitions Librarian at Texas State... Read More →
avatar for Ginger  Williams

Ginger Williams

Administrative Librarian, Texas State University
I supervise acquisitions, collection development, and e-resource management for an emerging research university. We're working toward a more robust collection analysis program, so we can look at data trends when making decisions.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

In Research We Trust
In the era of fake news and alternative facts libraries play an important role by providing access to resources that are authoritative, reliable and undeniable trustworthy. What’s more, libraries must support a research process that is seamless in nature; one that users trust to lead them to the most relevant content in the most expedient way. For libraries, fulfilling this role is not without its many considerations. Libraries must provide a balanced collection, ensure ready discoverability of content and deliver precisely the experience and the resources that different users expect throughout the research process.

The pathway to trustworthy research depends on both the content sources and the technologies that support research along the way. From having access to and choice of trustworthy content, to the right collection development tools, to the technologies that provide seamless and unbiased access to the library’s collections - there is much to consider. So how can libraries best address these different areas to deliver the trust in research that users expect?

This panel will look at ways to bring trust to research. Panelists will look at the need for curated content and the ways to assess subscription resources. In addition, panelists will look at the research process and the tools that instill trust in research outcomes – from collection development, to discovery and ultimately seamless, reliable access to the library’s collections.

Speakers
TC

Toni Carter

Reference & Instruction Librarian, Instruction Coordinator, Women's Studies Liaison, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for George Hart

George Hart

Library Director, University of Massachusetts Lowell
avatar for Lisa Rose-Wiles

Lisa Rose-Wiles

Science Librarian/Associate Professor, Seton Hall University Libraries
Lisa Rose-Wiles is the Science Librarian at Seton Hall University Libraries in South Orange, New Jersey.  She holds an MLS from Rutgers University and a PhD in Biological Anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to moving into the library field, Lisa conducted... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Managing ETDs: the good, the bad, and the ugly
Mandating contribution of theses and dissertations to university archives and their electronic equivalents (ETDs) to an institutional repository (IR) is common practice. Optimizing workflows for archival print copies while managing electronic copies in an IR can be challenging given such factors as embargoes and the skillsets required to make theses and dissertations accessible, discoverable, and ultimately safely stashed where they belong. As rational processes were gradually developed at the University of Vermont, pitfalls and breakthroughs presented themselves, chiefly with regard to harvesting metadata to create records for both the IR and the library catalog. We will discuss our experience launching an ETD mandate, including campus outreach initiatives, and improvements to the various related processes (document submission, harvesting, embargo removal). We invite others to share their experiences and wisdom, recognizing that our collective past can be prologue to greatness.

Speakers
DT

Dan Tam Do

Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, University of Vermont
avatar for Laura Gewissler

Laura Gewissler

Director of Collection Management Services, University of Vermont
Laura Gewissler is the Director of Collection Management Services at the University of Vermont’s Bailey/Howe Library. She is currently responsible for coordination of collections, technical services, serials management and usage of remote storage. From 1988 to 2012, she served as... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:30pm

Serving Up Data on a Platter Fit for Research
Data and access to data are increasingly important for researchers and as a result, even non-data librarians are called upon to support data research and deliver solutions to issues that arise as researchers navigate through datasets. However, often when the data are purchased, services associated with them are considered only as an afterthought. What are the service aspects to consider when thinking about purchasing, providing access to or mining datasets? In this session, speakers will discuss data as a part of the collection-development process for librarians and share a planning process for offering services for dataset usage for research projects.
 
Meris Mandernach, Associate Professor and Head of Research Services, will highlight a process created at the Ohio State University Libraries, a large research institution that has implemented a service-focused assessment that can be used prior to data acquisition. She will detail key stakeholders to involve both within the libraries and around the university and share a working model of creating and planning for services around library-acquired data sources as well as a working checklist of steps involved when acquiring or providing data for research.  
 
Sayeed Choudhury, Associate Dean for Research Data Management at John Hopkins University, will then discuss how to curate the data produced by researchers in a way that integrates with library infrastructure. He will also present “principles of navigation” for how libraries can evolve data management services to support the changing needs of researchers and to help libraries shift the “deposit and download data” approach to a more dynamic, iterative, and efficient strategy.


The panel will conclude with a lively Q&A session with the audience.

Speakers
TB

Todd Baldwin

Executive Director of Online Library and Reference Publishing, SAGE Publishing
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Meris Mandernach

Meris Mandernach

Head, Research Services, The Ohio State University Libraries
Meris Mandernach is the Head of Research Services at The Ohio State University Libraries. She is responsible for developing, refining, assessing, and sustaining an evolving program of research services for faculty, researchers, and students throughout the university. She leads a... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:30pm

Shotgun Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Learning from History: Using Past Collection Decisions to Inform the Present (Heidi Tebbe)

Collection decisions can seem daunting to a librarian who is new to the job. One way for a new collections librarian to understand their subject funds is to examine the books that have been previously purchased with those funds. Information about these books such as subject headings, publishers, vendors, and content level can all provide valuable insight into a particular subject area and into the collection decisions that have been made for a given subject at a given institution.

In this session, I will discuss the results of my analysis of engineering, computer science, and physics monographs purchases at North Carolina State University using the R programming language, as well as the limitations of this kind of investigation. Data for this investigation was acquired from GOBI Library Solutions and using SirsiDynix WorkFlows; an overview of this process will be included. I will also provide an overview of functions and packages from the R programming language that can be used to clean, merge, and analyze purchase data.

2) Copyright Management of MOOC Resources in a Health Sciences Library (Katherine Green)

The Dahlgren Memorial Library (DML) serves a variety of patrons, has a number of different community partnerships, and is very integrated on a variety of levels in many of the programs, curricula, and research done at the medical center.

In April of 2016, the library was approached by a few of our researchers/faculty members to assist with a large project they had begun to create. In conjunction with our curriculum development group, the researchers were constructing an open education course or Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Big Data and Genomics. The library was brought on board to help navigate the complicated world of copyright.

My first challenge was to determine how other organizations had navigated copyright issues. One of the resources I consulted was Fowler and Smith’s article on Developing Library-based Copyright and Permissions Service for MOOCs (2013), which led me to other resources I could research for further understanding.

As we proceeded with the process, I would receive a Word document, outlining the concerns and specific question. Some of the images in question were from DML’s collection, some came from the National Cancer Institute, and others came from open access databases that used Creative Commons licenses. The next challenge was investigating each concern individually as each dealt with a different aspect of copyright. If it was determined that an image or video was unusable, we would find suitable alternatives from places such as the Open I database or Wikimedia Commons.

After meeting with the librarian, the researchers began to feel more comfortable navigating some of the copyright issues on their own. The group presented on their MOOC stating they felt they had a significant benefit in consulting a librarian in the beginning stages. The course was completed successfully this past May.

3) Focusing on the Big Picture: Strategic Alignment in Academic Libraries (Mimi Calter)

The academic landscape is changing, and as universities reassess their own missions and strategic objectives, libraries are challenged to maintain their own strategic vision in alignment. More critically, they are challenged to constantly refine procedures and daily activities to align with the vision. This Shotgun Session will briefly review alignment efforts in academic libraries and assess progress.

4) Inspiring Discovery Through Global Access to Free Biodiversity Literature (Barbara Ferry)

Much of the world’s taxonomic literature is available only to a few select libraries, providing a major impediment to global taxonomic research, especially in developing countries. The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is changing all that by providing free and open access to major scientific library collections. BHL is a global consortium of 18 member libraries and 15 affiliates who select and scan published literature from the 15th to the 21st centuries. About one-quarter of the 51 million pages in the database are post-1923, through cooperative arrangements BHL has made with publishers. This brief presentation will provide real-world examples of how BHL is used at global museums and universities to provide support for biodiversity research and how the Smithsonian Libraries and other member libraries work together to select and scan literature for the database.

5) Yikes! My elearning platform has content and my online journal is interactive! Shaping an Australian Library’s role in a world where everything’s becoming everything else. (Lisa Smith)

eLearning products (platforms, tools, resources) are increasingly converging as vendors and publishers move into new areas of opportunity and develop new business models for these complex and wide ranging product suites. This presents challenges for institutions and libraries in considering ways to select, negotiate, govern and manage such packages.

This presentation provides a case study, including what’s now and next, of the approach taken by Monash University Library, Australia, for others to consider in thinking about their own approaches. A series of questions will be posed during the session to engage in dialogue, through social media and the session Q&A.

In 2014-15 the Library led a review of the pedagogical, educational and financial value of a suite of enterprise elearning products in use at Monash University, involving key stakeholders, and using case studies and data analysis. The review found that medium to long term use led to improved efficiency, pedagogy and learning effectiveness while time taken to implement and embed in curriculum made short-term discontinuation impractical. A centrally coordinated approach to selection, licence negotiation, relationship management, implementation and management was also found to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Review recommendations on business ownership, funding, governance structures, management and evaluation processes now inform University decision-making.

In the etextbook space in particular, the Library’s experience has taught us that our involvement in provision of individually tailored and accessed etextbooks is not beneficial from a financial or user experience perspective; however Library opportunities to add institutional value exist where etextbooks are available to all University users and are not individually tailored. In this and other like spaces, the Library can play an important Institutional role in negotiation, budget certainty and cost effectiveness, governance and management.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hollandsworth

Economics, Finance & PRTM Librarian, Learning Commons Coordinator, Clemson University
Bobby Hollandsworth is the Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Business Reference Librarian, and RefWorks Administrator at RM Cooper Library on the campus of Clemson University. He serves as the library liaison to the departments of Economics, Finance, Agribusiness, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mimi Calter

Mimi Calter

Deputy University Librarian, Stanford University
avatar for Barbara Ferry

Barbara Ferry

Head, Natural and Physical Sciences Libraries, Smithsonian Libraries
As Head, Natural & Physical Sciences Libraries at the Smithsonian, I lead a team of 18 staff serving the information needs of scientists and educators. Library staff work at branches located in Washington DC, Edgewater Maryland, Front Royal Virginia, and Panama.
avatar for Katherine Greene

Katherine Greene

Resources & Copyright Support Librarian, Georgetown University Dahlgren Memorial Library
Katherine Greene is a Resources and Copyright Support Librarian at Dahlgren Memorial Library where she has worked on a variety of different tasks and projects since June of 2014. She earned her MSLS degree at The Catholic University of America in May 2014.
avatar for Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

Library Director, Education, Monash University
Lisa Smith is the Director, Education. Her portfolio includes oversight of the Library’s engagement with the University’s education agenda, including through information research skills, learning skills and elearning, with a number of faculty areas, and broad oversight of several... Read More →
avatar for Heidi Tebbe

Heidi Tebbe

Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science, NCSU Libraries
Heidi Tebbe is the Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science at North Carolina State University. She manages collections for subjects including engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, and data science.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Spanning the (Sometimes) Great Divide: Connecting Library Resources to Digital Scholarship
For decades, library publishers have provided primary source materials in a variety of formats to academic libraries all over the world. As the breadth and depth of this content has increased, the page counts alone have led us to think about digital collections in both qualitative and quantitative ways. During that time, our industry has seen enormous change as data analysis broadens the spectrum of understanding beyond traditional scholarship research and close reading. In the wake of this research evolution, many academic libraries still struggle to find a seat at the digital humanities table despite the myriad of resources available today that are perfectly suited for text data mining and driving visualizations.

In this session, the panelists will discuss the varying levels of student and faculty engagement at their own institutions related to digital scholarship practices and projects that require a data analysis component. In addition, the panelists will talk about their experiences with new resources that help bridge the gap between library collections and the use of digital scholarship tools, which have the potential to reveal new scholarship that traditional research methods do not or cannot accomplish.

The session will conclude with a discussion about the role libraries can play in driving the evolution and adoption of digital scholarship across the campus, especially in the classroom.

Speakers
MC

Marc Cormier

Director, Product Management, Gale, a Cengage company
avatar for Wendy Perla Kurtz

Wendy Perla Kurtz

Digital Humanities Specialsit, Gale
Wendy Perla Kurtz, PhD, is a Digital Humanities Specialist at Gale where she assists in the evolution of Gale’s Digital Scholarship Program, including the support, and development of Gale’s Digital Scholar Lab—a research environment designed to assist digital scholarship in... Read More →
avatar for Clifford Wulfman

Clifford Wulfman

Coordinator of Library Digital Initiatives, Princeton University
Digital Humanities; periodical studies; magazine digitization


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Straightening the Long and Winding Road to Open Acces
Even though open access is now a shared vision of the world’s academic communities, research councils, and funding bodies, only 14% of the world’s scholarly journals are available open access on publication, and the bulk of the leading scientific journals remain locked behind paywalls. New Open Access publishing initiatives have produced laudable results, but are not enough to liberate scholarly communications from the confines of an antiquated, print-based publishing system and the grip of hybrid costs and increasing subscription costs.
Based on data analyses conducted by the Max Planck Digital Library and described in their widely-read White Paper, a rapid transformation of the subscription system is possible and librarians have a leading role to play.

In this session, two librarians will present their strategies to propel open access forward, enabling the transformation of today’s corpus of scholarly journals from subscription to open access.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Campbell

Colleen Campbell

OA2020 Partner Development, Max Planck Digital Library
Motivated by a strong personal commitment to the principle of Open Access, Colleen Campbell recently joined the Max Planck Digital Library, based in Munich, Germany, to lead Partner Development in the global Open Access 2020 Initiative. In this role she facilitates collaboration among... Read More →
RS

Rachael Samberg

Scholarly Communications Officer, University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Ralf Schimmer

Ralf Schimmer

Head of Scientific Information Provision, Max Planck Digital Library
As Head of Scientific Information Provision at the Max Planck Digital Library in Munich, Germany, Dr Schimmer is responsible for licensing strategy and a broad range of Open Access and other innovative information services supporting the researchers of the over 80 advanced research... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Sustainable Digital Preservation: An innovative partnership in the long-term preservation of special collections materials
Collaborative digital preservation efforts have yielded exciting partnerships supporting the creation and ongoing management of digital archives. The Minnesota Digital Library, and PDLA are leading examples designed to provide digital preservation, discovery and access to cultural material.

But in the face of shrinking institutional and state budgets, some libraries and archives find their substantial investments in digital assets forfeited. Some have joined public/private partnerships, but in the wake of severe defunding, have seen their objects disappear into the internet ether. In other cases, they have possession of their objects, but those objects are housed on obsolete media rendering them inaccessible. After losing tens (or hundreds) of thousands of dollars on short-term digital efforts, many are reverting to old-technology (microfilm) as a tried-and-true preservation option.

Technological evolution is always messy. These setbacks in preservation work are not an excuse to turn back to old technology, which addresses immediate preservation needs but is less-than-ideal in exposing hidden collections. These challenges are not insurmountable.

With partners experienced in technological development and implementation of digital preservation, we can leverage multiple funding sources (budget lines, grant funds, gifts), and develop sustainable digital products that preserve our items, increase access and discoverability, and remove the onus of technological obsolescence from librarians and archivists.

St. Olaf College Libraries and East View Information Services have co-created a preservation-quality, searchable, digital archive of the College’s Manitou Messenger. East View provided preservation-level digital archiving, and created a custom database with article level discoverability for the College. They will safeguard against hardware and software obsolescence for a reasonable annual fee that our research shows is lower than an annual budget to transition to microfilm. We invite our colleagues facing preservation challenges and struggling with sustainable digital outputs to learn about our project and its success.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Barbosa-Jerez

Mary Barbosa-Jerez

Head of Strategy for Library Collections & Archives, St. Olaf College
Mary Barbosa-Jerez has served as the Head of Collection Development at St. Olaf College since September 2008. Her work includes oversight of the College’s Library collections, Special Collections and Digital Initiatives. Her professional interests include the positive introduction... Read More →
MP

Michael Peters

Sales & Account Manager, East View Information Services


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Textbook Collections: Required of our students, Unwelcome in our academic library?
What happens when library policies and philosophies of the past run counter to user desires of the present?

At Western University (Ontario, Canada) we have an official collections policy to avoid collecting textbooks, as they fall outside of the carefully librarian-driven, research-heavy philosophies that drive our acquisitions process. However, in every survey to students and faculty, we find requests for textbooks on reserve and praise for the books we already have.

In response, we conducted a statistical analysis of textbooks and our collections: we already provided access to nearly 40% of required course texts (despite our policies), and these were by far the most highly used materials in the library. We applied a cost per use analysis and mapped required course texts against similar books by call number range and fund code to discover they outperformed “regular” books significantly. We used this data to present to library management and prove that there is a role for systematic textbook collection in the university library.

We would like this presentation to involve significant audience participation, through discussion questions and sharing about textbook use at their own libraries, different programs for textbook acquisition, and attitudes toward textbooks and the role of the academic library.

We will also share the source code for an applet we designed in R (statistical programming language), which will be posted on GitHub for individual librarians to use and modify, as well as the process we used for comparing textbooks to the regular collection.

Speakers
avatar for Leanne Olson

Leanne Olson

Metadata Management Librarian, Western University
Leanne Olson is currently a Metadata Management Librarian at Western University, and will become Western's new the Digitization and Digital Preservation Librarian in May 2018. She has worked at Western Libraries since 2008 and regularly seeks out opportunities to teach, despite her... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

The Big Deal: Perspectives on All-Inclusive Models
While budget constraints have grown tighter over the recent years, academic librarians nationwide remain steadfast in their commitment to providing their patrons with access to the widest possible range of content. For large academic libraries and consortia whose licenses are particularly robust, the administrative burden of renewals--reconciling title lists, deciding what to keep and what to drop, grappling with unpredictable price increases—often feels in conflict with their own institutional goals.

After several years spent in consult with librarians around the world, Wiley launched the Database Model in 2014 to address the complications and cumbersome nature of its previous journal licensing model. For institutions and consortia that already had access to the majority of Wiley journals, the Database Model was designed to offer better return on investment by offering increased access, predictable spend and reduced administrative costs.

This session will focus on the experience of several librarians who are using Wiley’s all-inclusive Database Model as well as other publisher’s similar models. Attendees can expect to hear about the impact of all-inclusive models and the advantages and challenges of this type of model vs. other types of big deals.

Additional time for questions and an open discussion with the audience will also ensure engagement and facilitate lively discussion.

Moderators
DF

David Fisher

VP – Global Library Sales, Wiley

Speakers
avatar for Corey Halaychik

Corey Halaychik

Co-Director, The Library Collective
Corey Halaychik is an author and award winning librarian whose work and research have focused on improving efficiency, teamwork, and leadership skill development. He is also the co-founder and co-director of The Collective whose goal is to redefine the professional development landscape for next-generation librarians... Read More →
avatar for Jason Price

Jason Price

Director of Licensing Operations, SCELC
Jason S. Price is Director of Licensing Operations at the SCELC Library Consortium. He earned a doctorate in plant evolutionary ecology from Indiana University Bloomington where he gained in depth experience as a graduate student researcher and teacher and capped it off with a Masters... Read More →
WS

Wendy Shelburne

Electronic Resources Librarian, Associate Professor, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
GS

Gracemary Smulewitz

Head of Collection Services and Resources Sharing, Rutgers University Libraries



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

The Impact of Library Discovery Systems: Sharing Evidence from Libraries and Publishers
There is evidence of rising usage of library discovery systems by patrons, both in absolute numbers, as well as in comparison to other research tools such as Google Scholar. But what is the impact for libraries, publishers, and users?

In this session, an academic librarian and an information provider discuss whether the increased usage of library discovery systems has had an impact on the usage of their material. What drives usage, how can we measure it, and what have we learned?

The Colorado School of Mines will present results from the library perspective and draw conclusions about the impact of the increased usage of discovery systems on the role libraries play in supporting teaching, learning, and research.

Alexander Street Press will discuss how collaboration with discovery vendors impacts the usage on their platform, obstacles they have encountered on the way, and lessons they have learned for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Eastman-Mullins

Andrea Eastman-Mullins

VP Product Management, ProQuest / Alexander Street
avatar for Andrew French

Andrew French

Director of Sales Operations, Ex Libris
avatar for Laura Guy

Laura Guy

Systems Librarian, Colorado School of Mines, Arthur Lakes Library



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Transforming Textbook Affordability: A Library and Vendor Collaboration
Libraries and publishers are keenly aware of high-quality ebooks in their collections, ripe for use as assigned textbooks. Faculty, however, rarely think to check the library when choosing textbooks, instead relying traditional selection, publishing, and distribution channels. As a result, students are burdened with skyrocketing cost, frequently exceeding $200 per book, some students do not buy required text or delay taking courses if they cannot afford the book. Lawmakers and academic administrators are aware of the extraordinary expense of textbooks and students’ predicament. In Florida, legislation and governing boards mandated that universities promote Textbook Affordability (TA).

In this context, the University of Central Florida Libraries (UCF) and Taylor and Francis (T&F) collaborated to use library-licensed ebooks to improve TA. In 2016, UCF compared the university-wide assigned textbooks list with already-owned or purchasable DRM-friendly books. For a sub-selection of courses we reviewed number of enrolled students, cost per student for the print textbook, and price paid by the library for a DRM-friendly version. The results were encouraging, showing a large potential ROI and high usage of the selected ebooks. We expanded the project in 2017, with increased outreach to inform faculty about digital options and matching additional courses with already-purchased ebooks. Simultaneously, T&F monitored textbook orders from UCF and informed individual faculty if a DRM-free version was available in the UCF Library or eligible for library purchase.

The presenters will outline the project background, methodology used for assessing the ROI and potential savings, outreach to faculty, assessment and outcomes. We will discuss the UCF and T&F collaboration and their perspectives on TA. Finally, we will address the scalability and sustainability of the effort and give advice for any libraries the want to undertake a similar effort.

Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Elias

Evelyn Elias

Library Sales Director, Taylor & Francis
why I love what I do: | "Bookselling was and is for me a cultural and political expression, an expression of progressive change, of a challenge to oppressive authority, of a search for a community of values which can act as an underpinning of a better world. The true profit in bookselling... Read More →
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida
So, I have this idea that we, collectively, and I mean ALL libraries, need to create ubiquitous tool to connect people everywhere to library content they can use. | I'm the eResources Librarian at the University of Central Florida. I've bounced around the academic library for... Read More →
YZ

Ying Zhang

Head, Acquisitions and Collection Services, University of Central Florida
Ying is the Head of the Acquisitions & Collection Services Department at the Univ. of Central Florida Libraries in Orlando, FL. Her main responsibilities include managing the materials budget and overseeing the entire acquisitions and collection services in all formats for UCF Libraries... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Using Historical Interlibrary Loan Data and OCLC to Support, to Downsize our Print Journal Collection
In 2014 Wayne State University closed its Science & Engineering Library (SEL) converting the building into a mediated storage collection. In 2017 the University received funding from the State of Michigan to convert the SEL into lab and classroom space intended to support our various STEM programs. This project would have a significant impact on our print journal collection, system wide, due to the 600,000 volumes housed in SEL and the limited available space to absorb them in other parts of the library system. This challenge required a radical downsizing of this collection in the most responsible way possible while minimizing the deleterious impact on faculty and student research. Our starting point was using historical data extracted from our Atlas© Illiad database covering 2010-15, in addition to other data sources. Using historical document delivery and lending data we were able to lay the groundwork for making informed decisions about retention candidates. In order to advance the project we partnered with OCLC’s Sustainable Collection Services (SCS) to provide us with access to our Illiad data, title level holdings in Worldcat to compare our titles to, and the technical expertise needed to clean-up and make sense of the data. As we began work on the project the criteria we considered included: usage, special collection status, completeness of the run held, alternative sources of access, and content issues. From a Collection Development perspective, the main focus of this project has been assuring that the faculty and students will continue to have access to the content of weeded journals and would experience minimum delay between the point of identification and having it in-hand. The goal of this presentation is to demonstrate one of many possible uses of the data currently sitting in various ILL databases that can be used to make data-driven collection management decisions.

Speakers
PB

Paul Beavers

Coordinator for Collection Development & Assessment, Wayne State University
avatar for Andy  Breeding

Andy Breeding

Consulting Software Engineer, OCLC-Sustainable Collections Services
Founding partner of Sustainable Collection Services. A long-time resident of the intersection between libraries and technology. Interested in collection analytics, visualization, and data-driven decision making. Always looking for a good eatery!
avatar for Mike Hawthorne

Mike Hawthorne

Director, Resource & Collections strategy Services, Wayne State University
avatar for Brittany Hill

Brittany Hill

Graduate Student Assistant, Wayne State University
A Graduate Student Assistant for Wayne State University Libraries, and a student in the Wayne State University School of Information Science. Interests are in youth services in public libraries, but has experience in academic libraries as well.
avatar for James Van Loon

James Van Loon

Science Librarian, Wayne State University Libraries
* Science Librarian at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI | * MS Mechanical Engineering and MLIS from Wayne State University | * Provides research and instructional support to the College of Engineering | * Provides research data services as a member of the library’s RDS... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

When Library Science and Data Science Meet
This presentation will focus on a use case in which information from library scientists helped data scientists craft a methodology for better understanding cyber risk behaviors. You will hear the first-hand story of the experiences and lessons learned in building the relationship between library and data sciences.

The project referenced in this use case was a data experiment based on statistical inference, the process of drawing conclusions about populations or scientific truths from data. Although there are many theories and modes for analyzing inference, this project focused on the complexities of the performance of the solution and the correctness of inference. In other words, how good could we get at educated guessing for missing, bias or unobserved data, and how well could we perform as a team to provide a proposed solution for different problem sets to the same enterprise problem – cyber risk.

In data science, it is about reliability and repeatability for any solution to be trusted, in library science it is about resources and provenance. How could we define, design, and provide references of measurable data attributes for components and features of a taxonomy for the data science problem? Our working hypothesis became the thought for an interactive intelligent taxonomy for the data scientists to reference as an aid to build a better data driven equation/computation/algorithm.

From the use case story, you will be provided background on the data science process, how library science intersects in that process, how data gets messy very quickly, and how rules can go out the window. Perspectives are a key component to a good working relationship between data scientists and library scientists. Get to know and understand the differences in the communities that will help you build a better data project.

Speakers
KS

Katherine Smith

Partner, Keys 2 Action
avatar for Leslie Wilfong

Leslie Wilfong

Data & Information Management, Keys 2 Action
Leslie Wilfong is a founding member of Keys 2 Action with a passion around organizational design, systems thinking, and storytelling for impact. As one of the co-creators of the data science team at Central Intelligence Agency, Leslie understands the powerful impact well-structured... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Whose Data Is It, Anyway?: Unpacking Conflicting Definitions of Book Metadata
Book metadata has a long and varied life cycle, from publishers to aggregators to catalogers, librarians and consumers. There are many differences between the way metadata is originally defined and utilized by publishers, then ingested and disseminated by aggregators, and the way it’s leveraged by librarians and end users. Like a game of metadata telephone as you move farther from the origin, the differences between the original intent of the data and the current use can vary greatly with unintended consequences. One such example is complexity surrounding publication date across publishers, aggregators and end users. What is the difference between publication date, content creation date, original publication date, on sale date, etc…? Are they synonymous or are they meant to represent different indicators and how does the original provenance of the data affect the downstream users?

This session will present a study of the variety of kinds and uses of metadata seen from the perspectives of publishers, aggregators and librarians. The discussion will dissect information gathered from a survey of academic publishers, and look to propose that the industry standardize these definitions for the integrity of the data and the benefit of all. Additionally, the session will seek the opinions and suggestions of those present to help resolve some of the tensions uncovered by this research.

Speakers
AC

Angela Carreno

Head of Collection Development, New York University
Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of... Read More →
JE

Jon Elwell

Manager Collection Development, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Nina Servizzi

Nina Servizzi

Associate Dean for Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services, New York University
avatar for Priscilla Treadwell

Priscilla Treadwell

Director of Digital Sales, Princeton University Press



Wednesday November 8, 2017 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:10pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsors
avatar for Springer Nature

Springer Nature

Springer Nature is one of the world’s leading global research, educational and professional publishers, created in 2015 through the combination of Nature Publishing Group, Palgrave Macmillan, Macmillan Education and Springer Science+Business Media.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 4:10pm - 4:40pm
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:40pm

Charleston Fast Pitch Competition
Modeled on venture capital funding competitions, the CHARLESTON FAST PITCH COMPETITION will provide two monetary awards of $2,500 to further support the development and implementation of compelling library innovations. Finalists will present their projects to a panel of experts and Charleston Conference attendees for feedback and to determine the two grand prize winners.

Come prepared to hear pitches from the four finalists and to vote for your favorite using text message voting. 

Judges:
Kent Anderson, Jim O'Donnell, and Amy Brand

Finalists: 
  • Boaz Nadav-Manes, Brown University Library
  • Katharine Hall Baldwin and Meghan Burke, Marymount University 
  • Caroline Muglia, University of Southern California
  • Cheryl E. Ball, West Virginia University Libraries
More information about the application process. 

Moderators
avatar for Steve Goodall

Steve Goodall

Founder and President, The Goodall Family Foundation
Stephen (Steve) Goodall is the retired President and CEO of J.D. Power and Associates, a leading market research firm specializing in customer satisfaction and buyer behavior. He started his career at J.D. Power in 1978 and opened the company’s first satellite office in Detroit... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kent Anderson

Kent Anderson

Chief Executive Officer, RedLink
avatar for Amy Brand

Amy Brand

Director, MIT Press
Amy Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Previously, she served as VP Academic and Research Relations and VP North America at Digital Science. From 2008 to 2013, Brand worked at Harvard University, first as Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication... Read More →
avatar for Jim O'Donnell

Jim O'Donnell

University Librarian, Arizona State University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 4:40pm - 5:40pm
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Poster Sessions and Happy Hour Networking Events
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions and our new Virtual Poster kiosks. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages. We will also have a "Speed Networking" session available in the Calhoun Room nearby to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. Don't miss it!

Moderators
TG

Tom Gilson

Associate Editor, Against the Grain

Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Speed Networking
New to the Charleston Conference, the speed networking session is designed to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. This session will allow vendors to connect directly with librarians.

How it works: you will have brief 3-minute meetings with attendees at the event (one minute per person and one minute for discussion). These quick meetings are the starting point for conversation and networking throughout the conference and beyond. Make the most out of your conference investment through this unique session.

Moderators
avatar for Carol Kennedy

Carol Kennedy

Social Media Consultant, CAROL APOLLO DIGITAL SERVICES

Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

01 Building a Collection Management Cycle from Scratch: One Library’s Quest for On-going Assessment of Collections
Most libraries share the lofty goal of wanting to provide the most relevant and useful materials for our unique library users. However, the technical details of meeting this goal through collection assessment can be challenging and full of roadblocks, especially in light of the fact that our collections must continually adapt as the needs of our users change. This session will detail one library’s quest to develop and implement an on-going Collection Management Cycle to: 1) ensure library collections are current and relevant to library users, 2) increase purchasing accountability and the wise stewardship of public funds, 3) support selectors by providing information that is critical to making valuable purchasing decisions, and 4) improve the processes and procedures that underlie effective collection development practices. The presenters will share the process for developing this cycle as well as the research behind the choices that were made. While the pilot year for this cycle has just begun, attendees will learn how the library is working through obstacles and developing structures to ensure the success of this program.

Speakers
avatar for Tricia Lantzy

Tricia Lantzy

Health Sciences & Human Services Librarian, California State University San Marcos


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

02 Getting Something Out of a Whole Lotta Nothing: Making Worldshare Evaluation Work for You
In April 2016, the University of Kansas (KU) Libraries embarked on a year-long collection analysis project using the OCLC Worldshare Collection Evaluation tool, similar to a project that had been undertaken eight years earlier using the OCLC Collection Analysis tool. One librarian was assigned to coordinate the project and was responsible for developing a project plan and gathering and analyzing the data in an organized and consistent manner. From the beginning of the project, significant problems were encountered, but enough data was gathered for part of the project to proceed to the next level.

With the limitations encountered using the Worldshare tool, the focus of the project became a geographic peer comparison. Building on a recently established cooperative e-book acquisition program with Kansas State University, the analysis attempted to identify more potential collaborative collection development opportunities. The Worldshare product was used for data mining to identify strengths and weaknesses of each institution at the subject level. External data sources were also tapped to enhance the study.

In this session, KU Librarians will share their project planning process and results. Attendees will learn about the problems encountered and how those obstacles were overcome utilizing creative problem-solving.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections... Read More →
avatar for Corinne Forstot-Burke

Corinne Forstot-Burke

Performing Arts and Humanities Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
avatar for Amalia Monroe-Gulick

Amalia Monroe-Gulick

Collection Assessment Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries
Amalia holds an MLS from Indiana University, as well as a BS and MS in political science from Illinois State University. She has worked at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

03 Taking the Long View: A Case Study of E-Book Usage at a Comprehensive Research University
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (more commonly known as Virginia Tech) made its first major acquisition of e-books over a dozen years ago with a large purchase of new e-book collections from Springer. While it has evolved over time, that business relationship has continued forward to the present day. Currently, the library’s online holdings include most of the available frontlist collections from what is now Springer Nature, as well as the Springer Book Series and the Springer Book Archives. In all, the University Libraries at Virginia Tech make over 120,000 e-books available to patrons through the SpringerLink platform. The cumulative usage of this material represents over 1.75 million downloads by the university community just since 2012.

The large number of titles available and the long-term nature of the acquisitions that have been made provide unique opportunities for in-depth analysis. The Springer e-book collections also offer a variety of material types including monographs, textbooks, and reference works integrated onto the same platform. This session will provide a case study of Springer e-book usage at Virginia Tech. In the process, it will showcase how working directly with a vendor partner can provide an enhanced and more multifaceted view of usage. Participants will benefit from seeing real-world data from a major research university analyzed in a variety of ways and have an opportunity not only to ask questions but also to suggest further avenues for analysis and exploration. Attendees will also see how such data might be used to better inform future collection management decisions

Speakers
avatar for Edward Lener

Edward Lener

Associate Director for Collection Management, Virginia Tech
Edward Lener is Associate Director of Collection Management in the University Libraries at Virginia Tech and College Librarian for the Sciences. Edward is the university's representative to the Collections Committee of the VIVA library consortium and a co-author of the book Graduate... Read More →
MM

Mitch Moulton

Account Development Manager, Springer Nature



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

04 Assessing a Rarely-Weeded Print Monograph Collection Using OCLC’s GreenGlass : The Case of Santa Clara University Library
In summer 2017, Santa Clara University (SCU) Library contracted with OCLC’s Green Glass (part of their Sustainable Collection Services) to provide primary-level collection assessment data to explore our print monograph collection, which had never been systematically weeded. GreenGlass is an automated collection analysis tool that offers libraries a way to measure and visualize collection attributes and filter results by multiple factors, such as date of publication, circulation, and language (https://www.oclc.org/en/sustainable-collections.html). At SCU, our focus was on evaluating our print monograph collection to implement a systematic, “rules-based” weeding project employing automated tools. The use of GreenGlass, which can specifically tailor collection data to agreed-upon parameters, allowed us to avoid one of the stumbling blocks to weeding at SCU - the emotional connections to collections built over time. Since SCU is primarily a teaching-focused university with few post-graduate departments, our constituents’ needs rarely require research-level collections. Historically, SCU library lore makes no mention of any large-scale or organized weeding of print monographs, and our aggregate collection age and redundancy reflected that lack of attention. Based on this need to weed, our research questions for this analysis were focused on the use of the collection and how it serves not only our local users, but our peer and consortial partner libraries. Our analysis needs were met with GreenGlass, since it contains a component for collection comparison to self-selected peer libraries. The results of our new collection analysis paved the way for an efficient and successful weeding project that is currently underway. This poster will share data from GreenGlass showing our “before” weeding and where we hope to be “after.”

Speakers
avatar for Tina E Chrzastowski

Tina E Chrzastowski

Head of Access & Delivery Services, Santa Clara University Library
avatar for Wen-Ying Lu

Wen-Ying Lu

Head of Cataloging, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
Wen-ying Lu is the Head of Cataloging at Santa Clara University (SCU) Library. She manages a unit responsible for cataloging, database maintenance and firm-order acquisitions. She is currently overseeing the unit of Electronic Resources & Serials on an interim basis. Prior to SCU... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

05 An Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery Dashboard that Powers Better Decision Making in Collection Development and in Acqusitions
The poster is going to share how our Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery (ILL/DD) and Discovery and Innovation units collaborated to develop a dashboard that tracks journal requests delivered either via document delivery or were borrowed along with associated copyrights costs and fees. The dashboard was developed to aid the library in better informed of what is being requested by our users, what are the financial costs of those requests, and to acquire this knowledge in a timely manner. The dashboard also serves as a means to inform our collection development and acquisitions units of our patron’s requests and costs when considering journal purchases or during our annual journal review. The dashboard can be accessed via the library's homepage and is available to selectors, faculty and any interested user.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Hawthorne

Mike Hawthorne

Director, Resource & Collections strategy Services, Wayne State University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

06 Cleaning Data, or More Neat Excel Tricks to make it Easier
Librarians deal with data from a variety of sources and each source can be unique in how it presents in Excel. Cleaning data is inevitable and some of worst is patron supplied data. Here are some basic and not so basic tips and tricks to deal with disappearing leading zeros, consistency in case, trimming those fields, tables for all, and how pivot tables can be your friend.

Speakers
BB

Barbara Bishop

Reference Librarian, Auburn University Libraries


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

07 E-Preferred Approval Plans – Is This the Right Choice for an Academic Library?
Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries implemented an e-preferred approval plan in December 2010. The goal was to achieve better oversight of monograph purchases, while responding to users’ increasing demands for library resources in both print and electronic formats.

To determine the impact of the e-preferred approval plan on the library’s monograph collections, an evaluation of the print and e-books purchased from GOBI Library Solutions (formerly known as YBP) in the past six fiscal years was conducted. Acquisition and usage data was analyzed in the context of the collection development policies maintained by the TAMU Libraries.
Study results support evidence-based collection acquisition and management decisions of monographs in print and electronic formats. The results also inform whether e-books effectively support the TAMU research and curricula and to what extent hybrid print and electronic collections should co-exist to support diverse user information needs.

The attendees will learn how to evaluate and tweak approval plans to adequately supply the monograph titles needed by an academic community. The project is scalable to an academic library of any size: large, medium or small.

Speakers
ST

Simona Tabacaru

Collection Development Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Simona Tabacaru is a Collection Develoment Librarian at Texas A&M University Libraries. Her research interests include: Collection Assessment, E-approval Plans, Patron Driven Acquisitions, and Electronic Resource Management Systems.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

08 It’s Getting Hot In Here! Heat Mapping and Data Gathering for Space Analysis and Design
As libraries continue to shift their focus away from in-house stacks and toward the idea of the library as a hub for research, collaboration, and discovery, it has become increasingly important for us to be able to make proactive, data-driven decisions about the design of our physical spaces. Beyond gate counts and traditional metrics, though, how can we gather data on patron usage of our existing spaces? Butler University Libraries used SUMA, an open source web-based assessment toolkit, to conduct a semester-long heat mapping and data gathering project to observe the habits of library users as they interact with our spaces.

Over the course of the semester, faculty and staff at the library gathered distinct sets of usage data at different times, dates, and points in the semester. These sets comprised more than 1,700 individual data points. Using SUMA’s analytics feature, we generated both a heat map for immediate visualization of patron interactions with the library’s spaces and a cleaned data set for further analysis, which revealed patterns that helped us answer the following questions:

Do patrons bring their own devices to the library?
To what extent do patrons use our print materials in-house?
Are patrons totally silent or having quiet conversations?
Are patrons eating/drinking?
What times of day are different parts of the library seeing most use?
How are library computers being used?
Are patrons working with multiple screens?
Are patrons studying solo? Collaborating? Sharing tables?

This poster session will walk attendees through the space assessment process from start to finish. Beginning with setting up your institution’s instance of SUMA and ending with techniques for synthesizing and visualizing your data, the poster will also incorporate suggestions for managing workflows, being intentional in choosing metrics, and examples of Butler’s process from beginning to end.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Menard

Laura Menard

Health Sciences Librarian, Butler University
I graduated from UNC Chapel Hill with my MLS in 2011. For the past three years I've been the Health Sciences Librarian at Butler University in Indianapolis, IN. My liaison areas are pharmacy, PA, health sciences, communication sciences and disorders, and science technology and society... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

09 Journal Packages: Another Look at Predicting COUNTER and ILL Use
A recent study by Scott (2016) examined how ILL (interlibrary loan) requests correlate to COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) usage in newly-subscribed journal packages. The study posited that a 1:17 (ILL:COUNTER) ratio could be used to predict journal usage in new packages or to predict ILL usage for journal titles if a package is canceled. Our project replicated this study with a different journal package by comparing ILL usage for the year preceding the acquisition of a new Sage journal package to COUNTER usage for the following year. Analysis revealed a similar ILL to COUNTER usage ratio but also some surprising findings related to denials and to overall package usage.

Speakers
BB

Barbara Bishop

Reference Librarian, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Adelia Grabowsky

Adelia Grabowsky

Collections Team, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Liza Weisbrod

Liza Weisbrod

Auburn University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

10 Looking Good! Slicing and Dicing with Dashboards to Visualize Data in Excel
Excel dashboards allow you to use tables, charts and other data visualizations to tell a story about your data. After you have set up the initial pivot tables, you create slicers to connect allowing the data to dynamically sync. You will then be able to drill down and visually show your dean and/or liaisons the fund balances, titles, checkout statistics or other information you would like displayed. This poster will show the steps to creating the pivot tables, the slicers and the visual dashboard.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Winecoff

Michael Winecoff

Associate Dean for Collection Services, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Associate Dean for Collection Services and oversee Collections and Acquisitions. Before taking this position I gained valuable paraprofessional experience as a copy cataloger, catalog maintenance coordinator and supervisor of the Accounts Payable and Receiving section... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

11 Predictive Models for Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) Expenditures
This poster will present linear, exponential, and logarithmic models developed using EXCEL tools and will examine the role of seasonality in predicting FY17 DDA expenditures at George Washington University based on earlier year’s expenditure data. This poster will be of interest to those interested in experimenting with predictive models in analyzing DDA expenditures.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Bezanson

Deborah Bezanson

Senior Research Librarian, George Washington University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

12 Six Years of Data on Patron Driven Acquisitions will Tell You A LOT about Book Demand and Availability.
The University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Library has run a user-initiated request service for new academic books that fits the same profiles used by the subject specialists at the library for many years. Books not bought by a subject librarian can be requested for a rush purchase by an affiliated user on campus.
This service has run smoothly for over six years and the older records have been allowed to sit in the OPAC as demand has been stable but not overwhelming. The service compliments all the other ordering mechanisms in place at the Library to be sure that users have options to obtain newly released titles.
The longitudinal data reveals a lot about users preferences over those of the subject specialists and covers their subject areas and the publishers for the material on demand. It shows how one can build an easy profile that is both sustainable, well-utilized and well integrated into other purchase models. It also reveals book availability issues, surprising title price variations and good data on turnarounds per vendors. Print books are sometimes requested after an eBook has been made available or because an eBook is not or may not ever be an option for a library purchase. New book demand is high when eBooks can’t be shared or when libraries can’t purchase books to share due to budget constraints. This poster session will provide an analysis of the six full years of data to help address these questions and pose others to better understand print book use and availability from a user perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Baker

Stephanie Baker

Library Information Systems Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
GG

George Gottschalk

Acquisitions Operations Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

13 Sunshine ER Tracker
This poster explores the development and functionality of an Electronic Resources Management System (ERMS) developed in-house at the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. Existing commercial ERMS software and services proved to be difficult to populate with cost data, and generally did not allow enough customization to adequately meet the specific needs of our collection managers and acquisitions staff.

The Sunshine ER Tracker ERMS uses Microsoft Access, with a backend-client structure that allows multiple staff to work in the tracker simultaneously. The Tracker backend was populated with cost data and resource metadata from a variety of sources, including spreadsheets, ILS reports, vendor reports, and manually entered notes. Several front-end clients were developed and customized for various staff functions.

The Tracker allows library staff to identify unpaid orders, accurately assign budget allocations, and produce detailed and accurate reports for collection analysis and budget management. It may be customized very easily, and cost after initial development is negligible.

Speakers
avatar for Jay Wiese

Jay Wiese

Library Services Systems Analyst, Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

14 (Re)Discovering Print: Activating and Customizing “Discovery eBooks” to Promote Physical Collections
University of Memphis Libraries employs an integrated discovery service layer with EBSCO Discovery Service powering the Innovative Interfaces, Inc. Encore Duet platform. Recently, despite initial reservations about overwhelming users and librarians with search results, we decided to turn on over 2.7 million EBSCO “discovery ebooks.” These ebooks’ full-text indexing allows users to identify relevant materials beyond, and within, our holdings. This study documents our attempt to harness full-text searching to promote our increasingly under-used print collections by optimizing “discovery ebooks” display using custom resolver links and by understanding the extent to which this collection replicated existing print and electronic holding. Discovery ebook full text searching offers manageable recall, especially for unique or sufficiently qualified proper nouns (names, movements, styles, etc.) with a promising success rate for locating locally-held and useful print materials for which the search terms do not appear in MARC catalog records or other metadata. Our initial study focused on our 22,210 circulating art books (LC Class N1-NX820) in which we discovered a rate of overlap with accessible ebooks at a rate of approximately 10% (N=2,479). Phase two compared a sample (N=2,707) of “discovery ebooks” published between 1947 and 2010 to which we do not have e-access (EDS subject search for “ART”). We discovered title matches against our print holdings at an average rate of 22% (trending lower for new publications and as high as 56% for older publications). After establishing much of the discovery content available within our collection, we customized EDS Full Text Finder link resolvers to point users to our WorldCat Local page to see local holdings or, if necessary, request the item via interlibrary loan. This paper will describe strategies for implementation and promotion, initial results, successes and obstacles, and explore implications for expansion and future work.

Speakers
avatar for James Rodgers

James Rodgers

Acquisitions Librarian, University of Memphis
avatar for Rachel Scott

Rachel Scott

Interim Coordinator, Cataloging, Collection Management, & Systems, University of Memphis


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

16 Innovating New Publication Models for Open Access Archives: A Case Study in Anthropology
Open access content has grown significantly in research and education. 400,000 journal articles were published under open access licenses between 2000 and 2013, with a 30% growth between 2012 and 2013 alone. While open publishing models proliferate in the journal and book space, options have been more limited for archives.

Historically, most archives rely on institutional funding or grants to support digitizing and open publication initiatives. However, funding streams tend to be limited or subject to delays. Additionally, not all content is appropriate for open access. Royalties may be necessary for copyright holders or community repatriation projects. The volume of undigitized primary sources and the varying needs of holding institutions necessitate diversified publication strategies.

There is enormous potential for commercial publishers to support archival content via different models, particularly when publisher and archive share the common goal of broadening access for the global scholarly community. The benefits are mutual. For archives, collaboration can enable more content to move faster along the digitization queue, and for publishers, open content can drive usage.

Models for publishing archival materials have grown, and Alexander Street is responding to the need for diversified models with an open access strategy supported by the traditional collection subscription model. We will present an anthropology initiative undertaken in collaboration with the Vassar College Archive, the London School of Economics Archive, the World Music Archive at Wesleyan University, and others to bring previously unpublished primary sources to a broader scholarly audience. Content was published on different tracks – open access and subscription, in some cases to drive royalties back to the community as repatriation. Taken together, these cases underscore the need for flexible publication channels that enable subscription and open content to co-exist in an integrated way.

Speakers
JM

Jenna Makowski

Senior Editor, Alexander Street
AM

Alec McLane

Music Librarian/Director of the World Music Archives, Wesleyan University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

17 Is the Past 'Really' Prologue? The Effect of a University’s Consolidation on its JSTOR Subscription.
University consolidations do more than just affect students and faculty. Changes to the make-up of a campus and the programs available can have a great influence on needed journal and database subscriptions. This session, presented by the Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian from Augusta University and the Outreach Coordinator from JSTOR, will look at how the consolidation of two universities with different academic missions is reflected in the usage of the six JSTOR collections to which the university subscribes. Using data that was produced in 2012, prior to consolidation, and statistics recently compiled, the presenters will analyze and discuss how subscription usage has changed in the four years since consolidation, factors that could be affecting usage, and the implications for future resources.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Kosturski

Catherine Kosturski

Outreach Coordinator, Southern United States, JSTOR | Artstor | Portico
avatar for Melissa E. Johnson, MLIS, MA

Melissa E. Johnson, MLIS, MA

Electronic Resources & Serials Librarian, Augusta University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

18 Text Mining Virtual Reference through a Collection Management lens: extracting insightful stories and operationalizing data for strategic allocate of resources
If Google and Facebook are the masters of leveraging big data, consider the impact that institutional specific data might have for libraries to uncover causal relationships and predictive behavior from their user population. “Really big data” is an accepted trend in a variety of scholarly practices throughout academia. George Mason University Libraries conducted research using both uniform data and conversation transcripts to text mine three years of virtual reference chats, investigating its applicability for business analytics. Traditional data management systems are not capable of providing this type of real-time intelligence, but real transformative possibilities exist for management to identify misallocation of critical resources, opportunity to better integrate library resources and services, and to harvest authentic user conversations with compelling stories to build collaborative campus-wide relationships.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Polchow

Michelle Polchow

Electronic Resources Librarian, George Mason University
Michelle provides a central role in managing digital resources, including license negotiation; facilitating metadata for multiple systems; and preparing for Alma migration. Co-Chair of Libraries’ Web Tools Usability Group and research partner in ‘Big Data’ text analysis, mining... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

19 Current Practices in Ebook Acquisition
This poster will report on a survey of ebook acquisition practices by selected liberal arts colleges, presented in context of data from major ebook providers and highlights from a review of recent literature including selected blog posts. The result is an outline of how librarians are navigating the current e-book landscape in light of who actually controls the content and the licensing and what options librarians utilize in negotiating the terms of ebook acquisitions.

Speakers
RZ

Raik Zaghloul

Head of Collection Development, Union College


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

20 eBook Licensing: What are the Priorities for Libraries?
eBooks play an important role in providing students on-demand resources for their research and classroom readings. Textbooks are not traditionally purchased by libraries, but could this change with course-use eBooks? Is this a viable option to alleviate the additional cost of supplies to students? To implement this as an option, many factors need to be examined beginning with collection development policies and eBook value statements. My poster provides a visual highlighting the results of the unique research I did on eBook value statements while working on the Mellon-funded Charlotte Initiative.

My search of collection development policies for the grant lead me to find thirteen eBook value statements online. I analyzed each to identify similarities and pinpoint common concerns libraries have with eBooks and what they consider when acquiring them for their collection. My poster identifies the top five priorities found within the statements and a list of all nineteen of the priorities found in a majority of the statements with some discussion. Handouts will include a list of the value statements found with links to them and a list and/or table of all the priorities in order of popularity.

Many of these statements encompass the concerns of a group of academic libraries working together to provide the best in access and discoverability of eBooks in their collections, therefore representing many more than thirteen academic libraries.This information is helpful to publishers and vendors in identifying what the libraries are looking for in eBook products, and useful to libraries and collection development librarians when considering eBook purchasing.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Denzer

Kelly Denzer

Electronic Resources Librarian, Davidson College
Kelly is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Davidson College, Davidson, NC. While working on her MLIS, she worked as a Research Assistant for the Mellon funded project, The Charlotte Initiative: Principles for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks for Academic Libraries, at J. Murrey... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

21 Impact of Joining EAST on our Health Sciences Library
The Tufts University Libraries decided to become one of the founding members of EAST, the Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust, a shared-print initiative. Our particular library's small book collection (about 25,000 volumes) was very heavily impacted by the EAST retention decisions because of our being one of the few health sciences libraries included and our having collection strengths in areas such as dentistry, nutrition, human anatomy, and pathology. Because of our limited shelving space and the need to keep our collection current (our main function is to serve the educational needs of our health sciences students), over the years we have moved much of our material to electronic. Being an EAST member will require us to keep many print materials we would normally have weeded or would be considering to weed. We now have to make exceptions to our collection development policy and change our weeding procedures. This poster will outline some of the challenges we faced and how we have moved forward. An added note: our library decided not to partake in the EAST serials retention project!

Speakers
avatar for Frances Foret

Frances Foret

Head, Collections Management, Hirsh Health Sciences Library, Tufts University
avatar for Siamak  Samiean

Siamak Samiean

Collections Management Assistant, Hirsh Health Sciences Library, Tufts University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

22 Measuring Success: Evaluating Changes Made to Electronic Demand-Driven Acquisitions and Short-Term Loans
In response to shrinking library collections budgets, more and more libraries have turned to electronic demand-driven acquisitions (e-DDA) as an alternative to outright purchase of e-books. At the 2016 Charleston Conference, librarians from the University of Kansas (KU) delivered a presentation, “Boom and Bust: Short-Term Loans Five Years Later,” discussing the development and transformation of the Libraries’ e-DDA program over the previous five years. Through analysis of our recent short-term loan (STL) and e-DDA expenditures, several recommended changes were proposed in order to keep the program cost effective going forward. These recommendations included: changing our preferred e-DDA lending preference to single-user format; adopting APEX, an ebook service through GOBI Library Solutions; and entering into a collaborative e-DDA program with Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries.

This poster will serve as a follow-up to the 2016 session, providing initial assessment of the recommended changes that were made and suggesting whether these changes can be deemed successful in reining in program costs or whether further modifications are needed.

Speakers
avatar for Sherri Brown

Sherri Brown

Literatures & Humanities Librarian, University of Kansas


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

23 Now It’s Legit: Setting up a Formalized Database Subscription Recommendation and Review Process
Like most academic libraries, the Sojourner Truth Library operated for years on a flat database budget while receiving numerous faculty purchase requests for recurring database subscriptions. There was no formal process; we would receive database requests and trial feedback unofficially through e-mail, making it difficult to chronicle requests and collect meaningful information to aid in database purchasing decisions. To help formalize the process and record important decision-making information, a working group of librarians developed an online database recommendation form and database trial feedback survey which we made available to the campus community on the library website. Under this new process, a database purchase recommendation could now lead to a systematic review of existing subscriptions in the requestor’s discipline, analysis of usage statistics, and discussions with faculty, to properly address existing budget constraints. This poster highlights the database subscription recommendation/evaluation process at STL, shares the local forms we created to streamline and formalize the process, and illustrates how the new process performed during the first year of implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Lougen

Colleen Lougen

Electronic Resources Librarian, SUNY New Paltz
Colleen Lougen is the Electronic Resources Librarian at SUNY New Paltz. She is the library liaison to the School of Business, Economics and Mathematics Departments, and the Health and Wellness Center. She has worked in libraries for twenty years. Prior to her current position... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

24 O Brave New Print Collection, that Has Such Data Science Books in It!
The field of data science exists at the intersection of several disciplines, including statistics, social science, information science, computer science, and visualization. This can make collection development for data science challenging, but it's a field that has become increasingly important in industry and academia. Data scientists, and increasingly researchers, academics, and others, work with large amounts of data, complex computation, and data visualization to solve real-world problems. Those working in or studying data science may need to learn new skills and tools to be successful.

North Carolina State University recognizes the importance of this growing field, as shown in the establishment of the Data Science Initiative (DSI); courses taught by faculty in computer science, statistics, advanced analytics, and management; and research conducted at interdisciplinary centers and institutes.

This poster session will describe how librarians from the Collections & Research Strategy department at NCSU Libraries conducted a project to build a niche data science print collection. Information shared in the poster will include the sources that were used to compile an initial list of books, including recommendations from fellow librarians, a curated GOBI notification, websites, suggested reading lists, and course syllabi. Criteria for narrowing this initial list will be provided. The poster will also show an analysis of how this collection overlaps with more established collection areas.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Tebbe

Heidi Tebbe

Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science, NCSU Libraries
Heidi Tebbe is the Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science at North Carolina State University. She manages collections for subjects including engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, and data science.
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Department Head, Research Engagement, North Carolina State University Libraries


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

25 Oh, Wonder! How Many Goodly Creatures Are There Here: Skeletons for Loan in the Library
For students in anatomy and physiology courses, access to models of different systems and structures is an essential key to learning. When you’re dealing with complicated, interconnected, extremely detailed and visually difficult material, having a physical object that you can hold and turn in your hand dramatically reduces the barriers to comprehension and learning. Plastic models of organs as well as of entire skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and nervous systems, have long been key tools in promoting student success. They are also composed of many small pieces, they are relatively expensive, and they are super cool. So they are justifiably kept under close guard, and typically remain locked in the lab that paid for them, accessible only to a lucky credentialed few. But libraries are all about democratization of access, and we also know that sometimes students just want to study at night when the lab where they would normally work is closed and locked up tight. So the NCSU Libraries started small and added a few skeletons to our collection. Now we’ve got a whole conga line and multiple different models.

This poster will discuss the NCSU Libraries experiences lending anatomical models - highlighting our policies, challenges, and successes. The growth of our collection has been managed in close consultation with instructors of human physiology and anatomy courses in response to course-specific needs, and has seen some interesting use patterns, which will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Danica Lewis

Danica Lewis

NCSU Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University Libraries
I'm an NCSU Libraries Fellow based in Collections & Research Strategy and with the initiative "Libraries and Public Science: Supporting the Broader Impacts of Research." My work mainly involves managing the Life Sciences collection and developing programs of library support for NSF... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

26 The Delay with Migrating Print Serials Available Electronically.

Though many libraries have already made the migration from print to electronic journals, the Columbia University Libraries system still has a large print periodical legacy collection. Our materials budget does reflect the move to electronic; as e-journals and databases make up 43% of the current acquisitions budget and print periodicals only make up 4% of the budget. However, this 4% reflects a large number of active titles – 13,000 according to FY 13/14 data.

In this poster session, we will reflect on our case study, which focused on a subset of currently received print periodicals housed in Columbia’s Butler Library. Butler’s Periodical Reading Room receives the largest number of print periodicals (over 1000) across our 17-library system. The presenters investigated titles from one subscription agent with a receiving location of Butler periodicals. We reviewed these titles for electronic availability; if the e-format can be supported by the libraries, and how many of the titles are still only available in print. For those titles that are available electronically, the presenters attempt to answer, “Why are we still getting this in print”?

The goal of this project is to understand the reason print periodicals still need to collected at a large rate at many large University Library systems. We hope that the outcome of the poster informs periodical collection strategies at large institutions with complex print and electronic holdings.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Major

Colleen Major

Head, E-Resources Management, Columbia University
Colleen Major is Head of Electronic Resources Management: Operations & Analysis for Columbia University Libraries, where her work focuses on the electronic resource life cycle.
AS

Adrian Stanley Thomas

Supervisor: Periodical, Microfilm Reading Room & Collection Maintenance, Columbia University
I'm the Supervisor of the Periodical and Microfilm Reading Room at Columbia University. It houses the journal and microfilm collection for hte university. Currently we are evaluating the print collection in relation to our electronic collection. This comprises taking a look at... Read More →


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

27 A Match Made in Heaven: Merging Acquisitions, Licensing, Document Delivery, and ILL into One Big Happy Department!
For the past eighteen months, the Management Team at Old Dominion University Libraries has been working on a major reorganization project that will dramatically change the form and function of the organization. An important component of the restructure is consolidating the Acquisitions & Preservation Services Unit with the ILL & Document Delivery Unit to form a new department called Acquisitions and Resources Fulfillment.

For years, Acquisitions & Preservation Services has been responsible for monographic acquisitions, licensing, and parts of serial and electronic resource acquisitions. In addition, the unit managed all aspects of preservation services including binding, physical processing of materials, environmental control, and disaster preparation and response. At the same time, the ILL unit was responsible for all document delivery and ILL services.

After the merger, the Acquisitions and Resources Fulfillment Department took over all acquisitions work and retained its Document Delivery and ILL functions. However, preservation responsibilities were shifted to a different unit.
Complicating matters was that University Libraries migrated to ALMA just a few months prior to consolidation. In a short period of time, staff members were learning a new ILS, transitioning to a different set of co-workers, and adjusting to a newly created shared work environment.

This presentation will address and answer several questions: What were the reasons for the merger? What were the goals and objectives of the merger? Was the merger effective? What worked? What did not work? What have been the consolidation’s biggest challenges?

Visuals will provide an overview of the initiative, pre and post organizational charts, and takeaways and recommendations for future best practices. Also included will be a list of anticipated future projects for the Acquisitions & Resource Fulfillment Department as well as possible assessment measures for evaluating the success of the merger.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Tench

Rob Tench

Acquisitions & Resources Fulfillment Librarian, Old Dominion University
Rob has been at ODU since 2007.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

28 A Messy Collection, a PMO, and Best Practices: Incorporating Project Management and Principles of Organizational Decision-Making into an Offsite Collection Move
This past year, as part of its masterplan (which includes more student study space), the main Woodruff Library at Emory was involved in organizing, managing, and executing an expedited “messy” onsite collection move (microforms, maps, and government documents) to its Library Service Center. The preparation of materials for the collection move, as well as post-move management and access to said materials, involved numerous units within the library (Access Services, Technical Services, Government Documents, Communications, Subject Librarians) and outside the library (faculty and students, moving vendors, and Georgia Tech, our LSC partner). As with past projects, we utilized some formal project management principles and tools to keep us on task, identify scope, assess risks and known issues, and document milestones. In addition, we found other organizational decision practices and approaches, such as “framing” (Bollman and Gallos) to be valuable in uncovering stakeholders’ perceptions and motivations regarding the value and accessibility of these collections. This presentation will illustrate how we used these tools in light of a collection move characterized by a short timeline and other significant challenges (such as various physical formats, cataloging inconsistencies, and legal obligations). Significant time will be spent on discussing the challenges and lessons learned from the move, particularly as we develop best practices for planned future moves.

Speakers
CP

Christopher Palazzolo

Head of Collections (Woodruff Library), Emory University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

29 Breaking Silos, Changing Mindsets: A Year in the Life of a Copy Cataloging Team
In order to meet the changing needs of our users and to keep pace with changes in technical services, the summer of 2016 provided the perfect opportunity for reorganization of the Resource Description and Discovery Program. To reflect the program’s emphasis on resource discovery, staff formerly in separate receipt and cataloging units were brought together to form the new Monographic Receipt and Discovery Services group (MRDS).
For the new team to succeed, former members of cataloging had to learn about receipt procedures for gifts, firm orders and approval plans while the receipt group was expected to build on their cataloging knowledge in order to increase the amount of incoming material fully processed at receipt. One of our main goals was to reduce handoffs to other teams, making more resources available to users in less time, and freeing up "Original" cataloger time for more detailed projects.
This poster session will show the positive and negative outcomes of combining two groups with similar yet different functions, breaking down siloed behavior and developing a cohesive and productive team.

Speakers
avatar for Monica Crabtree

Monica Crabtree

Supervisor, Resource Description and Discovery Services, University of Notre Dame



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

30 Altruism or Self-Interest? Author Motivations to Publish Open Access
At Utah State University, we were surprised to find that over 200 of our researchers published over 100 Open Access articles in 2016. This is in contrast to the 28 applications to the library’s APC fund in 2016 (80% of which were funded). Compiling this information gave us a relatively easy opportunity to reach out to students and faculty who shared our values but who had not engaged with our services. We then surveyed these researchers to learn why they chose OA, whether out of altruism and equity of access (unique to OA) or out of self-interested concern for speed of peer review and the journal’s readership reach (in common with traditional publishing). Our analysis also reveals trends by academic discipline and tenure status. Because we found very few studies on researchers’ motivations to publish OA, we hope to use these recent data to fill an important gap in the literature. Attendees may also be able to adapt our methods, which included analysis of author data from Scopus and a survey. From these fundamentals and the specific findings of our work, librarians and publishers alike will be able to shape the future of researcher outreach for OA funds, institutional repositories, and other publishing programs.

Speakers
avatar for Dylan Burns

Dylan Burns

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Utah State University
Dylan Burns (MS, Library and Information Science, University of Illinois, 2016) is the Digital Scholarship Librarian at Utah State University. Dylan's expertise is in memory studies, book history, and scholarly publishing.
avatar for Robert Heaton

Robert Heaton

Collection Management Librarian, Utah State University, Merril-Cazier Library
Looking for answers: How will we keep paying for all this stuff? How are we going to archive all this digital stuff? How can we align author incentives, the publishing marketplace, and the future of the scholarly record? When will libraries benefit from well-designed free software... Read More →
avatar for Becky Thoms

Becky Thoms

Head of Digital Initiatives, Utah State University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

31 Moving Scholarly Communications Initiatives from the Periphery to the Core through New Organization Models in the Information Resources Division at Texas A&M University Libraries
The Information Resources division of the Texas A&M University Libraries has explored a decentralized model of institutional repository collection administration and workflows where this work is performed by  multiple collaborating units:  Preservation, Scholarly Communications, and Cataloging & Metadata. This  permits us to leverage the traditional expertise of these units to better handle the growing collections.

Speakers
avatar for Paula Sullenger

Paula Sullenger

Associate Dean for Information Resources Services, Texas A&M University
FOLIO, Technical Services, Collaboration


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

32 ResearchGate vs. the Institutional Repository: Competition or Complement?
The popularity of ResearchGate and Academia.edu indicates that scholars want to share their work, yet to librarians tasked with implementing an Open Access policy, it can appear as though faculty are willing to invest more time uploading articles to academic social networks—often in violation of publisher policies—than in submitting articles for deposit in the institutional repository. In this session, we will present the results of a population study and survey that revealed the practices, attitudes, and motivations of faculty at the University of Rhode Island around depositing their work in ResearchGate and complying with our permissions-based Open Access Policy. While the majority of URI faculty do not use either service, we were surprised to find that faculty who share articles through ResearchGate are more likely to comply with the Open Access Policy, not less, suggesting that librarians should not view academic social networks as a threat. We discovered that a significant barrier to compliance with the OA Policy is the fact that it targets the author’s accepted manuscript version of articles and that misunderstandings about copyright leave authors confused about options for legally sharing their work. What does it mean for the Open Access movement that only a minority of faculty choose to openly share their work and comply with Open Access policies? Does the strong preference by authors for sharing final publisher PDFs provide support for calls to hasten the transition to a Gold OA publishing system? We hope attendees will engage with us in a discussion of these issues.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Lovett

Julia Lovett

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Rhode Island
Julia Lovett is currently Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Rhode Island, where she manages digital projects and scholarly communications initiatives, including the URI Open Access Policy. Prior to URI, she served as Special Projects Librarian at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Andrée Rathemacher

Andrée Rathemacher

Head, Acquisitions, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. An advocate of open access and... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

33 Nothing is Linear about Open Access Initiatives: Promoting OA at a New Research Institution
Every campus appears to be “in the know” when it comes to open access, yet many of us “in the trenches” at our university libraries know that not to be the case. Often what is closer to reality is that there are many pockets of disparate knowledge on campus that need to be harnessed and reconciled in order to truly develop a program that benefits the whole. This poster will describe Rowan University’s current Open Access (OA) and Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives that conference attendees may use as templates for programs at their institutions.

Rowan University’s recent designation as a Carnegie Classification R3 research institution has been a catalyst to propel the university libraries’ many robust, if burgeoning, OA/OER initiatives. The Campbell Library at Rowan University has been actively working to promote open access in a variety of ways, actively working with both deans and university administration to promote OA projects. We will describe the many efforts that have been established through collaborations and partnerships that have been new for our community. Additionally, we will illustrate some of our outreach events as a way to highlight the topic campus wide.

Initiatives to be highlighted include recruiting faculty and student publications for Rowan University’s institutional repository, the addition of OA enhancements to the library website’s discovery services, addition of OA and OER content to the libraries’ website, ongoing education and outreach efforts for faculty and students, including access to resources such as the SPARC website, Open Textbook Network, Open Science Framework, and instruction on the difference between good and bad open access journals.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Rowan University
avatar for Jennifer Matthews

Jennifer Matthews

Collection Strategy Librarian, Rowan University



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

34 When CORAL Moves to Alma: Reshaping E-Resource Management Workflows and Concepts
UConn Library migrated its integrated library system from Voyager to Alma in 2015. In 2017, we moved eresources management (ERM) and licensing operations from CORAL to Alma. CORAL is an open source, locally hosted electronic resource management system (ERMS), while Alma is a proprietary cloud-hosted next-gen system from Ex Libris that centralizes library financial, acquisitions, circulation, reserves, and other operations in one system. How did this switch from CORAL to Alma impact us? On one level, this presentation compares and contrasts the functionalities of the two systems and how migrating from one to the other impacted library workflows and collaborations. Beyond product comparison, this presentation will examine how Alma is reconceptualizing and reshaping eresources management in relation to other functional roles, people, and values. This poster is relevant to librarians working in metadata, acquisitions, licensing, design, and any other role impacted by library systems.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Rodriguez

Michael Rodriguez

Licensing & Acquisitions Librarian, University of Connecticut



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

35 Preliminary Findings of an ILS Migration that Will Be Just Past the Mid-way Point of Pre-Migration
Preserving the integrity and improving the quality of the catalog data as it is extracted from ExLibris’ Aleph, broken down, moved to California, and re-built in Innovative Sierra on the west coast has been a concentration of our department’s and all the Florida public colleges’ and universities’ library work this year. I was excited to learn ExLibris’ ILS and am working to maintain and improve the functionality of our catalog’s data as it’s moved over to Sierra. Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative’s revised, projected date for “go-live” is July 2018, and two in my department are have working group assignments.

Discussing the hierarchical structure to implement a library catalog and discovery migration in a statewide, shared, single bibliographic record environment, or how the migration works could each take up a presentation. The shared working groups’ efforts, structure, tasks, assignments, troubles, data review, and data review techniques, training, accomplishments, efficiencies, schedules, investments, minutes, software (Wiki, Drop Box, Google tools, Canvas, Blackboard) is the focus of my presentation. And locally, how we’re managing and what we’re anticipating. Our department still added 2,800 new print/e-titles (nothing packaged), embarked on a textbook purchasing program, attended to collection development and maintenance, and retrospectively developed the collection to support new certificates and master's level programs.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Dunleavy

Christine Dunleavy

Library Operations Manager, University of South Florida Libraries
The University of South Florida St Petersburg's enrollment is growing at a projected rate of 4% annually, over the coming few years. New degree programs are being added. I’m interested in the hierarchical structure of implementing a library catalog and discovery migration in a statewide... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

36 Past and Future Collections: Making the Connection with Makerspaces
Traditionally, academic library services have focused on connecting print collections to researchers. As academic libraries shift to providing services and support for the exploration, learning, knowledge sharing, and creation of innovative research projects and tools, collection development responsibilities of the past have morphed to include acquisition of technologies, digital objects, data, experts, and spaces. Librarians face the challenge of curating and supporting these creative endeavors.

These resources lack a common disciplinary definition, but they share values with making and makerspaces, supporting discovery, experimentation, and exploration. In order to consolidate these collections of resources, the role of the librarian, then, becomes that of shopkeeper, peddling a diverse list of goods and services without discrimination.

The concept of makerspaces is not new, but as these spaces continue to appear in academic libraries, we must question the types of support we provide. In concert with bringing the physical makerspace to fruition in our library, we have worked to develop a digital portal that will connect orphaned collections with the physical spaces devoted to making; this supplements traditional collection development practices while breaking down barriers to cross-disciplinary work. This virtual hub not only connects makers with campus-wide spaces for making and collections of all kinds that support and inspire making, but also publishes the physical in the digital world, bringing concepts and projects to those who would otherwise have little or no chance to interact with making.

This poster highlights the role of libraries in supporting makerspaces and showcases a collaborative model that enables cross-pollination of ideas, activities, and resources that support creative inquiry outside of the classroom. Attendees will exchange ideas about makerspaces, virtual communities, and related collection development practices, and will learn about creating a librarian-curated portal that showcases the application of a maker mindset and the integration of emerging technologies.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Caruso

Beth Caruso

Technology Services Coordinator, Atkins Library, UNC Charlotte
Beth Caruso is from New Orleans, but currently lives in Charlotte, NC. After she graduated with her MA in English, she taught writing at the college level and was the Associate Director of the UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center. She graduated with her MLIS in May of 2017, and... Read More →
SK

Somaly KimWu

Head of Library Technology & Innovation, Atkins Library, UNC Charlotte



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

37 Taming the Social Media Beast
Social media in libraries is an elusive beast. Once you think you have it conquered and know how and where to communicate with patrons, things shift and your information is quickly out of date. In academic libraries, students jump from platform to platform and it’s hard to know the best place to reach them and with what content. Librarians at Purdue University ran a social media survey in four libraries during the Spring 2017 semester: the undergraduate library, humanities, social science and education library, business library, and engineering library. We wanted to know what platforms the students are currently using, what they are using them for, where they want to see the libraries, and what content they want from us on each platform type. This information will be used to inform the Purdue Libraries social media content and policy for the upcoming 2017-2018 school year. This poster will show survey methodology and results, which can be used by other libraries to run their own study, or learn from our results.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Howard

Heather Howard

Business Information Specialist, Purdue University
avatar for Sarah Huber

Sarah Huber

Engineering Technology Information Specialist, Purdue University


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

39 Who's Using This Database? Leaving IP Authentication Behind
For many years, IP authentication has been the de facto standard for electronic resource access. At Dahlgren Memorial Library, the graduate health and life sciences research library at Georgetown University Medical Center, we made a decision to transition resources away from IP authenticated access to username/password based access tied to a patron’s network identity. We envisioned a number of potential benefits to this move - additional financial stewardship, more secure identity management, granular usage and collection management data and additional branding opportunities. The pilot project for a username based authentication has been possible due to the library’s implementation of the OpenAthens authentication system from Eduserv. This poster will discuss the transition, including the rationale behind the move , the implementation process and the results one year into the pilot.

Speakers
BH

Brandon Hudson

Executive Assistant, Georgetown University Medical Center
LV

Linda Van Keuren

Associate Director for Resources and Access Management, Georgetown University Medical Center
Linda Van Keuren, MLS, AHIP is the Associate Director for Resources and Access Management at Dahlgren Memorial Library, Georgetown University Medical Center.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

40 A Deep Dive for Discovery: Using Google Analytics’ User Explorer Tool for a Detailed Look into our Users and EBSCO Discovery Service
Google Analytics is a widely used tool for library websites and applications, providing an overview of the number of users who visit a site, the number of sessions that take place, and which channels users take to end up there. In the spring of 2016, Google Analytics released the User Explorer tool, which looks at the individual user behavior, as opposed to the entire user group.

With User Explorer data, this poster will dive deeper into Google Analytics and explore the searches users execute, the limiters users select, and additional session information. The data gathered and analyzed helped the Discovery Services Librarian map the user journey through EDS, and helped inform interface improvements to complement the user journey.

Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

41 A Prologue to Planning: Assessing Use of an Academic Library Graduate Student Study Room
Properly allocated physical space has a huge impact on the success of an academic library (Spencer, 2017). However, creating more space in the library can be difficult for some institutions and this is why space assessment studies are a valuable tool when making decisions about space allocation. One group underrepresented at universities are graduate students. Although graduate students add value and contribute success to their universities through teaching and research (Golde, 2005), most library spaces and information commons are built around undergraduates (Gibbs, et al., 2012), possibly because their “multiple roles that go well beyond being a mere student” (Rempel et. al., 2011) make them a challenging group to serve in a comprehensive manner. Compounding this challenge, most student services research focuses on undergraduates. Libraries have attempted to meet the needs of graduate students by providing services and dedicated space, but further work needs to be done in order to meet graduate students’ diverse needs.

This poster will present findings from a project to study use of a library room dedicated to graduate students at a large public land grant institution. The administrative assumption was that the room was being underused because the graduate students’ needs were not being met. To explore this assumption, the researchers employed unobtrusive observations and brief interviews. The researchers gathered valuable information on the how graduate students were using the room, how frequently, and any changes users would like to see to the room and graduate student services more generally. In order to serve graduate students, libraries must find ways to support them and this study shows that the study site university is making this group a priority.

Additional contributors include: Kristina Clement (kcleme10@vols.utk.edu), Lauren Johnson (ljohn114@vols.utk.edu), Dr. Rachel Fleming-May (rf-m@utk.edu), Assessment Librarian Regina Mays (rmays@utk.edu), Associate Dean Teresa Walker (tbwalker@utk.edu). Sources cited in abstract: Gibbs, D., Boettcher, J., Hollingsworth, J., & Slania, H. (2012). Assessing the Research Needs of Graduate Students at Georgetown University. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 38(5), 268–276. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2012.07.002
Golde, C. M. (2005). The Role of the Department and Discipline in Doctoral Student Attrition: Lessons from Four Departments. Journal of Higher Education, 76(6; 6), 669–700. Rempel, Hussong-Christian, & Mellinger. (2011). Graduate Student Space and Service Needs: A Recommendation for a Cross-campus Solution. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(6), 480-487. Spencer, M. E., & Watstein, S. B. (2017). Academic Library Spaces: Advancing Student Success and Helping Students Thrive. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 17(2), 389–402. https://doi.org/10.1353/pla.2017.0024

Speakers
avatar for Alexa Carter

Alexa Carter

Graduate Research Assistant-Experience Assessment (UX-A), University of Tennessee - Knoxville
Alexa is an ALA Spectrum Scholar, ARL Diversity Scholar, and UTK Tyson Diversity Fellow. Her research interests include scientific information literacy, user experience and assessment, data management, and STEM outreach. She looks forward to pursuing a position in an academic or research... Read More →
avatar for Brianne Dosch

Brianne Dosch

Research Assistant - Recent Graduate, University of Tennessee
JK

Jordan Kaufman

Graduate Research Assistant-Experience Assessment (UX-A), University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

42 Library Space: The Final Frontier or the Next Generation? Assessing Active Learning Space in the Academic Library
Space—is it truly the final frontier? For academic libraries, the answer may very well be “yes.” A library’s physical space is one of its most valuable and most restricted resources. As academic libraries try to continually expand their service offerings, difficult decisions about space allocation must be made. This poster will report on findings from a study of a library space devoted to a new and innovative purpose: a new space with treadmill desks, standing desks, cycling desks, and balance chairs to encourage and facilitate active learning through physical movement. The research team, located at a large, public, land grant institution, conducted a study using observation and short surveys to gather information about use trends of the area as well as user perceptions of the active learning space.
Increasing physical space can be impossible for some institutions; for those institutions that can afford physical expansion, the monetary costs and level of inconvenience renovation entails can be high enough that the risk outweighs the reward. Conducting space assessment studies allows library administrators to understand how and why a space is being used, so that space allocations can be decided based on users’ needs. Improvements made to the space contribute to student, faculty, and staff success and the overall value of the library. This poster details a study about the usage of the active learning equipment and the benefits gained from allocating space in this way. Poster session attendees will learn about what works in this space, what doesn’t work, and how active learning space in an academic library can influence and have an impact on student success. In doing so, we explore possibly strange and new perspectives and boldly go where few librarians have gone before... Additional presenters/authors: Brianne Dosch, Jordan Kauffman, Rachel Fleming-May, Regina Mays, Teresa Walker.

Speakers
SC

Sian Carr

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Tennessee Knoxville
avatar for Alexa Carter

Alexa Carter

Graduate Research Assistant-Experience Assessment (UX-A), University of Tennessee - Knoxville
Alexa is an ALA Spectrum Scholar, ARL Diversity Scholar, and UTK Tyson Diversity Fellow. Her research interests include scientific information literacy, user experience and assessment, data management, and STEM outreach. She looks forward to pursuing a position in an academic or research... Read More →
avatar for Kristina Clement

Kristina Clement

MLIS Graduate Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
avatar for Lauren Johnson

Lauren Johnson

User Experience Librarian, Nevada State College


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

First Aid for Student Costs: Helping Nursing Faculty Reduce Textbook Purchase Requirements
In 2017 several nursing instructors at the University of North Carolina of Greensboro received mini-grants. This funding was provided for course redesign to reduce textbook purchase requirements. This poster describes liaison librarian support for the first stages of course redesign. Support included reviewing needs, searching for existing e-resources, discussing copyright and licensing issues, and more. This information should be interesting to any health sciences librarian and useful for librarians promoting low cost textbook alternatives.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Leininger

Lea Leininger

Health Sciences Librarian, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
My liaison areas include the UNCG School of Nursing, the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department, the Nutrition Department, and the Genetic Counseling Program. I'm interested in resources and instruction for nursing and allied health. I earned my MLIS from the University... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Free Textbooks! Open Educational Resources at Xavier University of Louisiana
This poster illustrates a timeline of Xavier University of Louisiana Library’s movement to promote Open Educational Resources (OERs) on its campus. Xavier University of Louisiana is both Catholic and historically Black. Its ultimate purpose is to contribute to the promotion of a more just and humane society by preparing its students to assume roles of leadership and service in a global society.
For years librarians at Xavier University have been approached by students looking for the various textbooks they need for their courses. In discussions with student workers, librarians learned how students often borrow texts from professors, share textbooks with other students, scan chapters of a book before returning it to the bookstore, photograph pertinent pages of a text while in the bookstore, or elect not to purchase the book at all and risk receiving a low grade. Like many students in the United States, Xavier students find the cost of textbooks to be overwhelming.
Last year Xavier’s Library was invited to partner with LOUIS, The Louisiana Network, to expose teaching faculty members of various disciplines to OERs they may consider using in their classrooms. These OERs were marketed on campus in a deliberate way beginning with the Provost of the university, continuing with the director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and concluding with a presentation to teaching faculty members. This initiative worked to get faculty interested in using OERs for their courses and in some cases interested in writing OERs.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Hampton

Nancy Hampton

Head of Collection Resources, Xavier University of Louisiana
Nancy Hampton is currently responsible for the planning, implementation, and management of all continuing resources and manuscripts in both print and electronic formats.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Handing over the Keys to the Patron: Where Will PDA Drive Us?
In this paper, I will seek to raise critical questions about the adoption of PDA programs in academic libraries. In an era of shrinking budgets, PDA would seem to offer an efficient alternative to traditional collection development since it insures that the books purchased are the books used. In library science terms, PDA does away with the dilemma embodied by Trueswell’s well-known 80/20 rule, according to which a fraction of a library’s holdings account for the majority of its checkouts. As it has already become a commonplace to say in discussions of library policy, PDA supplants “just in case” with “just in time” purchasing. I will probe the assumptions embedded in the rhetoric of “just in time” and “just in case,” and ask whether these pithy formulae distort discussion of the two different approaches to collection-building from the start. I will explore the nuances of the conception of efficiency used to compare traditional collection development with PDA. If the 80/20 rule represents a problem for collection building – and as a preliminary it is crucial to question against what backdrop of expectation supported by what implicit statistical model it has been so understood -- does PDA solve it? Most importantly, what might be some of the practical outcomes of the implementation of a PDA program in academic libraries? To begin to get a handle of this last question, I will report on the examination of results of a PDA pilot program undertaken by the University of Oregon in concert with the Orbis-Cascade Alliance, offering a subject specialist’s insights into the books in the humanities acquired by the library through the program. Ultimately, I hope to suggest the competing ideas about the nature of libraries that underlie both PDA and the established approach to collecting from which it so radically departs.

Speakers
JS

Jeff Staiger

Humanities Librarian, University of Oregon


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

JR5s, University of Chicago Press Journals, and the JSTOR Bump
Despite its limitations, JSTOR is a favorite of students. Although it is not featured prominently in our information literacy sessions, JSTOR is consistently among our most accessed databases. This gives journals on JSTOR a significant platform advantage, but previously it had been difficult to measure. An accurate “apples to apples” comparison of JSTOR and other full text sources was impossible because coverage dates for journals vary by platform and the JR1 combines full text usage from all years of publication.
With the widespread adoption of the JR5, we have a new tool that can be used to benchmark usage across platforms with overlapping journal coverage. The JR5 reports the number of full text downloads for each year of publication. This allows us to compare usage for the same content (title/year of publication) across platforms.
The decision by University of Chicago Press to discontinue its participation in JSTOR’s Current Scholarship program in 2016 provides an excellent case study that demonstrates the importance of measuring the magnitude of platform advantage. This poster will present the results of a study of reported usage data from University of Chicago Press journals from both the JSTOR and University of Chicago Press platforms. Graphs will demonstrate the discrepancies in use between the same content on the different platforms and illustrate the changes in use as a result of the platform change for current scholarship content. Implications for cost per download and overall value of journal subscriptions will be discussed.
I hope viewers of the poster will reflect upon the role that platform plays in providing information to researchers and value to libraries. I also hope that the presented data will lead to broader discussions about how publishing and purchasing decisions have implications that may not be initially understood if access issues are not fully considered.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew J Jabaily

Matthew J Jabaily

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Kraemer Family Library, University of Colorado Colorado Springs


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Learning from the Past, Building a Better Future: Employee Motivation and Patron Satisfaction
Historically, academic libraries have struggled with providing consistent customer service. How might understanding the underlying motivations of staff – including student workers – impact the quality of customer service an academic library is able to provide? This poster presents a theoretical model that explores whether alternative customer service models -- where more time, energy, and passion is invested in the staff who interact with the public on a daily basis -- would result in academic libraries seeing a larger return on investment in terms of student success, faculty support, brand loyalty and advocacy, and overall user satisfaction. We will review the current research on consistent customer service in academic libraries and describe alternative methods of customer service training used by businesses and other non-library organizations to explore the principles behind employee motivation techniques. We also plan to show how this kind of training could be implemented in libraries to improve employee support and patron satisfaction.
We plan to additionally present a model for research that would identify gaps (if any) between what employees identify as motivators and what their supervisors perceive as motivators, to be able to offer recommendations to better train both employees and supervisors to provide higher quality customer service.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Clement

Kristina Clement

MLIS Graduate Student, University of Tennessee Knoxville
avatar for Brianne Dosch

Brianne Dosch

Research Assistant - Recent Graduate, University of Tennessee


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Page Not Found: creating a troubleshooting workflow for your library
Nothing can ruin a patron’s library experience more than a resource that refuses to open or download. As a greater number of library resources move online librarians are faced with the constant task of keeping them accessible. Websites are taking advantage of this by offering library users access to articles illegally made available outside of paywalls. Establishing a proactive and effective troubleshooting workflow for your library is key to encouraging continued use of databases and resources. Key areas include testing, working with vendors, and convenient reporting avenues. With a little planning and teamwork your library can bring in users and retain them through consistent and easy to use online resources.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Becker

Rachel Becker

Copyright and Emerging Technologies Librarian, Madison Area Technical College
Librarian currently at Madison Area Technical College working with reference, instruction, technology, and outreach. Also skills in copyright, fair use, licensing, electronic resources management, and legal issues.



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Showcasing Ebook Platform Features
Faculty and students are making increasingly nuanced use of eBook collections, but the variance in eBook attributes between publishers and platforms necessitates much more specific information about the various features of eBooks in order for patrons to make informed decisions. Librarians have been increasingly tasked to field questions ranging from the stability of links in syllabi, the number of simultaneous users, download formats, software requirements, and support for assistive technology. These new information needs have led the NCSU Libraries to develop a public facing web tool designed to help make the features, permissions, and use of our collection a little more transparent and accessible to patrons and library staff.

The virtual poster will demonstrate the functionality of this tool, a web-based dropdown menu of providers that highlights the different capacities of eBooks in our collection and provides answers to the most common patron questions about the use of the collection that we field. All of the underlying information can also be downloaded to provide a more holistic summary view of the composition and characteristics of the collection, for use by library staff needing an overview of the general characteristics of our eBook collection as a whole. We will accompany the demo of the tool with text describing our design process and considerations.

Speakers
avatar for Shaun Bennett

Shaun Bennett

University Library Technician, North Carolina State University
Demand-driven acquisition, usage statistics, digital humanities, 3D printing, large-scale visualization.
avatar for Danica Lewis

Danica Lewis

NCSU Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University Libraries
I'm an NCSU Libraries Fellow based in Collections & Research Strategy and with the initiative "Libraries and Public Science: Supporting the Broader Impacts of Research." My work mainly involves managing the Life Sciences collection and developing programs of library support for NSF... Read More →
avatar for xiaoyan song

xiaoyan song

E-Resource Librarian, North Carolina State University
Xiaoyan Song is the Electronic Resource Librarian (ERL) at the Monograph Unit in the Acquisition and Discovery (A&D) department at NCSU Libraries. She mingles with all aspects of ebooks including acquisition, license negotiation, activation, ebook troubleshooting, and workflow mapping... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Silo Busting: Adding Value through Resource Sharing Diversification
Resource sharing offers opportunities to add value to the patron experience and library collection through systematic integration with acquisitions and collection development operations. Due to the inherent complexity of resource sharing and collection development, there is no universal strategy that will work for every institution. However, a comparative approach based on local case studies and best practices can help others recognize and pursue silo busting opportunities at their own organizations. This poster and its accompanying shotgun presentation explore the various strategies and processes being employed at three academic institutions with unique demands and needs. Despite their distinctive properties, these scenarios reflect an underlying commitment to collaboration, innovation, and exemplary service.

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Lewter

Brandon Lewter

Interlibrary Loan Coordinator and Research and Instruction Librarian II, The College of Charleston
Interlibrary loan, reference, and collection development
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Electronic Resources Librarian, Yale University
Electronic Resources Librarian at Yale's Lillian Goldman Law Library. Associate Editor of The Serials Librarian.
avatar for Renna Redd

Renna Redd

Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Clemson University
Renna Tuten Redd has served as the Interlibrary Loan Librarian at Clemson University since 2015. Her duties involve overseeing all resource sharing and document delivery services as well as off-site storage management. Her other current library projects involve participating in the... Read More →



Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

The Two Second (Data-Driven) Renewal: Automating Renewal Decisions Using Excel
There are some experiences universally shared by practically every library, regardless of type or size. Two of these experiences are never having enough money to buy everything we want to buy and never having enough time to do everything we want to do. Unfortunately, balancing these two things can be tricky. Because of the money shortage, we should review each subscription renewal carefully to make sure that the purchase is still the best purchase for the library. However, because of the time shortage, we often don’t have time to individually review hundreds (or thousands) of renewals each year.

This poster will outline how one library automated its approximately 2,500 subscription renewals to the point that a classified staff member can simply enter the price into a spreadsheet and get an immediate decision if s/he should renew a title or if the title needs to be escalated directly to a subject selector for review because of a significant increase in cost or high cost per use. Some of the steps that will be discussed include establishing renewal criteria, compiling all of the data into a spreadsheet, applying formulas and conditional formatting to configure the spreadsheet to offer immediate feedback, and utilizing an email template for escalated decisions. By utilizing the renewal spreadsheet, the serials department at the University of Arkansas Libraries has saved a substantial amount of time—especially at the professional staff level. Additionally, as a data-driven decision was made for each title, the library has saved money that could be reallocated to other resources.

Speakers
avatar for Mandi Smith

Mandi Smith

Serials Librarian, University of Arkansas Libraries
Mandi Smith is the Serials Librarian at the University of Arkansas. Her research interests include electronic resources, assessment/evaluation, workflows, and improved efficiencies in academic libraries--especially in technical services.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:00pm

Annual Charleston Conference Reception
Sponsored by Elsevier

Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium. Be entertained by an intimate look at many of South Carolina’s native animals and plants as your journey through the Aquarium takes you from the mountains to the sea. You’ll encounter surprises around every corner and an experience straight from the island of Madagascar is closer than you imagine. The Shark Shallows 20,000 gallon touch tank exhibit will also be open to attendees.

Delicious lowcountry specialties, as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served. Beer, wine, and soft drinks provided at the bar. Live musical entertainment by The Soulfeathers. We'll also have a photo booth, sponsored by Duke University Press, to take souvenir photos with fun props. 

Meet the Authors - We'll have several authors on site from both the Charleston Insights series as well as the brand new Charleston Briefings series. Come by to say hello and learn more about their books!

Shuttle transportation will be provided. Pick up one of the shuttles at any conference location and let the driver know you wish to attend the reception at the aquarium. We can't wait to see you there!

Sponsors
avatar for ELSEVIER

ELSEVIER

Elsevier is a global information analytics company that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity.


Wednesday November 8, 2017 7:00pm - 9:00pm
South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Thursday, November 9
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/6, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/9, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/10: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Thursday November 9, 2017 7:00am - 6:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:30am

Sunrise Session: Libraries as Self-Publishers
The presentation discusses the challenges and motivations of library publishing as institutional self-publishing from an overall market perspective. The discussion will focus on three main issues.

Firstly, the role of academic libraries has dramatically changed towards a provider of access to scholarly information. We argue that full-fledged publication services can be an integral part of a libraries service portfolio which centered about the scholarly communication needs of patrons.

Secondly, publishing operations of different form require a distinctive skill set not necessarily available in libraries. As for the editorial layer of publishing, training will be needed. However, as for the operational side of publishing, we argue that digital transformation has facilitated a disintegration of the publishing process; offering an expanding landscape of plug&play publishing services which allow non-commercial actors to sustain professional publishing operations.

Thirdly, many librarians voice concerns over poor quality when it comes to self-publishing. We argue that in academic publishing quality may better be regarded as a continuum rather than a binary. Different library publishing endeavors have different (institutional) stakeholders and need to meet varying expectations. Hence, different standards for what is considered quality publishing output may be appropriate. For example, commercial publishers are increasingly focus on must-have reference works with global audience, libraries may welcome quality titles with more regional taste.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Schnoor

Oliver Schnoor

Sales Manager, Books on Demand / PubliQation


Thursday November 9, 2017 7:30am - 8:15am
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors
avatar for ATG Media

ATG Media

ATG Media is the umbrella group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain, and a new series titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals." ATG Media is a wholly owned subsidiary of Against the Grain, LLC.


Thursday November 9, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:30am

Opening Remarks and Announcements
Thursday November 9, 2017 8:30am - 8:35am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:35am

Bringing Your Physical Books to Digital Learners via the Open Library Project
Today, for many learners, if a book isn’t digital, it’s as if it doesn’t exist. As publishers, librarians and vendors, we know there’s almost a century of knowledge still living only on the printed page, missing from our digital shelves.
How can we all work together to preserve and provide access to some of the 20th century’s best thinkers?  How do we unleash the full value of library collections by transforming hard copies into lendable ebooks?
The Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle will describe the new Open Libraries project -- a community project bringing millions of books online, through purchase or digitization, while honoring the rights of creators and expanding their online reach. By digitizing millions of books, we can turn the majority of library collections digital by 2020.
The opportunity is huge: learn how publishers, libraries and technologists are working together to bring all libraries digital and create an enduring asset for future generations, ensuring more equal access to knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Special Advisor, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle

Founder, Internet Archive
A passionate advocate for public Internet access and a successful entrepreneur, Brewster Kahle has spent his career intent on a singular focus: providing Universal Access to All Knowledge. He is the founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries... Read More →


Thursday November 9, 2017 8:35am - 9:15am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:15am

ABC-Clio Vicky Speck Leadership Award
Vicky Speck ABC-CLIO Leadership Award is awarded every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference’s mission. The award has been granted annually since 2006 – Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), Ramune Kubilius (2012), Audrey Powers (2013), Leah Hinds (2014), Tony Horava (2015), and Chuck Hamaker (2016).

Thursday November 9, 2017 9:15am - 9:20am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:20am

All the Robots are Coming! The Promise and the Peril of AI
Hardly a day passes when artificial intelligence is put forth either as a panacea for information overload, or a harbinger for the end of human society. Whether the topic is big data, scholarly communications, or researcher workflows, AI increasingly impacts our daily lives, and AI software tools are becoming readily available. What is AI? How will it affect scholarly production and knowledge discovery? Learn about the pros and cons of using automation to replace routine and repetitive research activity from experiment through analysis, and how AI could replace or augment cumbersome peer review processes. Discuss examples of how AI could augment our ability to produce new knowledge, and make connections between people and insights that were previously impossible.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, Hypothes.is
 

Speakers
avatar for Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley

Director of Online Strategy, UC Davis
Peter Brantley (@naypinya) is Director of Online Strategy for the University of California Davis Library. Previously, I was the Director of Digital Development at New York Public Library, and the Director of Scholarly Communication at the open source not-for-profit, Hypothes.is. Currently... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Caley

Elizabeth Caley

Chief of Staff, Meta, Chan Zuckerberg
Elizabeth Caley is a Director at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, a new kind of philanthropic organization that works to advance human potential and promote equal opportunity. Elizabeth co-leads Meta, part of Chan Zuckerberg dedicated to accelerating discoveries by connecting the... Read More →
IM

Ian Mulvany

Head of Product Innovation, SAGE
avatar for Ruth Pickering

Ruth Pickering

Co-founder & Chief Strategy Officer, Yewno, Inc
Ruth has worked for both blue-chip corporations and startups and has extensive experience across product development, program management and strategy. With experience as a managing director of large organizations, Pickering has managed both strategic planning and execution of multiple... Read More →



Thursday November 9, 2017 9:20am - 10:00am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:00am

Refreshment Break
Sponsors
avatar for Canadian Science Publishing

Canadian Science Publishing

Canadian Science Publishing (CSP) is an independent, not-for-profit scholarly publisher dedicated to serving the needs of researchers and their communities.


Thursday November 9, 2017 10:00am - 10:20am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

A Simpler Path to Public Access Compliance
A recent study conducted by Vanderbilt University showed that research staff in academic institutions spend up to 15% of their time on regulatory compliance. The requirements associated with funded research are varied and complex, and becoming ever more so. With the responsibility for compliance with funder mandates passed along to the researcher, the cost, and the liability for non-compliance, is shouldered by the institutions.

In the U.S. alone, there are now 19 OSTP-approved public access plans in place among federal departments and agencies. In addition, many agencies also require that all new research projects have data management plans in place describing the data to be collected and plans for its long-term preservation and access. Libraries have stepped into the fray as long-time experts in handling curation and access and can now play an important role in the research ecosystem.

There is a lot that can be done to help lessen the burden of compliance, expose necessary metadata and monitor the status of published articles. CHORUS has developed tools to identify, ingest and monitor funded article metadata, and is partnering with libraries and publishers to ensure that articles are publicly accessible when required.

In this session, we will showcase examples of how publishers, funders and institutions are working together to develop efficient solutions to reducing the cost of compliance, and explore the data gap uncovered in these pilot efforts.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hollandsworth

Economics, Finance & PRTM Librarian, Learning Commons Coordinator, Clemson University
Bobby Hollandsworth is the Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Business Reference Librarian, and RefWorks Administrator at RM Cooper Library on the campus of Clemson University. He serves as the library liaison to the departments of Economics, Finance, Agribusiness, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Crotty

David Crotty

Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
David Crotty is the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. He oversees journal policy and contributes to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drives technological innovation, serves as an information officer, and manages a suite of research society-owned... Read More →
avatar for Jack Maness

Jack Maness

Associate Dean, University of Denver Libraries
I joined DU in 2017 as Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication & Collections Services. I oversee collection development and acquisitions, cataloging and metadata, our institutional repository, digitization, IT, and special collections & archives efforts. Previous to joining DU... Read More →
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
Howard is the driving force behind CHOR Inc. and its first service, CHORUS. Over the past two decades, he played a key role in developing innovative technology solutions that have transformed scholarly communications. He co-founded and chaired the not-for-profit ORCID – Open Researcher... Read More →
avatar for Judith Russell

Judith Russell

Dean of Libraries, University of Florida



Thursday November 9, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

Open Access Monographs: Promise or Bust?
The publication of Open Access monographs in the humanities and social sciences has exploded in the past two years. Are OA publications being found and used? What can we learn from the usage data? We’ll discuss the results of a survey and usage analysis across four university presses, revealing striking insights on reader behavior and the usage and impact of Open Access titles. We’ll also share best practices for marketing, discoverability, and usage reporting for Open Access titles, and discuss how these works can be integrated into libraries’ collection development policies and acquisition workflows. Those who advocate for OA will be bolstered, challenged, and perplexed by the findings.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, Hypothes.is
 

Speakers
avatar for Erich van Rijn

Erich van Rijn

Director of Journals & Open Access, University of California Press
avatar for Frank Smith

Frank Smith

Director, Books at JSTOR, ITHAKA
avatar for Dean Smith

Dean Smith

Director, Cornell University Press
Dean Smith is Director of Cornell University Press -- the first university press in the US -- and oversees a program that publishes 130 new books a year and features 3,000 titles in print. His newest author is John Cleese. His career in publishing spans 30 years and includes experience... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director, Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library



Thursday November 9, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

Unlocking Your Classic Books for New Generations
In 1973, MIT Press re-issued a work by Frederick Law Olmsted telling the story of his plans for New York City’s Central Park. If you search online for this gem today, you’ll find it sells for about $500 in the used book market. Now, MIT Press is partnering with the Internet Archive to digitize its deep backlist books, enabling a new generation to read Olmsted’s classic online for the first time. With support from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Peter Baldwin and Lisbet Rausing, this partnership represents an important advance in providing free, long-term public access to knowledge. MIT Press Director, Amy Brand, and Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle and Wendy Hanamura will talk about the opportunities for libraries in this new model.

Where it has the rights to do so, MIT Press is working with the Internet Archive (IA) to digitize hundreds of it’s deep backlist books and to enable open access where legal and practical. At a minimum, the digitized books will be available for free one-at-a-time lending through openlibrary.org and through libraries that participate in IA’s broader Open Libraries project, which enables libraries that own the hard copies to offer digital access to their patrons—just like borrowing a book.

Come learn how your library or publishing house may benefit when publishers digitize their legacy publications, making them accessible, searchable and discoverable for future generations. Arcadia has pledged to fund other university presses that join this effort. As MIT Press Director, Amy Brand, notes: “I see this effort as one way to get out in front of widespread circulation of unauthorized digital files for these works.” Explore this groundbreaking model for cooperation between publishers, authors and libraries to ensure critical works from the past will be preserved and enjoyed by future generations.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy Brand

Amy Brand

Director, MIT Press
Amy Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Previously, she served as VP Academic and Research Relations and VP North America at Digital Science. From 2008 to 2013, Brand worked at Harvard University, first as Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Hanamura

Wendy Hanamura

Summit Director & Emcee; Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive
Wendy Hanamura is the master juggler of the Decentralized Web Summit 2018. She led the team that produced the first DWeb Summit in 2016 and the team building this event.As Director of Partnerships at the Internet Archive, one of the world’s largest digital libraries, Hanamura has... Read More →
avatar for Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle

Founder, Internet Archive
A passionate advocate for public Internet access and a successful entrepreneur, Brewster Kahle has spent his career intent on a singular focus: providing Universal Access to All Knowledge. He is the founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries... Read More →


Thursday November 9, 2017 10:20am - 11:05am
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Beyond Vendor Fairs: Partnering with Vendors to Engage End Users
By expanding the value proposition beyond database promotion and training, librarians can reach a broader audience and appeal to new constituents while filling a need. IEEE has partnered with customers to offer unique and engaging programs such as publishing days, entrepreneurship panels, online scavenger hunts, and career networking programs. This panel will examine practitioner and vendor best practices in library marketing and outreach efforts. The goal of the panel is to present tangible ideas for programs that increase the visibility and recognition of the library and demonstrate the results achieved at three IEEE customers.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Wald Berkman

Susan Wald Berkman

Assistant Director of Collection Development & Technical Services, Nova Southeastern University/ Alvin ShermanLibrary
Susan is the Assistant Director of Collection Development & Technical Services at the Alvin Sherman Library, Research and Information Technology Center at Nova Southeastern University. She started out as the Subject Specialist for Business at NSU and has her own information services... Read More →
avatar for Jalyn Kelley

Jalyn Kelley

Manager Client Services Americas, IEEE Xplore Digital Library
Jalyn Kelley is an IEEE Client Services Manager, providing training and support to IEEE Xplore customers in the central and southern U.S. Prior to joining IEEE, Jalyn spent seven years as a Research Analyst at Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) providing strategic market and technical... Read More →
NL

Nancy Linden

Science and Engineering Librarian, University of Houston
avatar for William H. Mischo

William H. Mischo

Head, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center and Berthold Family Professor in Information Access and Discovery, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Bringing Data Home: Perspectives on Purchasing Locally Hosted Data
Due to a surging wave of interest around interdisciplinary research data on campus, The Ohio State University Libraries (OSUL) deployed a research data purchase pilot program during fiscal year 2017. Suggested research data resources for potential purchase were recommended by campus researchers and subject librarians alike. Three of the purchases required local hosting of the data; while previously done on a smaller scale, working through the internal requirements and processes for both acquiring and hosting data unearthed many learning opportunities for both librarians and vendors. These areas included pricing, licensing, technological considerations, access, user support, and assessment, both internal and external to our library organization.

Panelists for this session include two librarians from OSUL who managed the pilot program, as well as vendor representatives from the two companies that produce the data that were purchased and required local hosting. Together, panelists will highlight notable aspects of these processes from each perspective, hoping to establish a dialogue around future best practices.

In this panel discussion you will learn about the opportunities and challenges encountered during this pilot program, from both the library and vendor perspectives, as well as an approach to establish your own best practices around purchasing data. Audience members will have an opportunity to engage with the panel during a question and answer period.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Foster

Anita Foster

Electronic Resources Officer, Ohio State University
JG

Jeremy Groen

Academic Lead, Infogroup
avatar for Kris Hodgins

Kris Hodgins

Manager, Gallup Analytics, Gallup
I manage the Gallup Analytics platform for Gallup. Our platform allows users to access crucial data for their research on topics including politics, economics and well-being.
avatar for Gene Springs

Gene Springs

Collections Strategist, The Ohio State University Libraries



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

COUNTER Release 5
COUNTER Release 5 Code of Practice published in the summer of 2017 following in depth consultation with librarians, publishers and vendors. It is a significant change from Release 4 and is designed to provide greater simplicity and clarity.
This session will explain the four Master Reports that are the foundation of the new release. It will also cover standard views, metric types, related attributes, simplified report formats, COUNTER_SUSHI and the deadline for implementation.
Librarians and content providers will also hear about new approaches to familiar problems and the guidance which will be available to support the transition to Release 5 by January 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Estelle

Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Pesch

Oliver Pesch

Chief Strategist, EBSCO
Oliver Pesch works as chief product strategist for EBSCO Information Services where he helps set direction for EBSCO's e-resource services and products, including EBSCO Usage Consolidation and EBSCONET Analytics. Oliver is a strong supporter of standards and is very involved in the... Read More →



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Expanding Access to University Press Books: A Multi-Format Consortium Collection Development Model
The Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) was established as a non-profit corporation in 1987 to support and enhance the library and information services of universities in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. In 2016, WRLC partnered with Oxford University Press and GOBI Library Solutions to purchase the Oxford Scholarship Online eBook collection and additional print copies to be stored in the WRLC Shared Collections Facility. Developed to address two key goals, the facility is designed to free valuable space in the campus libraries by providing a cost-effective shelving alternative for print material but also allow the library to carefully control the movement to digital in a way that supports their faculty and student’s needs.

In acquiring new digital versions of monographic content through the OxfordScholarship Online (OSO) platform and purchasing additional copies in print, WRLC ensures its members access to new monographic content published by OUP. As research moves towards a digital future, this program allows WRLC members to sustainably manage that transition and satisfy user needs for the format of choice – print and/or digital. GOBI Library Solutions provides collection development and workflow support for WRLC and the member libraries that allows members the ability to continue to collect OUP content for their institution without duplicating the OUP content purchased by WRLC.

Join our panel of representatives as they discuss:

• How WRLC decided on this model
• Working as partners
• How this purchase impacted individual member libraries’ collection development strategy
• Implementing a similar program for your institution or consortium

Speakers
avatar for Kristine Baker

Kristine Baker

VP Inside Sales & Consortia, GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Senior Director, Institutional Sales, Americas, Oxford Univeristy Press
Rebecca Seger is the Senior Director for Institutional Sales at Oxford University Press USA.  She has been working with libraries for her entire career, currently leading the OUP team that works with, and sells, to all types of libraries and consortia in North and South America... Read More →
CZ

Cathy Zeljak

Washington Research Library Consortium



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Forging Ahead: Exploring Paths to Open Access for Review Journals

The Open Access movement - first established in the biomedical sciences – has primarily been focused on securing the wide dissemination of primary research literature. This is despite the potential for review journals to contribute to the progress of science and benefit of society. Review articles summarize research findings, draw together and integrate strands of knowledge, assess practical applications, and point to unanswered questions. Expanding their availability has the potential to accelerate research and the speed at which new research findings are assessed, disseminated and implemented. Yet the OA movement has largely overlooked review journals, and established OA business models (in particular the APC model) are incongruent with expert authored, editorially intensive review publications.

This presentation will describe first a project supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s initiative, Increasing Openness and Transparency in Research, to convert one of the world's leading public health journals, the Annual Review of Public Health (ARPH), to OA. The objective of this program is to advance public health research and discourse as well as create a mechanism to make valuable review content OA to maximize research impact and investments. Building on the collective spirit in which libraries, funders, and publishers work together to ensure sustainable funding for journals that switch from subscription to OA, this presentation will describe this publisher-driven initiative to secure a sustainable transition path for review journals. The presentation will chart the progress of the program- describing the effect of OA on usage and readership metrics of the journal, as well as describing progress towards building a sustainable collective funding base of subscribing libraries, funding agencies and stakeholders in public health.

The second section of the presentation will explore the kinds of relationships libraries and publishers can forge to work as partners and create a sustainable market that meets the needs of scholars and libraries. What kinds of new thinking around financial models, risk and true engagement will help move the needle further towards openness?



Speakers
avatar for Jeff Kosokoff

Jeff Kosokoff

Head, Collection Strategy & Development, Duke University Libraries
Collaboration, connectivity and cooperation at network scale are transforming the work of scholars and the nature of scholarship. Libraries, seen at the level of the network, are developing new models of location-independent resource sharing to help enable and leverage this transformation... Read More →
avatar for Kamran Naim

Kamran Naim

Director of Partnerships and Initiatives, Annual Reviews
Kamran Naim is Director of Partnerships and Initiatives for the non-profit publisher Annual Reviews in Palo Alto, California, and is also a Doctoral Candidate and Research Lead at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education. His interests span the breadth of scholarly publishing... Read More →



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Landing the Job: Tips and Tricks to Prepare Students for the Job Hunt
With universities, parents, and politicians paying close attention to student success after college, academic libraries are making efforts to support career readiness and preparation through collections and licensed resources as well as related instruction sessions and reference services. At this panel, presenters from three universities will discuss a wide range of practical opportunities for libraries to support career preparation across campus, including partnering with Career Services for database cost sharing and career readiness workshops, teaching students to conduct company and industry research for interview preparation and salary negotiation, and out-of-the-box opportunities at Career Fairs and Alumni Association events.

After attending this session, participants will be able to articulate methods and processes for developing career readiness services for both graduate and undergraduate students. The session will conclude with an interactive discussion of how participants could adapt the techniques described for use at their home institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Howard

Heather Howard

Business Information Specialist, Purdue University
avatar for Lauren Reiter

Lauren Reiter

Business Librarian, Penn State University Libraries
Lauren Reiter is currently the Sally W. Kalin Librarian for Learning Innovations and the Business Librarian who specializes in finance, economics and risk management. Her previous experience includes conducting business research as a corporate analyst at The Freedonia Group in Cleveland... Read More →
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Nora Wood

Business Librarian, University of South Florida Libraries


Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

One Root, Many Trees: Reviving Collections Practices
Collections departments have undergone intense changes and pressures from technology, uncertain budgets, and shifting perspectives on how best to develop collections. While all collection models are rooted in the growth and preservation of the cultural and scholarly record, our case study examines the activities of the dedicated collections department at our university library system.  This model has proved not only highly successful, but adaptable to the constancy of change. 

Stories of collections management “points of pain” -- drawn from our experiences -- will be reviewed and discussed. These examples will showcase how one library intentionally kept their collection management department intact and addressed the pressures and changes facing all academic libraries in the following areas:
*The relationship between collections models and the growth of universities in the post-war period.
*The challenges of collecting at large scale during periods of economic uncertainty.
*Our project to establish “Collections of Distinction” that capture emerging scholarly needs and focus collections investments, in collaboration with university faculty.
*Collections Librarians as Scholarly Partners: Developing creative partnerships to fund strategic but cost-prohibitive products.
*The Move to Expert-Approval Plans:
*Curating the collection at the book level for the Arts.
*Having a Seat at the Curriculum and Program Approval Table: Recognition that Collections Librarians have the most accurate pulse on the collection process.
Dedicated Collection Librarians offer unique and knowledgeable perspectives about collection plans.
*Case history of establishing collections for an engineering program from the ground up.

*Growth of collections budgets necessitated expert oversight: importance of stewardship.
 

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Farley

Kevin Farley

Humanities Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
Kevin Farley is Humanities Collections Librarian for VCU Libraries, and also serves on the Advisory Board for British Virginia. He has had a longstanding interest in the cultural role of libraries to widen the circulation of ideas, despite constricting historical pressures. This... Read More →
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Engineering & Science Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Developing and maintaining relevant collections, providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Sobczak

Patricia Sobczak

Business & Public Affairs Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries
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Emily Winthrop

Arts Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Professional Prologue: Building a Community of Practice for Assessment and User Experience Librarians
To meet users’ needs for new resources and services, over the past several years academic libraries have shifted staffing from more “traditional” areas of librarianship to “functional specialist” positions, such as digital data management, copyright, assessment, and e-resources management. [1] Because these newer positions are typically situated in small or even one-person departments, functional specialists can struggle to acquire training and professional development in-house, and may sometimes feel isolated.
A Community of Practice can provide a powerful foundation for academic library functional specialists. As introduced by Etienne Wegner, in a Community of Practice learning and practice are inherently social, and both are reinforced through engagement with other community members. [2] Members of a Community of Practice learn by doing, observing, and interacting with practitioners and other learners as part of a social process that involves “fitting in” as much as learning skills. [3]
In this presentation, we will report on a program designed to introduce twelve Library and Information Science (LIS) Master’s students to the assessment and user experience Community of Practice. Through coursework, co-curricular training, professional and social development, mentoring, and apprenticeship, the students selected for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians (LB21)-funded “Experience Assessment (UX-A)” program are earning the American Library Association-Accredited Master’s degree while gaining specialized expertise in user experience and assessment. We will describe the structure of the program and provide early evidence of success, including the students’ reflections on their experiences, findings that have implications for practice and education in assessment and user experience. Attendees will also learn how to implement aspects of the Community of Practice model in their own institutions.

Speakers
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Dania Bilal

Professor, University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences
avatar for Rachel Fleming-May

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, The University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
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Regina Mays

Head, Assessment Programs and Collection Strategy, University of Tennessee Libraries
avatar for Carol Tenopir

Carol Tenopir

Chancellor's Professor, University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences
A frequent speaker at professional conferences and prolific author, Carol Tenopir is a Chancellor's Professor and Director of the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee. She is on the Board of Directors for project COUNTER and the Principal... Read More →
avatar for Teresa Walker

Teresa Walker

Associate Dean for Learning, Research, and Engagement, University of Tennessee Libraries
My interests include libraries' contribution to student success, learning space design, liaison programs, and more.



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Re-imagining Collection Development
In the GW Libraries we are committed to making collection development more transparent, collaborative, and responsive to our users’ needs. Drawing on principles of agile project management, and leveraging the data at our disposal, we put together year-long project teams and developed new tools to address five key areas: the serials’ renewal workflow, budgeting and expenditure, demand-driven acquisition, negotiation with vendors, and communication with university stakeholders. Each project team was cross-functional, employing staff from the following areas: collection development, research & user services, acquisitions, electronic resources, and library IT. In addition to addressing complex problems in collection management, team members surfaced valuable data about our collections, learned new skills, gained a more holistic understanding of the collections lifecycle, and practiced a transparent and iterative approach to project management. In this panel we will talk about our approach to assembling teams and identifying team leaders, share examples of our use of data to inform and communicate decisions about collections, and discuss organizational opportunities and challenges.

Attendees will:

Learn about agile project management/scrum as a framework for organizing library processes.

Explore new ways of using data and data visualization to inform collection development decisions.

Discuss strategies for re-imagining collection development processes and practices.

Speakers
PC

Peter Cohn

Director of Research Services, The George Washington University GW Libraries & Academic Innovation
avatar for Dolsy Smith

Dolsy Smith

Software Development Librarian, ILS, The George Washington University
I am a software developer at the George Washington University, part of the Washington Research Libraries Consortium (DC), which recently migrated from Voyager to Alma and Primo VE. At GW, I manage configurations and integrations, and I coordinate efforts to optimize our workflows... Read More →


Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Reimagining Research Services as Part of Major Academic Library Renovations: A Tale of Two Research Departments (University of Central Florida and Florida Gulf Coast University)
Two academic library Research Services managers will discuss changes and innovations they have coordinated in their respective libraries (University of Central Florida serving 60,000+ students http://library.ucf.edu/21st/ and Florida Gulf Coast University serving 15,000+ students http://library.fgcu.edu/admin/renewal.html ) due to major building renovations that their respective libraries are currently conducting.

Significantly downsizing print reference collections, relocating service points, reconfiguring public services, re-thinking staffing patterns, adjusting Subject Liaison face-to-face activities, stepping-up online services, communicating with stakeholders, and keeping students and faculty in the loop so that their voices are heard and their needs met, are just a few of the issues to be discussed with program participants.

Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own Research Services and institutional experiences and perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning strategies for meeting the challenges of renovation planning and redesigning public services in their own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Colding

Linda Colding

Head of Reference, Research, & Instruction, Florida Gulf Coast University Library
Reference, Research, Mobile Librarian services
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). | | Barbara was an Invited... Read More →



Thursday November 9, 2017 11:35am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Shotgun Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Bringing open data into focus on campus (Mary Ellen Sloane)

The presenter will discuss the outcome of the work of a Faculty Learning Community that is working to bring greater understanding of open data and data sharing to a large regional university. Open data refers to data sets that can be accessed by anyone. Open data is part of a larger movement in scholarly sharing, and every academic discipline benefits from the availability of open data. Open data and analytics are a key component of today’s business, communications, science, health, education, social science, humanities, and technology environments. Researchers are expected to use open data and share data. Students should expect to understand and use data sets in their professional lives. The size and scale of research data available is growing daily and data sets are multifaceted. Data and repositories is often not easily discoverable. It is therefore challenging for professors and students to use the data effectively and make meaningful and valid interpretations of the data.

The presenter will share best practices and lessons learned about leading a faculty group that is seeking provide support training for students and faculty in the use of open data on campus in teaching and research. The presenter will also share the results of a collaboration with the Office of Research in exploring how open data can accelerate preliminary research and make faculty more competitive for external funding.

Attendees can expect to learn strategies for taking a leadership role and create a dialogue with campus constituencies about open data in teaching and research.

2) Boosting the Open Access Policy (Anneliese Taylor)

Passing an open access policy is a great way for an institution to assert its will to make scholarly published content open to the world. Getting authors at a large, research-intensive university to participate in the implementation of the policy is a whole other ball game. Four years into UCSF’s faculty OA policy, we embarked on a project to increase the level of engagement with the research information system our university licenses, and to boost the number of deposited articles in our repository.

This talk will highlight the outcomes of this six-month project, including the change in deposits and what we learned about what worked (and didn’t work) to get people engaged with the system.

3) Follow the Money: An exploratory study of open access publishing funds’ impact (Amanda Click, Rachel Borchardt)

Academic libraries have been supporting researchers with open access funds since 2005, and more libraries join this movement every year. These funds generally pay the article processing charges (APC) for articles accepted to peer-reviewed fully open access journals. According to SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, libraries have reimbursed APCs for almost 5,500 open access publications. Organizations like SPARC and the Registry of Open Access Repository Mandates and Policies (ROARMAP) collect and provide access to information about OA mandates, funds and policies, but where exactly is the money from these OA funds going? Who is using library OA funds to publish their work? Where do they publish? What kind of impact do these funds have on scholarly communication? In order to address these questions, the authors collected citation and author data for articles supported by library OA funds. This session presents the initial findings of their data analysis - including author, academic field, and journal trends.

The objective of this session is to help librarians better understand how and where OA funds are being spent, with a particular emphasis on the scholars who apply for these funds, the journals in which they choose to publish, and the academic disciplines in which researchers seek out OA publishing opportunities. Findings may inform the development of new OA fund programs, as well as OA awareness efforts on campus. In addition, libraries who already offer this type of funding might use these findings to develop outreach to underrepresented disciplines or types of researchers, refine effective messaging or talking points regarding OA funds, or consider changes to their OA funding policies.

4) In medias res of an ORCID implementation (John Novak)

Nearly two years ago, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries signed up for an institutional license for ORCID. As we approach 2018, UNLV is on the cusp of rolling out ORCID to campus, including promoting it to faculty and graduate students as well as implementing connectivity features that makes ORCID the “plumbing in the research infrastructure.”

In this shotgun session, attendees will be brought “into the middle of things” of an ORCID implementation. Items discussed include the deliberate pre-planning of ORCID implementation, the hiring of two visiting librarians, investigating the limits of ORCID connectivity with research information management systems and the institutional repository, and the pilot projects that prepared UNLV for a 2018 rollout.

5) What do those scholars want anyway? (Maria Bonn)

The work of "Understanding the Needs of Scholars in a Contemporary Publishing Environment," a the Mellon funded initiative at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign has been underway for two years and includes a research effort led by the School of Information Sciences at UIUC. That effort includes a survey of hundreds of humanities scholars and extensive interviews with dozens of scholars, all designed to create a deeper understanding of scholarly publishing ambitions and experience, especially in relationship to the panoply of publishing modes and media currently available. Lessons learned from the research inform the development of publishing capacity at UIUC and are intended to be shared with the scholars, publishers and librarians who are part of the scholarly community. This session will provide an overview and some pithy insights into what we've learned about scholars' goals in publishing and how well those goals are met by both established and innovative ways of publishing.

Moderators
avatar for Jack Montgomery

Jack Montgomery

Coordinator of Acquisitions and Collection Services, Western Kentucky University
Jack G. Montgomery was born in Columbia, South Carolina. He earned his B.A. from the University of South Carolina, his MLS at the University of Maryland–College Park in 1987.  First, as a law librarian he worked in acquisitions, serials, and collection development in academic law... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Associate Director, Research and Instruction Services, Amrican University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Click

Amanda Click

Business Librarian, American University
Amanda is the business librarian at American University, supporting the research needs of the faculty and students in the Kogod School of Business. In 2016, she earned a PhD in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she studied the cultural... Read More →
avatar for John Novak

John Novak

Head, Scholarly Communication Initiatives Dept., UNLV (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
John Novak is the head of the Scholarly Communication Initiatives department at UNLV. This department manages Digital Scholarship@UNLV, UNLV's institutional repository, and leads and supports UNLV Libraries scholarly communication and research service efforts. He has published articles... Read More →
avatar for Mary Ellen  Sloane

Mary Ellen Sloane

User Services Librarian for Basic and Applied Sciences, Middle Tennessee State University
Mary Ellen Sloane is the Science Librarian and an Associate Professor at Middle Tennessee State